Gizmo's Freeware Forum

Gizmo's Freeware Forum (https://www.techsupportalert.com/freeware-forum/)
-   Linux (https://www.techsupportalert.com/freeware-forum/linux/)
-   -   Ubuntu 10.10 (https://www.techsupportalert.com/freeware-forum/linux/5407-ubuntu-10-10-a.html)

1002richards 05. Dec 2011 08:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ratzo (Post 64740)
Well That is interesting to hear since being a long time user of windows i find it much simpler to reinstall windows (without product key ) than any Linux distro so I guess it is what one gets used to . So perhaps you could write a step by step article .
Linux land is a strange land , well that could be a good thing as less folks will venture into it lol

I reinstalled Vista on Sat on my son's laptop as we're considering trading it in - this took hours & two DVDs, plus two service packs & updates to d/l & install.

For Ubuntu install 1 CD and approx 20 mins. So as requested ...
..... Excellent guide with screenshots here for a dual boot http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/installing

MidnightCowboy 06. Dec 2011 06:01 AM

The situation I encounter quite regularly is that folks take the plunge with a dual boot and usually end up with Ubuntu which is massive here in Brazil. Once they get stuck into this they usually branch out into trying other distros. Often they then want to replace Ubuntu with something else but are worried about messing up their Windows partition in the process.

The only important part is finding out exactly what you have installed and where. This you can do with this command:

$ sudo fdisk -l

This is the input from my own machine:

http://img269.imageshack.us/img269/4403/disky.png

Here you can see my Windows occupying the first two, and Linux the second pair.

Some distros make this process really simple. Kororaa for instance which IMO is the best KDE Linux offers to "replace existing Linux" as a default option. You simply accept this and you're done :)

Others usually prompt you to wipe your disk completely (which you don't want), install alongside other operating systems (which in this case won't work), or "something else". You need to choose the something else or "manual" option and then assign your new Linux to the right partition. In the case of this example it will be "sdb5". This you must select, format by ticking the box and most importantly change to "ext4" file system from the drop down choices. You'll also need to accept the prompts to unmount existing partitions, and then finally write the changes to disk.

With some distros this is enough as they will automatically recognise the existing "swap" area. If not, you will receive another prompt for this when you try to go ahead. In this case, just go back, select (in this example only) "sdb6", click to "change" and then assign as swap area from the drop down choices, and go ahead again.

I've made maybe 20 replacement Linux installs into the same dual booted system and not once has my Windows 7 refused to also boot afterwards.

Different distros will present this information in slightly different ways so this is just a general guide.

kendall.a 06. Dec 2011 07:16 AM

MC, this is simply brilliant! Please consider expanding upon it and making it a full-fledged article!

This is exactly what has kept me from "playing around" with Linux on my main, Windows 7, machine--my fear and paranoia of ruining my Windows 7 partition.

Instead, I've been stuck with playing with Linux on a 6-7 year old anemic laptop. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy it. But, I think I'd really like to see how Linux runs on my new (2-3 year old) "gaming" desktop with a great video card....

MidnightCowboy 06. Dec 2011 08:08 AM

It's only fair I admit to being no expert in this field. I hope this general guide contains no flaws because it has worked for me, but even so I don't regard myself as competent enough to write a complete instructional article. With all distros being different, the best place to obtain the right data from is their respective forums or wikis. That said, those I've seen only seem to focus on either a single install of Linux to be the sole occupant of the PC, or dual booting with an existing version of Windows.

I'm certain there's a real demand for a more comprehensive "replace by current dual booted Linux with something else" guide, but this really needs the skills of Jojo, Ritho or similar to make it safe.

If you want to see a really beautiful example of KDE done right though, do try Kororaa. Get V15 and not 16 which uses Grub2 because there's been a few issues reported. This will replace your existing Linux with just a few clicks and maintain the integrity of your Windows dual boot. Plus, I can also offer some guidance about changing the looks etc., as I'm familiar with this distro. I'll post an example screenshot in the ChitChat "what does your desktop look like?" thread.

As ever, please make sure any valuable data is backed up first :)

Ratzo 06. Dec 2011 12:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1002richards (Post 64752)
I reinstalled Vista on Sat on my son's laptop as we're considering trading it in - this took hours & two DVDs, plus two service packs & updates to d/l & install.

For Ubuntu install 1 CD and approx 20 mins. So as requested ...
..... Excellent guide with screenshots here for a dual boot http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/installing

I think If you really knew what you were doing or rather how to do it it would have taken you a lot less time

Jojo Yee 06. Dec 2011 02:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MidnightCowboy (Post 64760)
The only important part is finding out exactly what you have installed and where. This you can do with this command:

$ sudo fdisk -l

I also use this command whenever I need to identify partitions by their labels:

$ ls /dev/disk/by-label -g

Sometimes I use GParted if it comes along with a live DVD or USB, click to run it which shows you more info including disk labels.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/4474718/Harddisk-Partition.jpg

Like the above, partition sda 1, 2, 3 are primary partitions, of which the partition labelled eMachines is for Windows 7 system, sda4 is an extended partition containing the following logical partitions:

sda5, used for storing data
sda6, Mint 11 partition
sda9, Mint 12 partition
sda8, Ubuntu partition
sda7, a small partition for swap

MidnightCowboy 06. Dec 2011 02:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ratzo (Post 64787)
I think If you really knew what you were doing or rather how to do it it would have taken you a lot less time

Less time overall for this exercise possibly, but still a lot more than Linux considering all the programs that need downloading, installing, configuring and updating for Windows, especially those that are security related.

Installing a typical (full) Linux distro for me takes around 10 minutes. Updates vary depending on the nature of the release but typically it's still less than it takes me to update a new Windows 7 install. OK, so you'll need flash if it isn't included but considering at least one program of each type is installed by default, the rest is just down to personal preferences. I prefer Evolution or Thunderbird over KMail say, but that's it. Sensors too will need installing and activating in Linux for those who want monitors and meters but this only takes a couple of minutes.

1002richards 06. Dec 2011 08:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ratzo (Post 64787)
I think If you really knew what you were doing or rather how to do it it would have taken you a lot less time

I did and do know what I was doing thank you very much.

J_L 11. Dec 2011 09:26 AM

My 11.10 experience has been better than the last version overall, except for the buggy upgrade procedure.


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:56 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.