Gizmo's Freeware Forum

Gizmo's Freeware Forum (https://www.techsupportalert.com/freeware-forum/)
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-   -   Pen drives as portable computers (https://www.techsupportalert.com/freeware-forum/portable-apps/3083-pen-drives-as-portable-computers.html)

wdhpr 24. Jan 2010 08:32 PM

Pen drives as portable computers
 
The best thing I like about pen drives. You can take your stuff with you. Your email and browser are all set the way you want them. Family pictures and video's as well as your favorite application available on the fly. This all fits on something you can carry on your key chain.
The part that I like the best is hearing your friends say (all that on that little thing)
Pen drives are very cheap now. I see 4 gig pen drives selling for $19 US all the time. There are many free portable application launchers being developed.
So far I am using and sticking with Portable Apps. http://portableapps.com/ (works well in linux using wine)
Cameo being one recently mentioned on this forum. http://cameo.binarybums.com/download.htm (I haven't tried yet) Has some great screen shots though.
Remember Application launchers like these require a host operating system like Windows to operate.

Puppy linux is very cool. I know Ubuntu and other linux distro's allow you to boot off a pen drive, however IMHO none do it better than Puppy linux. You can install Puppy on a pen drive 2 ways. Both ways boot off the pen drive. You can install it to leave files on your hard drive giving it a larger storage capacity. This will also allow Puppy to run faster.
The second way (the way I use Puppy) Uses the computer memory only and will not write files to the hard drive. After you shut down it will then write any changes to your pen drive. I am using a 1 gig pen drive for Puppy linux and I still have 500 megs of storage left. Puppy is very light and weighs in at 140 megs. Very nice to have if a friend needs help accessing a computer that won't boot.

Cheers
Wdhpr

Ritho 25. Jan 2010 06:21 AM

Long ago, back in the "dark" days, that is before the bright birth of our site here, I remember Gizmo himself writing in his newsletter about going laptop-less (Thankfully not just top-less! :eek:) on vacation with just a pen drive. Portable apps have made a lot of progress since then. I doubt the days will ever come when all Windows programs are as simple as 1. Download 2. Unzip anywhere you want and 3. Run it, but there has certainly been a lot of apps that have joined the no-install-necessary ranks.

"Long ago.....?" Okay I know it has only been a couple of years or so, but it sure feels like a long time. It would be interesting to find out how many of our users/members here used to be original subscribers to the TechSupportAlert Newsletter.

miskairal 25. Jan 2010 08:54 AM

I have just returned from a week away where I took hundreds of photos of my brand spanking new granddaughter. I had my browser on my USB along with a portable email programme and other bits and pieces but forgot to take a graphics editor. All I wanted to do was send some cropped and resized baby pics to my Mum and do you think I could achieve that on my daughter in law's pc? Nope. Next time I will be taking photofiltre (or similar) with me.

It really is wonderful to have all your own bookmarks and other favourite software with you though and so much more convenient than taking a whole laptop/netbook.

Ritho 25. Jan 2010 11:19 AM

Aha! I just found a victim.
 
@ Miskairal would you do something for me? As a portable apps user, would you compare Photofiltre portable, with Sunlitgreen PhotoEdit and let me know which one would have met your needs the best.
http://www.softpedia.com/get/Multime...Portable.shtml
I am afraid that having used advanced programs for so long, I have a hard time judging what an average user might be interested in.

I ran across Sunlightgreen's programs recently and they look pretty good. I have been thinking of including a good portable app in my Best Free Digital Image Editor reviews.

Anybody have another portable image editor they like?

miskairal 28. Apr 2011 08:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ritho (Post 21138)
@ Miskairal would you do something for me? As a portable apps user, would you compare Photofiltre portable, with Sunlitgreen PhotoEdit and let me know which one would have met your needs the best.
http://www.softpedia.com/get/Multime...Portable.shtml

I am so sorry Ritho, I didn't see your post until now. Looking at the date it is when my sweet little dog was killed by wild dogs and I was a bit of a mess for a long time after. I shall do as you ask over the weekend I hope and get back to you. I am familiar with GIMP as well but don't like to use it just to crop and resize. In fact I have tried many freebies over the years for this simple chore but always return to Photofiltre.

Ritho 28. Apr 2011 10:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by miskairal (Post 51157)
I am so sorry Ritho, I didn't see your post until now. Looking at the date it is when my sweet little dog was killed by wild dogs and I was a bit of a mess for a long time after. I shall do as you ask over the weekend I hope and get back to you. I am familiar with GIMP as well but don't like to use it just to crop and resize. In fact I have tried many freebies over the years for this simple chore but always return to Photofiltre.

Thanks, it is/was no big deal. To tell the truth I had totally forgotton this post and about Sunlitgreen or I would have just tried it out myself. I think it was something I had just run across at the time an was on my mind when I read your post.

miskairal 30. Apr 2011 10:57 PM

Sunlightgreen is a nifty little programme Ritho especially for simply cropping and resizing. It did ask me to install something.....to do with faces....but it was simply a choice of clicking OK or cancel to leave it out (no checkboxes to uncheck). The only thing that Photofiltre has, and sunlight does not, that I do occasionally use is the ability to add text to pics.

rikishi19 02. May 2011 12:43 AM

I've never used those two mentioned programs before, but IrfanView is another one to add into the hat, for simple editing functions such as cropping and resizing.

wdhpr 08. Sep 2011 12:23 AM

Puppy's pretty cool indeed. :)
Been using it for around 2 years now, all from a 1gb sub drive still have around 250mb left. It truly comes into its own to help access a computer that wont boot. I have an 8gb usb drive that I'm going to install Puppy on so I can copy personal files from a hopelessly broken Windoze. It works so good I should start renting out my Puppy:D

Exshail 24. Feb 2012 05:21 PM

can you provide details like download link for puppy linux & how to set up to boot from pen drive?

wdhpr 24. Feb 2012 06:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Exshail (Post 69549)
can you provide details like download link for puppy linux & how to set up to boot from pen drive?

Here is a link from Pendrivelinux that explains the process. I have found the Universal installer works well for me however there are other like UNetbootin

Hope this helps

Panzer 25. Feb 2012 08:43 AM

If you want to make Multiboot USB, you can use these tools:

XBoot:
http://sites.google.com/site/shamurxboot/home

Yumi:
http://www.pendrivelinux.com/yumi-mu...t-usb-creator/

Multiboot Live USB (supports more Distros than Yumi, alows user to make multiboot USB from Linux, CD/DVD (I think it's modified Ubuntu Distro) and VirtualBox:
http://translate.google.com/translat...26prmd%3Dimvns

Exshail 25. Feb 2012 01:57 PM

Thanks for the info, now I can boot from pendrive (by using unetbootin)
The only problem I have face is it is not automatically configure my USB Lan card, so I can't use net browsing.

From my WIN OS I found below 2 Network Adapter under Device Manger, but how i could configure in puppy to connect NET? This modules are not found in puppy's auto load modules features.

1. Atheros AR8151 PCI-E Gigabit Ethernet Controller (NDIS 6.20)
2. Wireless Lite-N Client Adapter.

wdhpr 25. Feb 2012 09:20 PM

Another alternative is to Install Bodhi Linux on your USB drive. A member of the forum (MidnightCowboy) found this link at the Bodhi Linux Forum which allows it to run in persistent mode. If I remember correctly the new version of Bodhi added additional support for wireless connections. Due to his experience with wireless connection s you may want to PM him and see if he can help .
Good Luck

Exshail 26. Feb 2012 04:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wdhpr (Post 69634)
Another alternative is to Install Bodhi Linux on your USB drive. A member of the forum (MidnightCowboy) found this link at the Bodhi Linux Forum which allows it to run in persistent mode. If I remember correctly the new version of Bodhi added additional support for wireless connections. Due to his experience with wireless connection s you may want to PM him and see if he can help .
Good Luck

Thanks for the tip. BTW I tried Ubuntu & it automatically detect my usb lan & now I'm writing from it.

wdhpr 26. Feb 2012 05:37 AM

Thats great
I wasn't sure how big your USB drive was so I didn't suggest Ubuntu. I put Bodhi on an 8GB thumb drive which is about a 400 MB download which left me allot of room so I could help friends recover important files on a computer that won't boot or to just introduce them to Linux. The thing about Bodhi is its a minimalistic distro and doesn't come with much in the way of applications so not the ideal distro for newcomers. Anyway I'm glad Ubuntu is working for you :)

Exshail 27. Feb 2012 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wdhpr (Post 69646)
Thats great
I wasn't sure how big your USB drive was so I didn't suggest Ubuntu. I put Bodhi on an 8GB thumb drive which is about a 400 MB download which left me allot of room so I could help friends recover important files on a computer that won't boot or to just introduce them to Linux. The thing about Bodhi is its a minimalistic distro and doesn't come with much in the way of applications so not the ideal distro for newcomers. Anyway I'm glad Ubuntu is working for you :)


Infact my USB is only 1 GB (one GB). BTW yet I don't know whether it is a portable OS or not. Want to know, if any OS changes will be preserved in my 1 GB pen drive (still have space for 250 mb) & same bootable pen drive works with other machine?

I like puppy similar to window as 3 system buttons are on top right hand side of any window.

wdhpr 27. Feb 2012 11:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Exshail
Infact my USB is only 1 GB (one GB). BTW yet I don't know whether it is a portable OS or not. Want to know, if any OS changes will be preserved in my 1 GB pen drive (still have space for 250 mb) & same bootable pen drive works with other machine?

1GB is very small for Ubuntu I'm actually surprised it fit. Unless you set it up as persistent it will not save your changes to the USB drive. Read this for persistent explained

Puppy Linux in persistent mode will fit on a 1GB drive comfortably. I actually ran Puppy for a couple of years on a 1GB drive but I was limited on what I could use it for such as retrieving files on a computer that could no longer boot into windows.

I suggest you spend some time at the pendrivelinux web site and become more familiar with how the whole process works. I would also suggest getting a bigger USB drive. For example Bodhi Linux should be installed on at least a 2GB thumb drive. I'm not trying to push Bodhi Linux but I easily installed it by using a live CD. I directed the install to the USB drive instead of a hard drive but be absolutely sure it installs on the USB drive otherwise it will destroy the MBR on your HDD. Anyway I was able to save all my changes to my USB drive just like it would on a HDD. Thumb drives are getting cheaper now days I picked up a 8GB drive for $25.00 US. There are more options available on the bigger USB drives and it will also allow you to add a good number of applications with room to spare or run linux distro's that are compatible with your wireless system.

*Note* not all USB drives operate correctly as boot-able. Read here for Recommended USB Linux flash drives

Enjoy:)

Panzer 28. Feb 2012 10:15 AM

Winbootic:
http://www.wintobootic.com/

Rufus:
http://rufus.akeo.ie/

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/1204...musb-with-gui/

Panzer 02. Mar 2012 11:37 AM

LiveUSB Install:
http://live.learnfree.eu/


# install hundreds of Linux distributions
# automatically download distributions from Internet – no need to download the ISO-image yourself!
# multiplatform – runs on Linux AND Windows
# created entirely with Free Software tools – Python, GTK, GIMP, Inkscape
# create “persistent” installs of Ubuntu and Debian-based distributions (so your documents are not lost after you reboot the thumb drive)
# can format flash drives bigger than 32GB

WARNING! 3/41 on Virus Total. Maybe false positives, maybe not ...

Exshail 04. Mar 2012 06:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wdhpr (Post 69728)
1GB is very small for Ubuntu I'm actually surprised it fit. Unless you set it up as persistent it will not save your changes to the USB drive. Read this for persistent explained

Puppy Linux in persistent mode will fit on a 1GB drive comfortably. I actually ran Puppy for a couple of years on a 1GB drive but I was limited on what I could use it for such as retrieving files on a computer that could no longer boot into windows.

I suggest you spend some time at the pendrivelinux web site and become more familiar with how the whole process works. I would also suggest getting a bigger USB drive. For example Bodhi Linux should be installed on at least a 2GB thumb drive. I'm not trying to push Bodhi Linux but I easily installed it by using a live CD. I directed the install to the USB drive instead of a hard drive but be absolutely sure it installs on the USB drive otherwise it will destroy the MBR on your HDD. Anyway I was able to save all my changes to my USB drive just like it would on a HDD. Thumb drives are getting cheaper now days I picked up a 8GB drive for $25.00 US. There are more options available on the bigger USB drives and it will also allow you to add a good number of applications with room to spare or run linux distro's that are compatible with your wireless system.

*Note* not all USB drives operate correctly as boot-able. Read here for Recommended USB Linux flash drives

Enjoy:)

Thanks for the Tips, I tried Bodhi Linux, but at first bootup it works & next bootup it has a problem & many times I format Kingston 8 GB pen drive & again installed Bodhi Linux on it, but same problem. BTW it still not detect my USB Lan, but In one laptop with wired telephone line I can connect to Internet.

Wary puppy also not detect my USB Lan however it detect wired telephon modem in other machine.

I think I should go for multiboot options suggested by panzer, so if one destro doesn't work switch to others.

wdhpr 04. Mar 2012 08:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Exshail
Thanks for the Tips, I tried Bodhi Linux, but at first bootup it works & next bootup it has a problem & many times I format Kingston 8 GB pen drive & again installed Bodhi Linux on it, but same problem. BTW it still not detect my USB Lan, but In one laptop with wired telephone line I can connect to Internet.

I wonder if the problem is with your USB drive. Did you check out these recommended USB drive?. I tried a 4GB Kingston and my computer had a hard time recognizing it. I bought a 8GB Sandisk and it worked with no issues. Have you ensured you have booting from a USB drive enabled in your BIOS? I had to change my BIOS and I also have to tap the F10 key (may vary with other computers)at boot-up and select the USB drive I have plugged into the computer.

Thirteenth 22. Mar 2012 01:04 AM

oh wow this is cool :D like the raspberry Pi computer

Exshail 03. Apr 2012 06:23 PM

I tried Racy puppy downloaded from below page on 1 gb pen drive. It is easily get connected to the internet with wireless usb also.

http://puppylinuxnews.org/home/new-racy-puppy/

Panzer 05. Apr 2012 10:28 AM

Another possibility is to make 2 partitions (or more) using Bootice (http://agnipulse.com/2011/11/partition-usb-flash-drive/). Put your Distro on one of them and use second as a storage for your files (FAT or NTFS, it doesn't matter).

In Linux, both will be seen (if not, use Disk Utility to mount them), while in Windows, only one will be seen (that ones with files in it). So, you can swap files between Windows and Linux easily so you do not have to use Linux every time you need some file.

wdhpr 05. Apr 2012 07:21 PM

I guess there is more than one way to skin the proverbial cat. I've been running linux for years off USB drives and during that times I have found that it can be as complicated or as simple that you make it to be. I choose to do things simply and in doing so I also use quality USB drives along with tried and true methods for installing linux distro's on to that thumb drive. I have always used pendrivelinux as my guide and it has always worked without a hitch.

I guess it can be said that one size does not fit all but then were talking about linux on a USB drive not shoes.

Cheers :)

Panzer 06. Apr 2012 08:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Panzer (Post 71359)
Another possibility is to make 2 partitions (or more) using Bootice (http://agnipulse.com/2011/11/partition-usb-flash-drive/). Put your Distro on one of them and use second as a storage for your files (FAT or NTFS, it doesn't matter).

In Linux, both will be seen (if not, use Disk Utility to mount them), while in Windows, only one will be seen (that ones with files in it). So, you can swap files between Windows and Linux easily so you do not have to use Linux every time you need some file.

If, for some reason, BOOTICE doesn't work properly with your USB, try this two methods instead:

- use Diskmod (http://agnipulse.com/2012/03/filter-...-disk-windows/)

- make a NTFS partition as first and FAT as second (and put a live Distro on second one). Both will be seen in Linux, but just first with NTFS (which you will use as storage) will be seen in Windows.

Panzer 07. Apr 2012 09:09 AM

Another reason why to use Linux on USB with 2 partitions is that if your persistant overlay file gets full (and you don't notice that until it is too late), your USB won't boot anymore. So it is better to have all your files on another partition. That way, you can use Disk Utility from Live Linux CD and format the partition with Linux. The next step is that you put your Linux Distro on newly formatted partition and off you go. Files on NTFS won't be affected by this.

You can try Overlay Recovery, but this method can destroy all your data ...

Panzer 08. Apr 2012 06:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Panzer (Post 71378)

- make a NTFS partition as first and FAT as second (and put a live Distro on second one). Both will be seen in Linux, but just first with NTFS (which you will use as storage) will be seen in Windows.

EDIT: This method doesn't work because you can only bo-ot from the first partition on the USB and not from the second.

wdhpr 10. Apr 2012 01:15 AM

Dedoimedo Just posted a how-to on making a USB drive in persistence mode. He offers several methods and is quite simple to understand. Its well worth a look. :)

10. Apr 2012 02:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wdhpr (Post 71475)
Dedoimedo Just posted a how-to on making a USB drive in persistence mode. He offers several methods and is quite simple to understand. Its well worth a look. :)

Nice article; simple and clear.

It would be nice to get something similar on Gizmo's Freeware perhaps expanded to cover a couple of other persistent version creation tools.

I'd also think it useful to show how to create a customized distro based on an existing installation that the user has configured with his own selection of software and other personal customizations.


Maybe Dedoimedo would be interested in doing this in exchange for links back to his site.

Gizmo

wdhpr 10. Apr 2012 03:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ianjrichards
I'd also think it useful to show how to create a customized distro based on an existing installation that the user has configured with his own selection of software and other personal customizations.

As you are already aware of Remastersys which you highlighted in your post Make Your Own Customized Bootable Linux Live CD (or USB Stick) in theory this software is designed to do just that. I have attempted to create a customized live cd this way but the results were not too good. I get by, because I have found that I can install a linux distro and have it configured to my liking in about an hours time. (the true beauty of linux).

I seem to remember Dedoimedo has done some work for this sight in the past and so if we were to ask pretty please we may get him to write a more thorough step-by-step guide for using Remastersys. :)

1002richards 10. Apr 2012 05:19 AM

Hi,
I have in my bookmarks Dedoimedo's guide to Remastersys but it seems quite old as the screenshots refer to Ubuntu 8.04. Still useful though: http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/remastersys.html

Richard.

wdhpr 11. Apr 2012 01:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1002richards (Post 71484)
Hi,
I have in my bookmarks Dedoimedo's guide to Remastersys but it seems quite old as the screenshots refer to Ubuntu 8.04. Still useful though: http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/remastersys.html

Richard.

It looks like a thorough how-to. I can see I missed a few things when I last tried Remastersys. I'm thinking I might give it another shot. As I said in my above post, I can put together a Linux distro to my liking in about an hours time. One thing I do see how Remastersys could be helpful would be to use it for putting together a linux platform that may be usable for a new Linux user although a distro like Zorin is geared towards that sort of thing.

1002richards 11. Apr 2012 06:32 AM

I use Remastersys as a back-up. When I've got things set up as I like them and there's been a kernel update (for instance) I run off another back-up DVD using Remastersys - just in case!
I also back-up to external media the .iso file each time. (Yes, I like back-ups!!!)

Richard

MidnightCowboy 11. Apr 2012 06:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ianjrichards (Post 71477)


Maybe Dedoimedo would be interested in doing this in exchange for links back to his site.

Gizmo

I'll ask him :)

wdhpr 11. Apr 2012 08:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Richard
I use Remastersys as a back-up. When I've got things set up as I like them and there's been a kernel update (for instance) I run off another back-up DVD using Remastersys - just in case!
I also back-up to external media the .iso file each time. (Yes, I like back-ups!!!)

Richard

Backups are Must... and I like them too :) Actually I try to do a weekly differential image using a commercial imaging program. Knock on wood this has never failed me other than loosing a few e-mails. The nice thing is that I can also mount the image so I can retrieve files if needed.
A linux OS image takes about 20 minutes afterward that the differential takes a few minutes.
Quote:

Originally Posted by MC
Quote:
Originally Posted by ianjrichards View Post


Maybe Dedoimedo would be interested in doing this in exchange for links back to his site.

Gizmo
I'll ask him

I already did, he said his projects are overlapping but he will see what he can do.

Dedoimedo 13. Apr 2012 01:06 PM

Hi guys,

Here am I, will you send me an angel ...

Seriously, I know there's my own older remastersys tutorial, a remastersys tutorial here, some live cd info here and my own article from a week back, so that's the overlap I was thinking of.

Now, perhaps this could be a linux live cd image management tutorial?
How to create and manage images in a portable fashion?

And I have a multi-boot-usb article coming up in a week or so, so this could also blend nicely. So perhaps something that combines all various tools and utilities for managing live utilities, some multi-booting and finally a review of remastering tools that focus on creating givable customized images - not from the self-backup angle - with specific focus on remastersys?

What do you think?

Cheers,
Dedoimedo

wdhpr 13. Apr 2012 09:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dedoimedo
finally a review of remastering tools that focus on creating givable customized images - not from the self-backup angle - with specific focus on remastersys?

If I understand your correctly than Perhaps this method could help create a Linux distro custom built for a friend or family member. Could this be done inspite of the different hardware it may encounter?

Dedoimedo 13. Apr 2012 09:49 PM

That's the beauty of Linux. Dynamic loading of kernel modules. When the kernel comes up, unneeded components are simply not used, and those that are needed are inserted into memory. So in theory, you're 100% portable.

The only problem could be with special hardware that Linux does not contain, nor your remastered copy. Say proprietary ati drivers, when you have only nvidia. In that case, they will have to run an update on first use to get to full.

Dedoimedo


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