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Old 07. Aug 2011, 06:02 PM   #1 (permalink)
emmjay
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Default USB Flash drive for Ubuntu

I have Ubuntu on a CD (version 10.4) which works well on my XP/SP3 laptop. I am looking at downloading the latest version of Ubuntu to a USB Flash Drive to use on my W7/32 system. Is there a recommended USB Flash drive size that I should purchase. Will a 16GB unit be enough? And I guess I should ask if there are any specific features on the USB Flash drive that would be a prerequisite for using Ubuntu in this manner. NB: I have never owned a USB flash drive before.
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Old 07. Aug 2011, 06:38 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Have a look here pay particular attention to step 2. "Burn your CD or create a USB drive"

(it will ask)
would like to create a:

Click on USB stick

Then click on "Show me how"
It will show you need at least a 2 gig USB drive
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Old 07. Aug 2011, 10:21 PM   #3 (permalink)
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2 GB, great. I will get the 16GB.
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Old 08. Aug 2011, 01:20 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Just bought a 8 gb SanDisk for $12.00 US.
I remember back in the late 80's I spent $250.00 for a 80 mb hard drive for my Amiga 1200. For a FPU and time clock plus a 2 mb memory upgrade cost me $150.00
When I think about its hard to believe how quickly things have changed in a 25 years.

PS: For a great source of info and know-hows have a look at pindrivelinux

Cheers
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Old 08. Aug 2011, 08:21 AM   #5 (permalink)
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As general advice, if like me you use UNetbootin, beware if you have an external USB drive that it writes to your flash drive and not to this. I always switch my external drive off just to be safe.
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Old 08. Aug 2011, 07:27 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Tnx guys for the advise. I need to do some research.

I use public WiFi when on the road and I have always used my W7 laptop for this. A friend advised to use my Linux Live CD for this purpose (more secure and I can still get to FF). Another friend told me to use a flash USB instead. This will be something new for me to try. I assume I have to put the full install on the the flash drive, not just the installer if I want to do this.

Got a Kingston GT3 16GB for $24 just this morning. I chose this one for the brand name (good reputation). There were other brands higher and lower in price but as I am new to this line of hardware, I stuck with a name I knew. I will scan it for shop malware before I use it. MBAM should do the job, I hope.
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Old 09. Aug 2011, 02:10 AM   #7 (permalink)
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hm, if you are sticking the usb into public computers to boot linux, I'd recomend getting a read only usb stick (well one that can switch between read only and read/write)

this way you can make sure nothing gets onto usb stick so it's clean the next time you stick it into somewhere dirty

Kanguru usb sticks have the write lock switch in them, they are a bit pricey but you shouldn't need more than 1 anyways and they'll last years/lifetime if you aren't piling music/movies on them

SD cards have write switches on them too, just get a card reader for the usb and it works well, I've just noticed that doing it this way, linux kind of lags a bit, the cards aren't as fast on reading speed as usb sticks I think, though this could be my sd card and not all in general.
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Old 10. Aug 2011, 03:33 AM   #8 (permalink)
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To follow on a little from the OP's question, to the use of persistent and the space to allow.

If you install a new program or update an existing one, does this take up space in the persistent file or in the space otherwise left on the usb stick? ie when setting the size of the persistent file in relation to the stick, which way do I allow for future downloads upgrades?
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Old 10. Aug 2011, 07:05 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syntax_error View Post
To follow on a little from the OP's question, to the use of persistent and the space to allow.

If you install a new program or update an existing one, does this take up space in the persistent file or in the space otherwise left on the usb stick? ie when setting the size of the persistent file in relation to the stick, which way do I allow for future downloads upgrades?
I use Puppy Linux from a USB in the persistent mode and while it shuts down it write all changes to my USB drive. There are two ways to use Persistent: Write changes to the hard drive or write changes to the USB drive. It will give the option during setup.
There is a ton of tutorials and resources at PenDriveLinux
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Old 13. Sep 2011, 04:56 PM   #10 (permalink)
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My flash drive worked well the first time I used it and then I got desktop problems. My audio is dreadful and the screen is dull. When I bought the flash drive it showed that it supported Windows and Linux so I assumed the problems were not related to the flash drive. I downloaded the latest version of Ubuntu (11.x) to the drive and followed the instructions.

My laptop is Linux 'ready' but not Linux 'certified' ... not sure if this has anything to do with it ... and not sure what that actually means.

As my Ubuntu Live CD (V10.4) worked great on this laptop I decided to get V10 downloaded onto another flash drive I bought to see if my laptop would work any differently. I have had no problems with this version. Does that mean that my laptop is the problem, say drivers etc.?

If I chose Puppy Linux would that be a better way for me to go? I have W7 installed on this laptop and I only use Linux on the road to check my email and do some quick FF searches.
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