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chris.p 22. Mar 2009 08:09 PM

OpenDNS - what / why / how
 
1 Attachment(s)
Here's a thread for OpenDNS - how you can use it and why.

I use it to substitute for the ISP's default DNS servers that get installed automatically on your broadband router. This has two benefits:

1. For me, the main benefit (and a massive one) is that the OpenDNS servers are updated immediately, so when I set sites live or move them or change DNS settings - OpenDNS goes live with those settings in 5 minutes and I can see the new livesite straightaway. In contrast, the ISP's cr@p DNS servers, on the router by default, are often 2 days out of date. Useless.

2. ISPs are starting to introduce targeted, profile-based advertising - ie they look at your traffic and show you ads to match your perceived interests. One channel for this, and often stage 1 of this process, is to show you ads when you enter a non-existent domain name or other faulty HTTP request. You get their custom 404 page - all adverts, targeted at you personally or in relation to the faulty request. Remove their DNS servers and they can't do this - you don't go through them [edit] for DNS requests.

Just go to your router admin -- find the DNS server info -- save it -- insert these IPs instead:

208.67.222.222
208.67.220.220

[edit]
But be aware this may cause your router to reboot. This won't affect most people, but you wouldn't do it if someone is doing a download or something.

[edit]
Added pic of router DNS configs -- DNS.gif
Unfortunately the forum converts a nice sharp gif to a blurry jpeg but it's still legible.

kendall.a 22. Mar 2009 10:46 PM

Chris, do you notice any speed increase or decrease?

How about difference, good or bad, in pings?

The reason I'm asking is that I have a 7 MB DSL connection. It's fast. However, my ping often stinks on some gaming sites/programs that I use; seriously affects gameplay.

jim 22. Mar 2009 11:25 PM

I changed to OpenDNS a couple of months ago and find it a lot faster.

chris.p 22. Mar 2009 11:28 PM

I think you need to do a traceroute on your connection, to see what's happening. This will give you a better idea of the problem. You can use a desktop app for this, like Webhopper from proletary. com, or an online service like the visual traceroute from yougetsignal. com/ tools/visual-tracert/
[remove gaps]

After that, use a service that shows packet loss on each hop. Getting a bit techie eh. But that will show why it's slow. Like you say a 7MB hookup is quick, and should give really good results - so the answer is somewhere else. This is an ISP routing and backbone issue, not DNS.

The DNS service works like this: you want to go to a website, and you know its friendly name, like techsupportalert.com or something. So you enter that in the browser address bar. But there are no websites called that, it would be impossible to run a network this way - all addresses on the Net must be numerical. So somewhere there has to be a list of what names tie up to what numbers - this is the DNS service.

You type the name in the address bar - the browser scratches its head and thinks, where the ****'s that? - it goes to a DNS server that it knows the address of, and asks them - they give it the real, numeric address - the browser goes to that and, bosh, you're at TSA or wherever.

Takes a long time to describe but it happens in 0.25 of a second. It's so fast you don't even know it's happening, which is why it's described as transparent.
[edit]
...except that sometimes it's slow - which is why the OpenDNS service is better because it will be faster and up to date as well, unlike ISPs' DNS servers.

The DNS servers are obviously critical to this. Every ISP has its own set. But they are often out of date, and also vulnerable to manipulation. So an open-source solution is better in every way. But you are always within your own ISP's network until you reach their partners' networks, to get to the required site. The DNS tells you the address to head for. It's possible of course that the route might be modified in some way, depending on the info you get from the OpenDNS servers, and even because you have gone to them in the first place.

But this is a network administration matter and certainly not my game...

[edit]
ps I don't bother using the traceroute stuff on the desktop (within the OS, Windows or Linux command prompt I mean) because it gives the info but not the analysis - and the analysis (eg what country etc) is what you need.

chris.p 23. Mar 2009 08:31 PM

Cunning ISP trick found, for #3 DNS IP
 
I found a cunning ploy being used by an ISP, yesterday.

They have got wise to the fact that people are changing out their DNS IPs for OpenDNS etc, so they have bounced back with a clever trick.

Most people don't fill the #3 slot for DNS IPs on their router - I would imagine - and like me they just fill the first two. Yesterday I found that my ISP had remotely filled the third slot with their own DNS server IP, and instead of using the first two slots - #1 and #2 - as the router of course should do, they were fixing it to use #3. The cunning swine.

That meant I was back to seeing their ads when the HTTP request was refused.

So I fixed them - I deleted their DNS server in slot #3 and just cloned the OpenDNS one in slot 1 to #3 as well. Seems to work, I get OpenDNS now instead of the ISP's lousy service and trash adverts.

I'm waiting for when they block all DNS requests except from their own servers. Might need a change in the T & C though...

MidnightCowboy 25. Mar 2009 05:33 PM

Less techie users (like me) might just be interested to know that using OpenDNS protects against phishing and botnets* in addition to permitting variable levels of content control. Parents/guardians might like this feature a lot!

*This includes protection against all current versions of the Conficker virus

chris.p 25. Mar 2009 05:38 PM

Right dude.

But someone just mentioned to me there may be privacy concerns about OpenDNS, it's actually owned by minions of the NSA or something.

Probably just a crazy paranoid.

I don't care anyway, it's efficient, unlike my ISP's DNS servers. If they get any exciting info from me, they're welcome to it. As long as it doesn't go to Goggle of course. Let's hope they're commercial rivals...

But don't you have to pay for that protection stuff? I know they do a paid service as well.

MidnightCowboy 25. Mar 2009 10:29 PM

Nope - least ways I'm using it and no one's asked for a CC number yet. I should add that from what I can understand it won't prevent you from getting this Nickerbocker virus thing but it will prevent it from phoning home to whichever 10,000 or so servers it's programmed so to do. Must be real frustrating to have all that energy and be stuck inside someone's PC.

mr6n8 30. Mar 2009 11:21 PM

Thanks for this thread.
I ran across an article suggesting OpenDNS as a way to get better speeds on torrents and had no idea what it was.
Came back to TSA and the answer was here.

chris.p 30. Mar 2009 11:57 PM

OK Steve

We're still arguing about it here but I think the upshot is, you can see gains if your ISP was previously routing you over its partner networks in order to save money, but that route is slower than the optimum one given by OpenDNS. However this isn't my area.

You can have a laugh with this by downloading the excellent free traceroute tool Webhopper, and seeing the countries your traffic gets bounced around:

www.proletary.com

To get nextdoor you are sometimes routed halfway round the world - twice. I guess this would explain why ping time is so bad sometimes. This tool is good because you get to see the countries immediately, a command line traceroute can't do that.

Choose a site or IP and watch your traffic go back and forth between countries that are nowhere near the place you want to go :(

Why can't it just go straight there like when I get on a plane to go there??

aram535 05. Apr 2009 11:43 AM

As far as speed, it's going to add to your latency, since each request has to travel much further (number of hops). It's milliseconds, but it adds up.

Just to send an email from one machine to another machine, your system does about 6 DNS queries, and think of all of the different apps, tabs, etc that is running on your system that do DNS queries. You can be doing hundreds an hour.

If you're really curious -- install something wireshark on your machine, and set it to monitor DNS traffic and leave it in the background do normal work for about an hour. Than take a look at the captured data, you'll be very surprised.

DvdOwens 09. Aug 2009 07:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kendall (Post 2015)
Chris, do you notice any speed increase or decrease?

How about difference, good or bad, in pings?

The reason I'm asking is that I have a 7 MB DSL connection. It's fast. However, my ping often stinks on some gaming sites/programs that I use; seriously affects gameplay.

It's Faster , That's the reason I first sarted using it.

rhiannon 30. Aug 2009 03:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MidnightCowboy (Post 2150)
Less techie users (like me) might just be interested to know that using OpenDNS protects against phishing and botnets* in addition to permitting variable levels of content control. Parents/guardians might like this feature a lot!

*This includes protection against all current versions of the Conficker virus

I've used OpenDNS on and off for years - the last few years it really bogs down my connection when I use it either on the router or one computer. It could just be my neck of the woods.
In looking for alternatives I came across DNS Advantage and started using it. The speed increase over my ISP's DNS server is noticeable.
They don't have the protections against phishing etc. that OpenDNS has (at least as far as I can tell, I've never seen anything to indicate it does) but otherwise works great.

J_L 30. Aug 2009 06:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rhiannon (Post 11990)
I've used OpenDNS on and off for years - the last few years it really bogs down my connection when I use it either on the router or one computer. It could just be my neck of the woods.
In looking for alternatives I came across DNS Advantage and started using it. The speed increase over my ISP's DNS server is noticeable.
They don't have the protections against phishing etc. that OpenDNS has (at least as far as I can tell, I've never seen anything to indicate it does) but otherwise works great.

Comodo Secure DNS may be better for you. Both are owned by Neustar and have near-identical speeds (at least according to this: http://www.grc.com/dns/benchmark.htm)

chris.p 30. Aug 2009 03:22 PM

I don't get an account with OpenDNS and then select options etc - I just paste their DNS server IPs into the routers I want them on.

If you do it this way, the result is faster than your ISP DNS, you don't get a delay then trash advertising on a failed domain URL, and you don't give your ISP more data on what you are doing.

Also you don't get a delay while OpenDNS checks if you have an account with them, and another delay while they check every DNS request you make against their domains database for your specific feature requests eg child protection etc.

Just paste these into your router's 3 DNS server slots:

208.67.222.222
208.67.220.220
208.67.220.220

The reason I've repeated one for slot 3 is that ISPs are now trying to defeat OpenDNS, by remote inclusion of their own DNS server in slot 3 and then using slot 3 for DNS queries. Cunning huh.

Eventually we will see a row developing over this, and angry customers asking whether ISPs have a legal right to remotely reprogram peoples' routers and then use a DNS service they don't want, and then serve them advertising they don't want.

You read it here first.

rhiannon 31. Aug 2009 05:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J.L. (Post 11999)
Comodo Secure DNS may be better for you. Both are owned by Neustar and have near-identical speeds (at least according to this: http://www.grc.com/dns/benchmark.htm)

They both seem to be about the same speed - Comodo maybe a hair faster, I'll be keeping it. Thanks for the heads up

rhiannon 31. Aug 2009 05:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chris.p (Post 12009)
I don't get an account with OpenDNS and then select options etc - I just paste their DNS server IPs into the routers I want them on.

If you do it this way, the result is faster than your ISP DNS, you don't get a delay then trash advertising on a failed domain URL, and you don't give your ISP more data on what you are doing.

Also you don't get a delay while OpenDNS checks if you have an account with them, and another delay while they check every DNS request you make against their domains database for your specific feature requests eg child protection etc.

Just paste these into your router's 3 DNS server slots:

208.67.222.222
208.67.220.220
208.67.220.220

The reason I've repeated one for slot 3 is that ISPs are now trying to defeat OpenDNS, by remote inclusion of their own DNS server in slot 3 and then using slot 3 for DNS queries. Cunning huh.

Eventually we will see a row developing over this, and angry customers asking whether ISPs have a legal right to remotely reprogram peoples' routers and then use a DNS service they don't want, and then serve them advertising they don't want.

You read it here first.

I've never had an account with OpenDNS either - easier to just plug in the DNS addresses.
I love the idea of adding that third DNS, I'm going to use it.
I haven't had my ISP attempt such a thing, but I suspect its because they haven't thought of it. Thanks!

Sope 01. Sep 2009 12:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rhiannon (Post 12025)
I haven't had my ISP attempt such a thing, but I suspect its because they haven't thought of it.

Sadly, I think you may be right.

If OpenDNS grows big enough, no doubt many more ISP's will feel the need to try to block it.
As I have a dynamic IP address, I have to configure for OpenDNS via my computer rather than my router. I'm not sure whether this will make it easier or harder for my ISP to block my use of OpenDNS in the future if they so wish.

kendall.a 04. Sep 2009 01:29 AM

A couple questions:

1. I made the decision to change my dns settings via my network settings and not via my router. Does this impact the usefulness or speed of OpenDNS?

2. I know that there is a new software download for OpenDNS. It apparently sits in your tray and updates dynamic IP's in the background. Do I need this if I did not change my router settings?

3. Do most of you use the software, and if so, why?

Sope 04. Sep 2009 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kendall (Post 12156)
A couple questions:

1. I made the decision to change my dns settings via my network settings and not via my router. Does this impact the usefulness or speed of OpenDNS?

2. I know that there is a new software download for OpenDNS. It apparently sits in your tray and updates dynamic IP's in the background. Do I need this if I did not change my router settings?

3. Do most of you use the software, and if so, why?

1. I use network settings on computer and it seems quick enough for me - have you seen this thread - http://www.techsupportalert.com/free...ure-dns-3.html - where testing of different DNS speeds is discussed?

2. Whether you choose router or computer settings to access OpenDNS does not change this decision -

3. I don't use the software to monitor IP address as mine rarely changes even though it is dynamic (Virgin Media UK). So I just monitor my IP address myself.

rhiannon 04. Sep 2009 11:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kendall (Post 12156)
A couple questions:

1. I made the decision to change my dns settings via my network settings and not via my router. Does this impact the usefulness or speed of OpenDNS?

2. I know that there is a new software download for OpenDNS. It apparently sits in your tray and updates dynamic IP's in the background. Do I need this if I did not change my router settings?

3. Do most of you use the software, and if so, why?

1. I've set it up both ways over the years. It didn't seem to make a difference in speed.

2. I've never downloaded any software from them. I've always plugged in the DNS numbers in the proper boxes.

3. I don't use OpenDNS myself - for whatever reason it considerably slows down the connection speed and has for some years. Same result whether I configure the router or use network settings.
I started using the Comodo DNS, previous to that I was using DNS Advantage. They are both owned by the same company, and having tried both, there doesn't seem to be a difference in speed.
I use a DNS service because my ISP is usually slower and sometimes downright sluggish on the satellite internet we use.

js960 06. Sep 2009 10:11 PM

Those with routers using better firmware like Tomato might want to cache dns names. Default in Tomato is only 150, Ive set mine to 4000. I transmit from Europe where they only have 2 servers, but never suffered from speed problems. I know some who have. Lookups can be 3-4 times slower than to ISP, but thanks to cache that is a minor issue.

Another advantage of Tomato is DNS server can be forced. If set up right there is no way ISP will be used no matter set up in OS. If Opendns is used as parental control this matters.

Firefox and Chrome also cache dns names, now also pre-cache them. Enter a page and they will look-ahead. Why did they bother? as someone said about speed it "adds up" :)

You only need ip-software if you use account at Opendns, they need to know where you are. May be possible to do in router. They have a DNS-O-Matic https://www.dnsomatic.com/service for this btw. Neat if you use more services requiring ip. Click documentation to see software/hardware support.

Why? Had to try it and like control panel. If I had kids or uncontrollable grown ups using my computer I would probably take more advantage of blocking. And I do not agree with my ISP about blocking Piratebay.org

Problem with Opendns is they might be good with blocking porn but they are useless when it comes to malware. Hardly anything is done. Has been talked about for a long long time. Browsers are doing it, some Anti-whatever are trying and WOT is superb, but Opendns can be made systemwide protection with router magic - big difference. Seems like a wasted opportunity to me. They should just dump the not working social angle, get some dedicated domain hunters aboard. Soon 1000s of sites would be blocked - such sites are not up for debate. Must be blocked so no risk of complaints. Instead they try to find "reputable" sources and safe way for community to test. Test what? Will never happen and there must be other reasons - still, very cool service.

kendall.a 15. Sep 2009 02:07 AM

Odd Question
 
I have an odd question--

Does anyone know if OpenDNS would impact or forbid me from downloading a large 2 GB game file? I have tried with 3 different browsers on multiple websites to download a new demo game file/program. None of the browsers or websites worked. Can this have something to do with OpenDNS?

I have OpenDNS setup only on my PC, not via my DSL router. My son was able to download the file just fine.

MidnightCowboy 15. Sep 2009 01:33 PM

It's possible, but difficult to estimate without knowing how you have your OpenDNS filters set up via dashboard. You could try disabling the OpenDNS service temporarily or switching to Comodo 156.154.70.22, 156.154.71.22 to see if this works.

wdhpr 16. Sep 2009 02:48 AM

open dns and utorrent
 
I might have missed this question. But has anyone had trouble port forwarding utorrent with open dns. I cant seem to make it happen.

using a 2 wire dsl modem and a cisco linksys router along with online armor firewall.

I tried to port forward with my modem and my router. and added my static ip to online armor. No Joy

any suggestions?

Cheers
Wdhpr

chris.p 24. Sep 2009 09:32 PM

Well, Microtorrent works OK for me with a Linksys router, phone line, OpenDNS IPs, no on-PC OpenDNS stuff.

Are you saying, then, that if you use default IPs then it's OK?

Brendan Bryson 19. Nov 2009 05:09 PM

What I do is ping all the different dns servers and use the ones with the best ping. For me this is Open DNS. Also to take into consideration is your location. Some dns will be better for some areas than others.

kendall.a 19. Nov 2009 08:52 PM

Brendan, I would be more interested in the details of how you did this. What DNS servers did you ping and how? Please be specific.

Brendan Bryson 20. Nov 2009 04:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kendall (Post 16753)
Brendan, I would be more interested in the details of how you did this. What DNS servers did you ping and how? Please be specific.

Hi there I will list all the DNS that I have tried and try give a brief description of how I found them.

These are all level 3 dns, they have been around for a long time and use anycast which makes for a very resilient dns which is distributed evenly across the network.

4.2.2.1
4.2.2.2
4.2.2.3
4.2.2.4
4.2.2.5
4.2.2.6

If you use mobile broadband this is the way to go.

Open DNS which is much safer than other dns and also faster for some people. The only thing with this is that even thought it does use anycast servers are not located near some areas so you would not benifit on using open dns for speed if you stay far from there server.

208.67.220.220
208.67.222.222

Secure DNS (Comodo) basiclly the same as Open DNS. I get a slightly better ping with this so this is what I use.

156.154.70.22
156.154.71.22

My ISP DNS which gets around a 60ms ping average so not as good as Open DNS or secure DNS

62.24.128.191
62.24.128.190

These are dns servers in different areas.

OpenNIC
AU 58.6.115.42
AU 58.6.115.43
AU 119.31.230.42
BR 200.252.98.162
DE 217.79.186.148
FR 82.229.244.191
US 216.87.84.211


Here are some other DNS servers

66.93.87.2
216.231.41.2
216.254.95.2
64.81.45.2
64.81.111.2
64.81.127.2
64.81.79.2
64.81.159.2
66.92.64.2
66.92.224.2
66.92.159.2
64.81.79.2
64.81.159.2
64.81.127.2
64.81.45.2
216.27.175.2
66.92.159.2
66.93.87.2

Sprintlink General DNS

204.117.214.10
199.2.252.10
204.97.212.10

Cisco

128.107.241.185
192.135.250.69

There are loads online to chose from.

What I do is I ping them using the comand promt like this


C:\Documents and Settings\PC>ping 208.67.220.220

Pinging 208.67.220.220 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 208.67.220.220: bytes=32 time=32ms TTL=53
Reply from 208.67.220.220: bytes=32 time=32ms TTL=53
Reply from 208.67.220.220: bytes=32 time=32ms TTL=53
Reply from 208.67.220.220: bytes=32 time=32ms TTL=53

Ping statistics for 208.67.220.220:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 32ms, Maximum = 32ms, Average = 32ms

And you get your average ping. I do the ping test 2 times so that the server address is in my cache.

there are a few programs out there that claim to do this for you but beware some are malware.

Do a google search for public dns servers list and you will find loads more. I only recommend Open DNS and Secure DNS for safety and have heard that Secure DNS is the best but it all depends how close you are to the serer for quicker responses.

This is my take on the whole dns situation anyway. If you really want super fast dns then you may want to look into running your own caching server which has benefits but like all thins it has downsides as well. Anything else you want to know I would be happy to share.

Thanks.

kendall.a 20. Nov 2009 05:49 AM

Quote:

C:\DOCUME~1\OWNER>ping 208.67.220.220

Pinging 208.67.220.220 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 208.67.220.220: bytes=32 time=107ms TTL=57
Reply from 208.67.220.220: bytes=32 time=87ms TTL=57
Reply from 208.67.220.220: bytes=32 time=82ms TTL=57
Reply from 208.67.220.220: bytes=32 time=62ms TTL=57

Ping statistics for 208.67.220.220:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 62ms, Maximum = 107ms, Average = 84ms

C:\DOCUME~1\OWNER>ping 208.67.220.220

Pinging 208.67.220.220 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 208.67.220.220: bytes=32 time=62ms TTL=57
Reply from 208.67.220.220: bytes=32 time=68ms TTL=57
Reply from 208.67.220.220: bytes=32 time=61ms TTL=57
Reply from 208.67.220.220: bytes=32 time=126ms TTL=57

Ping statistics for 208.67.220.220:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 61ms, Maximum = 126ms, Average = 79ms

C:\DOCUME~1\OWNER>ping 156.154.70.22

Pinging 156.154.70.22 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 156.154.70.22: bytes=32 time=63ms TTL=58
Reply from 156.154.70.22: bytes=32 time=60ms TTL=58
Reply from 156.154.70.22: bytes=32 time=62ms TTL=58
Reply from 156.154.70.22: bytes=32 time=65ms TTL=58

Ping statistics for 156.154.70.22:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 60ms, Maximum = 65ms, Average = 62ms

C:\DOCUME~1\OWNER>ping 156.154.71.22

Pinging 156.154.71.22 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 156.154.71.22: bytes=32 time=58ms TTL=58
Reply from 156.154.71.22: bytes=32 time=73ms TTL=58
Reply from 156.154.71.22: bytes=32 time=53ms TTL=58
Reply from 156.154.71.22: bytes=32 time=66ms TTL=58

Ping statistics for 156.154.71.22:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 53ms, Maximum = 73ms, Average = 62ms

Based upon your post above, then, are you saying that I should be using Comodo DNS instead of the current Open DNS that I am using now?

Brendan Bryson 20. Nov 2009 06:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kendall (Post 16792)
Based upon your post above, then, are you saying that I should be using Comodo DNS instead of the current Open DNS that I am using now?

Well this is the thing depending on were you are in the world you will get different results from myself. What I would do is ping Open DNS & Secure DNS and see which you get the better ping to but be aware that ping is not the only thing that will affect responsiveness, the way that the DNS server caches results is another factor but as Open DNS & Secure DNS do this in similar ways this should not be an issue. When pinging these DNS servers remember to do it 2 times and use the second result.

Like I said above I have heard that Secure DNS from Comodo is more security friendly than the free version of Open DNS, I can not confirm this.

One last not the DNS that is provided by your own ISP may very well be the fastest or maybe it is not it all depends, but be assured both Open DNS & Secure DNS are more secure than most DNS offered by your ISP.

Thanks

kendall.a 20. Nov 2009 06:59 AM

Quote:

What I would do is ping Open DNS & Secure DNS and see which you get the better ping
That's exactly what I did and posted above?!

If you look at the pings that I posted, you will see that the first one is OpenDNS and the second is ComodoDNS. I pinged the DNS servers that you posted. If you look at the results above, you'll see that the second set of pings is lower than the first.

Brendan Bryson 20. Nov 2009 07:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kendall (Post 16795)
That's exactly what I did and posted above?!

If you look at the pings that I posted, you will see that the first one is OpenDNS and the second is ComodoDNS. I pinged the DNS servers that you posted. If you look at the results above, you'll see that the second set of pings is lower than the first.

OOps :o sorry kendall I thought that that was you quoting my post :o Yes if I were you I would use Comodo DNS. Most people will not notice a big improvement but as this it seems to be the closer and as I did say secure dns is supposed to be better than Open dns. One thing you will notice that ther are a lot of people who do not use secure dns because they do not trust Comod for some past issues they had but I and many others think that secure dns is the better choice. Let me know if you notice any difference.

Thanks.

J_L 20. Nov 2009 08:25 PM

Unless you have a use for the extra blocklists OpenDNS provides, I would suggest you to switch as well.

xobi 14. Mar 2010 12:37 PM

What about Google Public DNS?
 
Hi guys,
What is your opinion about Google DNS?
Open Dns are become very commercial. The cut down many useful features on there free version. I found Google Dns faster than Open Dns. There is no extra features with Google Dns. No filtering or nothing. You can simply use it. I found it really useful when my isp had troubles with there dns servers.

I figured it out bye using a software called Namebench. Found it on google codes. http://code.google.com/p/namebench/
http://namebench.googlecode.com/files/namebench-105.png

Google DNS - 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4

More Info: http://code.google.com/speed/public-dns/

rhiannon 14. Mar 2010 08:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xobi (Post 24337)
Hi guys,
What is your opinion about Google DNS?
Open Dns are become very commercial. The cut down many useful features on there free version. I found Google Dns faster than Open Dns. There is no extra features with Google Dns. No filtering or nothing. You can simply use it. I found it really useful when my isp had troubles with there dns servers.

I figured it out bye using a software called Namebench. Found it on google codes. http://code.google.com/p/namebench/
http://namebench.googlecode.com/files/namebench-105.png

Google DNS - 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4

More Info: http://code.google.com/speed/public-dns/

I have mixed results with OpenDNS - often they are slow. I've been bouncing between Google DNS and Comodo DNS.
Benchmarks on my end of the planet consistently show Google as the fastest - that's from using GRC's benchmark utility as well as Google's.

Ratzo 20. Mar 2010 04:56 AM

Easiest way is to download and use DNSBenchmark.exe from Gibson Research Corp

freedog96150 20. Mar 2010 07:49 AM

My results, not surprisingly, listed my personal DNS server as the fastest (by far). What threw me for a loop is that my ISP's servers were a solid second. OpenDNS was third with Google pretty far down the line. Since my ISP likes to hijack the name resolution, I have resorted to using OpenDNS as my forwarder and secondary DNS server.

Object lesson is that location plays a big role and YMMV.

Thanks everyone for posting a list of tools to check DNS speeds!

HeWhoRocks 21. Mar 2010 07:25 PM

This may be a daft question, but does openDNS work with mobile broadband?

Sope 21. Mar 2010 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by grf (Post 25021)
does openDNS work with mobile broadband?

Should do. Unless your particular provider actively blocks the use of an alternative DNS to it's own.


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