Gizmos Freeware Reviews  

Go Back   Gizmo's Freeware Forum > Freeware Forum > Mobile Apps

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 19. Dec 2012, 04:24 AM   #1 (permalink)
Site Manager
 
MidnightCowboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: South American Banana Republic, third bunch from the left
Posts: 15,186
Default Android mobiles hit by spamming virus

Just goes to show how malware writers are now concentrating their efforts onto mobile platforms.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20768996
__________________
Buy a Hoover and prove technology sucks.
MidnightCowboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19. Dec 2012, 04:46 AM   #2 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 153
Default

In regards to this quote from the article:
Quote:
The copies of the games were held on a server in China rather than on the main Google Play store
Does this mean that they were installed from a different source other than the Play Store, or that the Play Store was somehow 'hijacked' and the dowload from the Play Store was redirected to the China server anonymously?
rikishi19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19. Dec 2012, 05:27 AM   #3 (permalink)
Site Manager
 
MidnightCowboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: South American Banana Republic, third bunch from the left
Posts: 15,186
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rikishi19 View Post
In regards to this quote from the article: Does this mean that they were installed from a different source other than the Play Store, or that the Play Store was somehow 'hijacked' and the dowload from the Play Store was redirected to the China server anonymously?
According to the article, users responded to "offers" to download free games after receiving such a message. As I understand it, these were then supplied as infected code from the source highlighted.
__________________
Buy a Hoover and prove technology sucks.
MidnightCowboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19. Dec 2012, 01:10 PM   #4 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,028
Default

There are 2 things that strike me in that article:
1. The success of the malware writer is dependent on exploiting the gullibility of people. Now the article does end with this advice...
Quote:
To help protect themselves, Android owners were urged to be wary of unexpected messages that offer free versions of apps which are usually sold.
...but how many people do we know wouldn't be taken-in by such "too good to be true" messages? The fact is malware writers continue to target this inherent weakness in people (in general) because there is a certain amount of success in that strategy.

2. On this thread, we were just discussing how careful we have to be about granting permissions in Android - particularly suspicious and "out-of-context" ones. Here in this article we see the same issue cropping-up...
Quote:
After the app is downloaded users must disable some safeguards, grant the app permission to install and give it the ability to browse the web or send texts messages before it will run.
Taking just one of those as an example: What in the heck does a game want permission to send text messages for?

The malware writer knows that many people are lax and just 'click-click-click', so yet another human vulnerability is being targeted.
On the whole, although I still consider myself a noob, I'd say malware writers aren't stupid. In fact, they are brilliant because they understand human behavior and inherent weaknesses. It just a pity that people who are so talented couldn't put their effort to better use.
Joe A.TT is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.