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-   -   How to use OpenDNS in Linux? (https://www.techsupportalert.com/freeware-forum/linux/903-how-to-use-opendns-in-linux.html)

bk_7312 25. May 2009 10:34 AM

How to use OpenDNS in Linux?
 
Anyone know how to use OpenDNS on Linux? Their website did show you how to do it with Ubuntu and OpenSuSE but what about other distros (like Mepis or Puppy Linux or Mandriva and etc)?

Thanks in advance

debtboy 25. May 2009 01:54 PM

Hi bk_7312,
Are you familiar with the command line?

If so you can modify the /etc/resolv.conf file.
Just comment out the existing nameservers and add the openDNS ones.

This "should" :confused: work for most all Linux distros,
but depends on netcofig and some other configuration factors.

Note:
Do not add any blank lines when adding the new nameservers. ;)

bk_7312 26. May 2009 07:38 AM

Thanks debtboy,

I can't say I'm familiar with the command line but I'm getting the hang of it thanks to your other thread about command lines. But I didn't change my nameserver to OpenDNS nameserver using the command line, I changed it using KWrite as root after finding that file using Konqueror.

Both More or Less did a fine job viewing files but I find Vi a bit confusing to use since backspace, delete and some other keys function a bit differently, might take a while to get used to (plus I don't know how to save it yet).

debtboy 26. May 2009 06:13 PM

Yes vi takes some getting used to :D

It's on almost all Linux/Unix systems and very fast (when you get used to it).

Here is a vi cheatsheet for reference.
http://www.lagmonster.org/docs/vi.html

It's very common to use a text based editor like vi after you telnet into a server. (no GUI available)

To aviod an all out war, I have to mention emacs :o
If you ever used Wordstar you will probably like emacs. ;)

The rivalry between vi and emacs is legendary among the Linux community!!!

Glad you were able to use a graphical editor like Kwrite (KDE).

bk_7312 28. May 2009 09:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by debtboy (Post 5692)
Yes vi takes some getting used to :D

It's on almost all Linux/Unix systems and very fast (when you get used to it).

Here is a vi cheatsheet for reference.
http://www.lagmonster.org/docs/vi.html

It's very common to use a text based editor like vi after you telnet into a server. (no GUI available)

To aviod an all out war, I have to mention emacs :o
If you ever used Wordstar you will probably like emacs. ;)

The rivalry between vi and emacs is legendary among the Linux community!!!

Glad you were able to use a graphical editor like Kwrite (KDE).

How do you access emacs? To access vi I just type vi filetoedit, tried emacs filetoedit but Konsole says bash: emacs: command not found. Tried man vi, shows a description of vi and stuff like that; tried man emacs, shows No manual entry for emacs.

One more thing, I don't know how or why but /etc/resolv.conf seems to have reseted itself. I had to change the nameservers again (which is a piece of cake now) to use OpenDNS again. Maybe this has something to do with my network configuration or something but I'm fine with it (for now), I'll look into this later (when I get annoyed).

debtboy 28. May 2009 01:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bk_7312 (Post 5749)
How do you access emacs? To access vi I just type vi filetoedit, tried emacs filetoedit but Konsole says bash: emacs: command not found. Tried man vi, shows a description of vi and stuff like that; tried man emacs, shows No manual entry for emacs.

One more thing, I don't know how or why but /etc/resolv.conf seems to have reseted itself. I had to change the nameservers again (which is a piece of cake now) to use OpenDNS again. Maybe this has something to do with my network configuration or something but I'm fine with it (for now), I'll look into this later (when I get annoyed).

Ah yes,
your /etc/resolv.conf being rewritten has to do with your configuration.
If you are configured (which I expect you are) to obtain DNS addresses automatically
a program will extract the DNS from your Internet provider and write that to resolv.conf

You can fix this many ways...

You can change to a dedicated DNS setting
(Your GUI probably has this capability)

You can modify the program that writes to your resolv.conf
(this sounds worse than it is, it's probably just another config file to modify)
(this procedure may be distro dependent, not universal to all Linux)

A simple way might be to change the permissions on your resolv.conf to:
r--r--r-- which would require the following:
su root it will ask for a password
Now as root chmod 444 /etc/resolv.conf
(making it read only) ;)

However you fix it, your now on the path to configuring your own custom Linux system!!! :D
Linux IMHO is not meant to be used right out of the box, it's meant to be configured,
why else would you have almost unlimited configurability!!


As for emacs, I thought most distros installed it, but maybe not.
I assume the executable would be in your path...
I'll get back to you later on this one, I'm not using a "Linux Box"
right now and don't have access to one. :(

debtboy 28. May 2009 11:03 PM

How about that,
It appears that many distros don't install emacs by default,
but still include it in their packages.

Installing software from packages is very easy on the command line,
but there is usually some kind of GUI available also.
Either way installing packages is distro dependent,
(.rpm, .deb, etc...) while installing from source is universal for all.

I will demonstrate compiling and installing a third party application
from source in the next few days on the command line thread. ;)
This is a very simple process, just a few commands.

wdhpr 29. May 2009 01:18 AM

Quote:

I will demonstrate compiling and installing a third party application
from source in the next few days on the command line thread.
This is a very simple process, just a few commands.
debtboy

That would be great.
I use mepis which is Debian based. Lately I have been having a tough time dealing with all the dependencies.

Cheers

bk_7312 29. May 2009 06:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by debtboy (Post 5751)
Ah yes,
your /etc/resolv.conf being rewritten has to do with your configuration.
If you are configured (which I expect you are) to obtain DNS addresses automatically
a program will extract the DNS from your Internet provider and write that to resolv.conf

You can fix this many ways...

You can change to a dedicated DNS setting
(Your GUI probably has this capability)

You can modify the program that writes to your resolv.conf
(this sounds worse than it is, it's probably just another config file to modify)
(this procedure may be distro dependent, not universal to all Linux)

A simple way might be to change the permissions on your resolv.conf to:
r--r--r-- which would require the following:
su root it will ask for a password
Now as root chmod 444 /etc/resolv.conf
(making it read only) ;)

However you fix it, your now on the path to configuring your own custom Linux system!!! :D
Linux IMHO is not meant to be used right out of the box, it's meant to be configured,
why else would you have almost unlimited configurability!!

Thanks debtboy,

I change /etc/resolv.conf permission to read-only but I can still modify it as root and so can the program that modifies /etc/resolv.conf.

I think I took the easy way out, I open MEPIS Network Assistant (already built in on MEPIS, the Linux I currently use as dual-boot) and change from using DHCP to static for both DNS and IP settings. Had a little trouble with the IP part but it's all fixed.

I didn't realise I could change the DNS using MEPIS Network Assistant until now...:D what a fool I was but it's worth learning how to change the DNS using the command line.

bk_7312 29. May 2009 07:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by debtboy (Post 5768)
Installing software from packages is very easy on the command line,
but there is usually some kind of GUI available also.
Either way installing packages is distro dependent,
(.rpm, .deb, etc...) while installing from source is universal for all.

I will demonstrate compiling and installing a third party application
from source in the next few days on the command line thread. ;)
This is a very simple process, just a few commands.

Cool, can't wait for the next lesson! Does this mean we can install packages designed for other distros (or even other window managers) into any Linux we want to as long as we have the source code? I, like wdhpr, would also like to learn about dependencies and lib files that are required when you install new packages.


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