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-   -   OpenDNS - what / why / how (https://www.techsupportalert.com/freeware-forum/website-design-support-and-maintenance/374-opendns-what-why-how.html)

aram535 05. Apr 2009 11:43 AM

As far as speed, it's going to add to your latency, since each request has to travel much further (number of hops). It's milliseconds, but it adds up.

Just to send an email from one machine to another machine, your system does about 6 DNS queries, and think of all of the different apps, tabs, etc that is running on your system that do DNS queries. You can be doing hundreds an hour.

If you're really curious -- install something wireshark on your machine, and set it to monitor DNS traffic and leave it in the background do normal work for about an hour. Than take a look at the captured data, you'll be very surprised.

DvdOwens 09. Aug 2009 07:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kendall (Post 2015)
Chris, do you notice any speed increase or decrease?

How about difference, good or bad, in pings?

The reason I'm asking is that I have a 7 MB DSL connection. It's fast. However, my ping often stinks on some gaming sites/programs that I use; seriously affects gameplay.

It's Faster , That's the reason I first sarted using it.

rhiannon 30. Aug 2009 03:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MidnightCowboy (Post 2150)
Less techie users (like me) might just be interested to know that using OpenDNS protects against phishing and botnets* in addition to permitting variable levels of content control. Parents/guardians might like this feature a lot!

*This includes protection against all current versions of the Conficker virus

I've used OpenDNS on and off for years - the last few years it really bogs down my connection when I use it either on the router or one computer. It could just be my neck of the woods.
In looking for alternatives I came across DNS Advantage and started using it. The speed increase over my ISP's DNS server is noticeable.
They don't have the protections against phishing etc. that OpenDNS has (at least as far as I can tell, I've never seen anything to indicate it does) but otherwise works great.

J_L 30. Aug 2009 06:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rhiannon (Post 11990)
I've used OpenDNS on and off for years - the last few years it really bogs down my connection when I use it either on the router or one computer. It could just be my neck of the woods.
In looking for alternatives I came across DNS Advantage and started using it. The speed increase over my ISP's DNS server is noticeable.
They don't have the protections against phishing etc. that OpenDNS has (at least as far as I can tell, I've never seen anything to indicate it does) but otherwise works great.

Comodo Secure DNS may be better for you. Both are owned by Neustar and have near-identical speeds (at least according to this: http://www.grc.com/dns/benchmark.htm)

chris.p 30. Aug 2009 03:22 PM

I don't get an account with OpenDNS and then select options etc - I just paste their DNS server IPs into the routers I want them on.

If you do it this way, the result is faster than your ISP DNS, you don't get a delay then trash advertising on a failed domain URL, and you don't give your ISP more data on what you are doing.

Also you don't get a delay while OpenDNS checks if you have an account with them, and another delay while they check every DNS request you make against their domains database for your specific feature requests eg child protection etc.

Just paste these into your router's 3 DNS server slots:

208.67.222.222
208.67.220.220
208.67.220.220

The reason I've repeated one for slot 3 is that ISPs are now trying to defeat OpenDNS, by remote inclusion of their own DNS server in slot 3 and then using slot 3 for DNS queries. Cunning huh.

Eventually we will see a row developing over this, and angry customers asking whether ISPs have a legal right to remotely reprogram peoples' routers and then use a DNS service they don't want, and then serve them advertising they don't want.

You read it here first.

rhiannon 31. Aug 2009 05:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J.L. (Post 11999)
Comodo Secure DNS may be better for you. Both are owned by Neustar and have near-identical speeds (at least according to this: http://www.grc.com/dns/benchmark.htm)

They both seem to be about the same speed - Comodo maybe a hair faster, I'll be keeping it. Thanks for the heads up

rhiannon 31. Aug 2009 05:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chris.p (Post 12009)
I don't get an account with OpenDNS and then select options etc - I just paste their DNS server IPs into the routers I want them on.

If you do it this way, the result is faster than your ISP DNS, you don't get a delay then trash advertising on a failed domain URL, and you don't give your ISP more data on what you are doing.

Also you don't get a delay while OpenDNS checks if you have an account with them, and another delay while they check every DNS request you make against their domains database for your specific feature requests eg child protection etc.

Just paste these into your router's 3 DNS server slots:

208.67.222.222
208.67.220.220
208.67.220.220

The reason I've repeated one for slot 3 is that ISPs are now trying to defeat OpenDNS, by remote inclusion of their own DNS server in slot 3 and then using slot 3 for DNS queries. Cunning huh.

Eventually we will see a row developing over this, and angry customers asking whether ISPs have a legal right to remotely reprogram peoples' routers and then use a DNS service they don't want, and then serve them advertising they don't want.

You read it here first.

I've never had an account with OpenDNS either - easier to just plug in the DNS addresses.
I love the idea of adding that third DNS, I'm going to use it.
I haven't had my ISP attempt such a thing, but I suspect its because they haven't thought of it. Thanks!

Sope 01. Sep 2009 12:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rhiannon (Post 12025)
I haven't had my ISP attempt such a thing, but I suspect its because they haven't thought of it.

Sadly, I think you may be right.

If OpenDNS grows big enough, no doubt many more ISP's will feel the need to try to block it.
As I have a dynamic IP address, I have to configure for OpenDNS via my computer rather than my router. I'm not sure whether this will make it easier or harder for my ISP to block my use of OpenDNS in the future if they so wish.

kendall.a 04. Sep 2009 01:29 AM

A couple questions:

1. I made the decision to change my dns settings via my network settings and not via my router. Does this impact the usefulness or speed of OpenDNS?

2. I know that there is a new software download for OpenDNS. It apparently sits in your tray and updates dynamic IP's in the background. Do I need this if I did not change my router settings?

3. Do most of you use the software, and if so, why?

Sope 04. Sep 2009 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kendall (Post 12156)
A couple questions:

1. I made the decision to change my dns settings via my network settings and not via my router. Does this impact the usefulness or speed of OpenDNS?

2. I know that there is a new software download for OpenDNS. It apparently sits in your tray and updates dynamic IP's in the background. Do I need this if I did not change my router settings?

3. Do most of you use the software, and if so, why?

1. I use network settings on computer and it seems quick enough for me - have you seen this thread - http://www.techsupportalert.com/free...ure-dns-3.html - where testing of different DNS speeds is discussed?

2. Whether you choose router or computer settings to access OpenDNS does not change this decision -

3. I don't use the software to monitor IP address as mine rarely changes even though it is dynamic (Virgin Media UK). So I just monitor my IP address myself.


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