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View Poll Results: What is your favorite linux distro?
CentOS 1 1.59%
Debian 1 1.59%
Fedora 4 6.35%
Mandriva 1 1.59%
MEPIS 1 1.59%
Mint 15 23.81%
openSUSE 3 4.76%
PCLinuxOS 3 4.76%
Puppy 3 4.76%
Ubuntu 31 49.21%
Voters: 63. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 14. Mar 2011, 05:12 PM   #51 (permalink)
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I like to separate business and home distros, as they cater to completely different needs. At home, my favorites are ubuntu and opensuse. Recently, both mint and scientific linux are making good progress, but I'm not a quick one to change.

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Old 15. Mar 2011, 02:31 AM   #52 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dedoimedo View Post
I like to separate business and home distros, as they cater to completely different needs. At home, my favorites are ubuntu and opensuse. Recently, both mint and scientific linux are making good progress, but I'm not a quick one to change.

Dedoimedo
I have noticed there are those that change distro's nearly as often as they change their socks. (this may vary from person to person)

At times I am tempted to do the same because I'm fairly new to Linux and I am eager to see what I might be missing. I have decided to stay with a distro for at a least six months before switching to something else. This way I can get a feel for the system so I will have a reference point to judge from. I am thinking about trying Mandriva (a red hat genre) or Mint (another Ubuntu fork) as my next distro. I was also curious about what you find attractive about opensuse.

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Old 16. Mar 2011, 11:04 AM   #53 (permalink)
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There's something solid about opensuse that I like.
It's the attention to tiny (call them corporate) details that you don't see elsewhere.
I guess it's the difference between soho and big companies supporting os.

My primary aims are stability and long-term support.
I don't really care much for bling-bling and I don't change my env.
Ubuntu changes too frequently but compensates with speed and ease.
opensuse changes less, but there's some extra work in certain fields.

Overall, both do the job.

Gonna see if Mint is going to replace Ubuntu forever. Depends on Gnome 3 and Unity thingies. Scientific also sounds good, as it offers an age of support during which you don't need to upgrade or change or break anything.

Cheers,
Dedoimedo
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Old 16. Mar 2011, 01:11 PM   #54 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dedoimedo View Post
Gonna see if Mint is going to replace Ubuntu forever. Depends on Gnome 3 and Unity thingies. Scientific also sounds good, as it offers an age of support during which you don't need to upgrade or change or break anything.
I read your review about Mint 10 quite sometime ago and was quite satisfied with this great distro which I like the most so far.
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Old 16. Mar 2011, 08:23 PM   #55 (permalink)
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Quote:
Ubuntu changes too frequently but compensates with speed and ease.
opensuse changes less, but there's some extra work in certain fields.
Thank you Dedoimedo for the response

I have been using Ubuntu for about 6 months and so far it has worked well for me. But there have already been 4 maybe 5 kernel updates as well as many security related update. Although they all seemed to go well, there have been some minor stability issues. The most notable has been Thunderbird acting buggy.

I am probably going switch to Mint as my next distro because of all of the good things I've heard. Hopefully it will turn out to be a solid choice.

One last thing. Is it me or has Linux made huge improvements in the last couple of years?

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Old 16. Mar 2011, 08:33 PM   #56 (permalink)
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There are two types of changes:

Your mindset
Actual improvements

For people using Linux many years, they have seen these improvements all the time, so the question is, where is the critical turning point? For new users, there's the steep revolution, followed by ups and downs.

I think there is a big change, but it happened in 2007 or early 2008.
I had to compile drivers and such back then, it kind of changed two-three years ago.
Since, Linux has been steadily improving, but no major breakthroughs.

I think it's a good moment to work on stability and standards and not race into the gui game, which can open another round of issues and ups and downs. Unit, Wayland, Gnome 3 - completely bling bling and unnecessary.

Gimme 10 years solid support, please.

Cheers,
Dedoimedo
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Old 16. Mar 2011, 08:58 PM   #57 (permalink)
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Quote:
I think there is a big change, but it happened in 2007 or early 2008.
I had to compile drivers and such back then, it kind of changed two-three years ago.
That may explain this review of Ubuntu 8.o4 Hardy Heron Although updated in 2010 its still a review of a older distro.
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Old 16. Mar 2011, 09:18 PM   #58 (permalink)
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Yes, seems like it.

I rememeber even changing the sources and compiling the wired - not wireless - card for opensuse 10.2, installing nvidia from runlevel 3 and whatnot. NTFS tool and whatnot. That sort of changed in Ubuntu 8.10. Since, the changes are mainly visual and some smoothing up the rough edges.

I think the slowest moving distros are the most sensible choice, the problem is people want purtty vertical space and tabs of top - as if using the mouse scroll is difficult, they don't care for actual functionality.

Anyhow, someone who has used Linux in 1995 probably felt in 2000 like someone who started in 2000 and felt around 2005 or started in 2005 and felt in 2010. This means there's no real progress and it's mental for veterans. The big differentiator are newbies. That can explain Ubuntu Unity and all that nonsense, which is why older users hate it, as they are part the excitement stage and want productivity now.

Well, I'm probably gonna go ape-excrement on Gnome 3 ...

Cheers,
Dedoimedo
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Old 17. Mar 2011, 05:20 AM   #59 (permalink)
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Quote:
Anyhow, someone who has used Linux in 1995 probably felt in 2000 like someone who started in 2000 and felt around 2005 or started in 2005 and felt in 2010. This means there's no real progress and it's mental for veterans. The big differentiator are newbies. That can explain Ubuntu Unity and all that nonsense, which is why older users hate it, as they are part the excitement stage and want productivity now.
So that means the old wise ones don't like all that bling.
They just want something that works.
What a concept

Cheers
Wdhpr

Last edited by wdhpr; 17. Mar 2011 at 05:47 AM.
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Old 31. Aug 2011, 10:49 PM   #60 (permalink)
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I'm an Arch Linux user almost full time, but when I don't feel like building my system from the ground up, I used Linux Mint gnome version. It's functional, fast, and it looks really good. The package repository is massive and the community is very friendly and has a lot of "how to" guides. One of the best parts is that most of the guides found on Ubuntu Forums will actually work with Linux Mint as they run on the same base system.

I also wanted to mention that viruses, similar to Mac operating systems, has very few viruses and little if any known spyware. So your computer is as secure, if not more secure with a good password, with Linux installed. Did we mention linux is free, no strings attached?
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