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Old 04. Mar 2012, 06:51 AM   #21 (permalink)
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1GB is very small for Ubuntu I'm actually surprised it fit. Unless you set it up as persistent it will not save your changes to the USB drive. Read this for persistent explained

Puppy Linux in persistent mode will fit on a 1GB drive comfortably. I actually ran Puppy for a couple of years on a 1GB drive but I was limited on what I could use it for such as retrieving files on a computer that could no longer boot into windows.

I suggest you spend some time at the pendrivelinux web site and become more familiar with how the whole process works. I would also suggest getting a bigger USB drive. For example Bodhi Linux should be installed on at least a 2GB thumb drive. I'm not trying to push Bodhi Linux but I easily installed it by using a live CD. I directed the install to the USB drive instead of a hard drive but be absolutely sure it installs on the USB drive otherwise it will destroy the MBR on your HDD. Anyway I was able to save all my changes to my USB drive just like it would on a HDD. Thumb drives are getting cheaper now days I picked up a 8GB drive for $25.00 US. There are more options available on the bigger USB drives and it will also allow you to add a good number of applications with room to spare or run linux distro's that are compatible with your wireless system.

*Note* not all USB drives operate correctly as boot-able. Read here for Recommended USB Linux flash drives

Enjoy
Thanks for the Tips, I tried Bodhi Linux, but at first bootup it works & next bootup it has a problem & many times I format Kingston 8 GB pen drive & again installed Bodhi Linux on it, but same problem. BTW it still not detect my USB Lan, but In one laptop with wired telephone line I can connect to Internet.

Wary puppy also not detect my USB Lan however it detect wired telephon modem in other machine.

I think I should go for multiboot options suggested by panzer, so if one destro doesn't work switch to others.
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Old 04. Mar 2012, 08:08 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Thanks for the Tips, I tried Bodhi Linux, but at first bootup it works & next bootup it has a problem & many times I format Kingston 8 GB pen drive & again installed Bodhi Linux on it, but same problem. BTW it still not detect my USB Lan, but In one laptop with wired telephone line I can connect to Internet.
I wonder if the problem is with your USB drive. Did you check out these recommended USB drive?. I tried a 4GB Kingston and my computer had a hard time recognizing it. I bought a 8GB Sandisk and it worked with no issues. Have you ensured you have booting from a USB drive enabled in your BIOS? I had to change my BIOS and I also have to tap the F10 key (may vary with other computers)at boot-up and select the USB drive I have plugged into the computer.
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Old 22. Mar 2012, 01:04 AM   #23 (permalink)
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oh wow this is cool like the raspberry Pi computer
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Old 03. Apr 2012, 06:23 PM   #24 (permalink)
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I tried Racy puppy downloaded from below page on 1 gb pen drive. It is easily get connected to the internet with wireless usb also.

http://puppylinuxnews.org/home/new-racy-puppy/
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Old 05. Apr 2012, 10:28 AM   #25 (permalink)
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Another possibility is to make 2 partitions (or more) using Bootice (http://agnipulse.com/2011/11/partition-usb-flash-drive/). Put your Distro on one of them and use second as a storage for your files (FAT or NTFS, it doesn't matter).

In Linux, both will be seen (if not, use Disk Utility to mount them), while in Windows, only one will be seen (that ones with files in it). So, you can swap files between Windows and Linux easily so you do not have to use Linux every time you need some file.
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Old 05. Apr 2012, 07:21 PM   #26 (permalink)
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I guess there is more than one way to skin the proverbial cat. I've been running linux for years off USB drives and during that times I have found that it can be as complicated or as simple that you make it to be. I choose to do things simply and in doing so I also use quality USB drives along with tried and true methods for installing linux distro's on to that thumb drive. I have always used pendrivelinux as my guide and it has always worked without a hitch.

I guess it can be said that one size does not fit all but then were talking about linux on a USB drive not shoes.

Cheers
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Old 06. Apr 2012, 08:28 AM   #27 (permalink)
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Another possibility is to make 2 partitions (or more) using Bootice (http://agnipulse.com/2011/11/partition-usb-flash-drive/). Put your Distro on one of them and use second as a storage for your files (FAT or NTFS, it doesn't matter).

In Linux, both will be seen (if not, use Disk Utility to mount them), while in Windows, only one will be seen (that ones with files in it). So, you can swap files between Windows and Linux easily so you do not have to use Linux every time you need some file.
If, for some reason, BOOTICE doesn't work properly with your USB, try this two methods instead:

- use Diskmod (http://agnipulse.com/2012/03/filter-...-disk-windows/)

- make a NTFS partition as first and FAT as second (and put a live Distro on second one). Both will be seen in Linux, but just first with NTFS (which you will use as storage) will be seen in Windows.
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Old 07. Apr 2012, 09:09 AM   #28 (permalink)
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Another reason why to use Linux on USB with 2 partitions is that if your persistant overlay file gets full (and you don't notice that until it is too late), your USB won't boot anymore. So it is better to have all your files on another partition. That way, you can use Disk Utility from Live Linux CD and format the partition with Linux. The next step is that you put your Linux Distro on newly formatted partition and off you go. Files on NTFS won't be affected by this.

You can try Overlay Recovery, but this method can destroy all your data ...
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Old 08. Apr 2012, 06:22 PM   #29 (permalink)
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- make a NTFS partition as first and FAT as second (and put a live Distro on second one). Both will be seen in Linux, but just first with NTFS (which you will use as storage) will be seen in Windows.
EDIT: This method doesn't work because you can only bo-ot from the first partition on the USB and not from the second.
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Old 10. Apr 2012, 01:15 AM   #30 (permalink)
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Dedoimedo Just posted a how-to on making a USB drive in persistence mode. He offers several methods and is quite simple to understand. Its well worth a look.
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