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Old 29. Jan 2013, 02:45 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Chrome OS

"One of the big changes to the latest versions of Chrome OS compared to earlier ones is that Google has added a Windows-style taskbar to the bottom of the screen."

"The parts of the Chrome OS that exist outside the browser—dialogue boxes, the task bar, and the file manager (another update)—are refreshingly simple compared to operating systems such as Windows or OSX."

"What’s most disappointing about all Chromebooks is the extent of their dependency on the Internet, and weakness without it. It’s possible for Chrome apps to work offline, but few of them take advantage of this functionality. Offline photo editing is impossible, which is a shame because a Chromebook would be a good companion on a vacation, when you might take a lot of photos."

"It could be that many software makers don’t think Chrome OS is worth supporting. Or it could be that Google has technical work still to do, since even the company’s own lineup of offline apps is weak."

"If Google wants its computers to make sense as anything more than the cheapest serviceable laptops on the market, it will have to either subsidize 3G data or fix Chrome OS’s offline limitations."

Source: New Chromebook: Getting Better, but Its Internet Dependence Is Limiting
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Old 05. Nov 2013, 05:58 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Default Chrome OS

Chrome OS, a Linux-based operating system, is developing aggressively and getting stronger. At least three key things are worth mentioning:

1. The Chromebook running the Chrome OS has increased in sales, bucking the trend of a reducing PC market as reported here earlier.

2. More new web apps are being added and they are able to run off-line and outside the Chrome browser.

3. Quickoffice has been ported by Google to run in Chrome OS using Native Client, allowing you to edit popular Microsoft Office files directly. The office suite is now available in the stable channel of Chrome OS after the app was offered to Android and iOS users for free.

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Old 18. Dec 2013, 04:38 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Not only for laptops, Chrome OS will be available for desktops as well, with all-in-one Chromebase expected to be introduced in 2014.

Read more: http://m.androidauthority.com/lg-chromebase-325574/

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Old 31. Dec 2013, 10:59 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Default Dual boot Chrome OS and Linux OS

"This guide details installation of a full standalone secondary Linux operating system with its own kernel (this could theoretically work with Windows or other OSs as well), fully functioning Chrome OS with update capability, and a nice pretty (and customizable) GRUB2 bootloader to select operating system on boot. Also covered is updating to new releases of Chrome OS and customizing the boot menu."

See: http://cr-48.wikispaces.com/Fully+Functional+Dual+Boot
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Old 20. May 2016, 07:44 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Default Chrome OS to run Android apps... And Nokia is coming back

Bringing Chrome OS and Android together, “is just a very pragmatic way of sharing more stuff.” Google wants to keep the personality of Chrome OS alive and this new feature as a “powerful way of bringing those two world together.”

http://techcrunch.com/2016/05/19/goo...-android-apps/

http://www.engadget.com/2016/05/19/a...y-on-chromeos/

How to run Android apps on Chrome OS:

http://www.pcworld.com/article/29052...-new-tool.html

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/...a-newer-model/


Nokia is coming back with a new generation of smartphones and tablets. The company said it would licence its brand to newly-established Finnish firm HMD Global — which has been founded by former Nokia execs — to create the new product portfolio for Google’s Android. This "new" Nokia company will create the Android handsets and tablets under the same name.

http://www.news.com.au/technology/ga...2a58ac07a2d11e
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Old 21. May 2016, 02:12 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Good news IO.Hazard. This is great to see how OSes are being converged to require only one app to run on all devices across PCs, laptops, tablets and phones.

Windows 10 has taken a lead on this in the market, and now we're seeing Chrome OS marrying Android to apply the same kernel and run the same apps. Developers will just need to code and release one app for all devices.

Chromebooks have already topped Macs in shipments to become no. 2 most popular PC OS in the US. With this new capability to run Android apps natively, Chrome OS is more likely to become the second most popular desktop/laptop OS in the worldwide market.

After Microsoft's and Google's such developments, what is Apple's plan now? Do they still need developers to design one app for iOS and another for Mac?

Chrome Blog: The Google Play store, coming to a Chromebook near you
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Old 22. May 2016, 05:51 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jojo Yee View Post
Chromebooks have already topped Macs in shipments to become no. 2 most popular PC OS in the US. With this new capability to run Android apps natively, Chrome OS is more likely to become the second most popular desktop/laptop OS in the worldwide market.
That's very true, Jojo Yee. These three articles explain how this transition could help Chrome OS to become a more powerful platform.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/30728...-platform.html

http://www.phonearena.com/news/What-...-merge_id75267

http://www.informationweek.com/softw...a/d-id/1323025
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Old 26. May 2016, 11:42 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Three important developments by Google with regards to its OS:

1. Android N is borrowing Chrome OS code for seamless update installation with two system partitions

One partition is active (online) and the other non-active (offline). Updating Android version can be done on the non-active system partition and when rebooted, the non-active system partition can take over as the active system partition.

"You can't use your phone for 25 minutes when updating the Android" will be the thing of the past. The device downtime is only the rebooting time.

2. Android N is the first version of the OS that has better supports for big screens with split screen and hidden floating functionality

Developers can apply this functionality to resize their apps based on various screen sizes. These app improvements will come to Chrome OS which runs on larger screens.

3. Chrome OS will run all Android apps natively in a container. It will have two app stores: Google Play and Chrome Web Store.

Check out Chromebooks that will work with Android apps later in 2016.


Sources:

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/...-installation/
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/...ere-expecting/
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Old 27. May 2016, 09:29 PM   #9 (permalink)
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I think the whole system has much more potential together than separated as Chrome OS and Android. Yes, Windows 10 has been going this direction, however, at the same time, they've created a large privacy problem. To be clear, I don't, as such, mind handing over a select amount of usage data to Microsoft or Google - I use Google Now, and until the whole Windows 10 fiasco, I participated in the MS customer experience improvement program - as long as it's my choice to hand over the data, and I can switch it off anytime I want. And while Microsoft is boasting its numbers, I really wonder how many people [I]aren't[I] upgrading to Windows 10 as a result. I've actually met someone who, on the first day of knowing them, started talking about Windows 10's spying - and she was not even a tech person. Mind you, we were both drunk - but that also says something bad for MS... usually people don't talk about that when drunk Also, I commute to work by (high speed) train fairly often, and I don't know how often I've seen Windows 7 with the "Upgrade to Windows 10" icon in the bottom right corner - possibly way more often than I've seen Windows 10 itself. However, this is an area where Chrandoid, let's just call it that, might really give Microsoft a run for its money. If you ask me, Google is more trustworthy when it comes to the data - and, you don't have to send usage statistics or use Google Now on Android. If you want, it can be completely private. So, suddenly, you have an environment with all the apps everyone knows on their phones coming to the desktop, just as the system almost everyone has on their computer at the moment turns into something that tracks what they do with no option to turn it off. Looks like a golden opportunity for Google, if you ask me, and I won't have much sympathy left for Microsoft if Google takes a good chunk of their market share.
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Old 28. May 2016, 01:12 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trainman261 View Post
So, suddenly, you have an environment with all the apps everyone knows on their phones coming to the desktop, just as the system almost everyone has on their computer at the moment turns into something that tracks what they do with no option to turn it off. Looks like a golden opportunity for Google, if you ask me, and I won't have much sympathy left for Microsoft if Google takes a good chunk of their market share.
Well said trainman261. It is interesting to see how this will develop. Google has dominance of Android apps in the mobile market and now it can bring them to the desktop. The mobile apps can run natively on the desktop without much recoding by software developers. The direction is from mobile to PC.

On the other hand, Microsoft has dominance of desktop software in the PC market and it has tried to bring them to the mobile, but such desktop software cannot run natively on the mobile without ground-up recoding by software developers. The direction is opposite, i.e., from PC to mobile.

Apparently the direction of mobile to PC is much easier to developers and end users as apps can run natively on both worlds, with a provision for apps to enhance and make use of the larger real estate of screens on the PC.

Chrome OS has already taken some market share away from Mac OS even before this new development. If Android apps run well in Chrome OS, I think it will take even more share away from Windows in the PC market in years to come.

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