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06. Nov 2009 08:09 PM

Ubuntu 9.10, the Windows killer..No
 
Ubuntu 9.10 is a major change to earlier 9.x versions. Much touted as a Windows 7 killer, I has chance this afternoon to try it out. I may not be the best judge as I expect things like this to 'just work.'

No problem with the installation, couple of things, not unreasonable, to sort on the first reboot and I'm happy, for about 30 seconds.

Ubuntu recognises my external USB drive that has all my music on it, Trying to play an MP3 gives me the 'cannot do this message, offer to search?' Search finds nothing. I eventually identify the modules needed, download and install them and then try to access my music.

Goes from bad to worse. Run a 'music player', import a directory and it will only play one track. I tried several, made no difference.

Now the people who designed the interfaces to these things, and I use the term(s) loosely, are wasting my time. If I put a CD in my CD player and press play, it works. Why the difference?

When it comes to technical things I have great patience. Things like this, unless I've sussed in 10 seconds, forget it. I suppose that's why Apple have just posted increased sales and profits. Next year we'll see the Windows 7 effect on MS profits.

Finally, I don't want to spend my time working out how to use something that is second nature to you or a sound engineer. I just want music.

Overall : FAILED

MidnightCowboy 06. Nov 2009 10:22 PM

The rest of it was OK then? :D

Jojo Yee 07. Nov 2009 02:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rikmayell (Post 15802)
Ubuntu 9.10 is a major change to earlier 9.x versions. Much touted as a Windows 7 killer, I has chance this afternoon to try it out. I may not be the best judge as I expect things like this to 'just work.'

Ubuntu recognises my external USB drive that has all my music on it, Trying to play an MP3 gives me the 'cannot do this message, offer to search?' Search finds nothing. I eventually identify the modules needed, download and install them and then try to access my music.

Goes from bad to worse. Run a 'music player', import a directory and it will only play one track. I tried several, made no difference.

I agree with Rik that I expect things to just work. If the OS never asks me to go DOS or Terminal to key in some commands, I will give it a thumbs-up.

My experience in playing mp3 on Rhythmbox Music Player, a default player pre-installed with Ubuntu 9.10, is still good.

When I click an mp3 file, it prompts me to download 3 extra files, I click OK and it downloads for me without me searching, and it plays well after downloading. Unfortunately, Ubuntu doesn't want to include mp3 codec by default. It has been touted in this article the first thing to do among 10 Things To Do After You Install Ubuntu.

I tried my mp3 collection in my external harddisk via an USB port. Imported the folder into the music player, and it still plays fine for me. It auto plays the second mp3 after finishing the first one with no issue.

Close the music player, unplug and replug the harddisk, re-open the player, hey, the imported list of mp3 is still there. I don't need to import again. (not yet tried it if it works the same when I re-start the OS).

So far, one thing I'm most unhappy with is that the windows manager comes with Ubuntu always open up the window at the top left of the desktop area. It can't memorize the position of the last open winows. Worse still, I managed to set the windows to open at the center when using Ubuntu 9.04, and I couldn't get it to work the same using Ubuntu 9.10. Certain tips I got from 'Mr. Google' do not seem to work either.

bk_7312 07. Nov 2009 02:47 AM

Funny how I was reading this review about Ubuntu 9.10 just a few minutes ago. It's a very comprehensive review that covers a lot of things, though the reviewer, an experienced Linux user, had encountered quite a few problems, it just goes to show that Linux isn't going to kill Windows anytime soon. But remember that Ubuntu isn't the only Linux distro available, and also the fact/myth (please underline the correct answer) that Linux has a habit of working well on some PCs while having problems on others.:D

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/ubuntu-9-10.html

Also, the reviewer will be reviewing Kubuntu, Xubuntu, OpenSUSE and Fedora soon so stay tune.

Jojo Yee 07. Nov 2009 03:46 AM

Thanks bk_7312 for pointing to this article Ubuntu 9.10 - One step forward, two steps back, well written and informative.

While I'm reading it...

On the 'Confusing stuff' about IBus, it says:

Quote:

Some of the menu entries are not that clear. For example, there's the IBus entry. I have no idea what it does...
IBus refers to "Intelligent Input Bus". According to Wiki, it is "an input method (IM) framework for multilingual input in Unix-like operating systems [like Ubuntu Linux]. It's called "Bus" because it has a bus-like architecture."

I use IBus on Ubuntu 9.10 smoothly without an issue. I need IBus to input Eastern language characters on applications running in Ubuntu 9.10, and it works quite similarly to the way the language bar and input methods used in Windows.

On this point, I give Ubuntu 9.10 a thumbs-up, but it should consider to use 'input method' or other general terms rather than the technical term 'IBus'.

Jojo Yee 07. Nov 2009 04:14 AM

Grub2
 
On Grub 2, it says:

Quote:

If you watch your machine boot, you will see that the GRUB is titled GRUB 1.97Beta4, which hardly inspires confidence...I have not yet tested chainloading or upgrading, so I can't report much on this yet, but I will update you as soon as I complete testing.
I also don't understand why Ubuntu 9.10 has to push for Grub2 while its 9.04 is using legacy Grub.

Ubuntu 9.04 allows you to edit Grub file (menu.lst) directly, 9.10 doesn't allow you to edit Grub2 file (grub.cfg) directly.

I've tested chainloading from Win7 to Ubuntu without an issue. See my related post.

07. Nov 2009 11:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MidnightCowboy (Post 15825)
The rest of it was OK then? :D

No it wasn't

This is just a simple example of something that should work out of the box. Ok, they claim they cannot install the MP3 software due to legal issues. Fine I can understand that. But why offer a search option that just doesn't work??

We still have the boring graphics and resolutions included with Ubuntu, unless we choose to install a driver owned by the hardware supplier. No bit difference from Windows 7 there then. :)

Boot and shutdown times are now so bad I start the process and go and do something else. This puts 9.10 on a par with Vista. Windows 7 is streets ahead due to significant efforts to reduce resource contention in the kernel.

This all sounds like I hate Ubuntu. I don't. My downstairs laptop runs it all the time, just a pain to have to sort audio out again. On my main machine I switch between the 64 bit versions of Ubuntu 9,10 and Windows 7, depending on the tools that I happen to need.

Perhaps the next major release of Ubuntu will once and for all nail these multimedia issues. Who knows?

Rik

MidnightCowboy 07. Nov 2009 12:41 PM

Well, having had to wait a week for my mobile tech to come back I am (supposedly) getting a clean install of 9.10 this morning together with whatever script has had to be re-written to enable my Sony/Claro modem to connect.

If all goes well it will be bye-bye and hasta-la-VISTA and I'll be able to look at this version of Ubuntu for myself :)

Jojo Yee 09. Nov 2009 04:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jojoyee (Post 15840)
So far, one thing I'm most unhappy with is that the windows manager comes with Ubuntu always open up the window at the top left of the desktop area. It can't memorize the position of the last open windows. Worse still, I managed to set the windows to open at the center when using Ubuntu 9.04, and I couldn't get it to work the same using Ubuntu 9.10. Certain tips I got from 'Mr. Google' do not seem to work either.

I managed to get it to work now with this (after installing CCSM): :)

System > Preferences > CompizConfig-Settings-Manager > Window Management > Place Windows > Placement Mode > Centered.

At least now any new window will open up in center (as it does in 9.04), and not in a top-left corner. The placement mode 'smart' doesn't look smart at all to me. :rolleyes:

Ritho 10. Nov 2009 03:42 PM

Ubuntu early adopters will always smart for it.
 
One thing many experienced Ubuntu users will do is wait a month or so after a new release before upgrading. I have been using Ubuntu for a quite some time now and find that most of the initial problems are ironed out in the first 4 or 5 weeks. If you use a community edition such as Linux Mint, you will usually find it has less bugs because it is released after most of the original bugs are fixed. It is interesting to note that statistically Karmic has been just about as troublesome for early adopters, as Jaunty, which was just a little better than Intrepid.

Anyway since Ubuntu releases a new edition every 6 months it does not really give the OS enough beta and RC testing time. It really does Canonical a lot of harm and also Linux in general because users who may looking to move to a new OS from Windows will usually download the newest editions (instead of the LTS edition) and they will give up on it and may not try again.

While I agree that 9.10 is definitely not a Windows 7 killer, Ubuntu has come a long way in the last seven years for a free OS and a lot of hopes are hanging on 10.4 which will be the next LTS.

MidnightCowboy 10. Nov 2009 06:12 PM

Hi Ritho

I've outlined a few of my own issues in the other thread since updating from 9.04 but the worst one for me won't affect many because it's related to my broadband modem. There are similar queries appearing alread,y but the post I made on the Ubuntu forum myself remains unanswered.

This apart though, from your experience (or anyone's) are the other issues I have line Gnometris not working properly, dis-functional Firefox extensions, VLC crashes etc likely to be fixed by system updates or will I still be looking to do a clean install after the bugs have been ironed out in a few weeks time? I say this because Jojo is not seeing these problems so I'm guessing mine must be in some way system specific.

Jojo Yee 11. Nov 2009 08:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MidnightCowboy (Post 16121)
Hi Ritho

I've outlined a few of my own issues in the other thread since updating from 9.04 but the worst one for me won't affect many because it's related to my broadband modem... I say this because Jojo is not seeing these problems so I'm guessing mine must be in some way system specific.

I suppose if the driver fits into 9.04, it should fix into 9.10 as well, just suppose.

On another review, this guy says Ubuntu 9.10 -- almost perfect, but some better games, video editing and a better music player should have been included or chosen.

Is Ubuntu 9.10 perfect? "No. But so, so close."

bk_7312 11. Nov 2009 02:56 PM

A friend of mine recently downloaded Ubuntu 9.10 .ISO file, I asked for a copy and I have just booted into Ubuntu 9.10 a while ago in VirtualBox under MEPIS Linux. My PC has 512MB of RAM and 1.2GB swap. I didn't install Ubuntu in VirtualBox (or even want to), I just wanted to try Ubuntu as a LiveCD but didn't feel like wasting time (or CD) burning another CD.

I gave Ubuntu 226MB of RAM and loaded the .ISO file and started trying it. I was amazed that it booted to a fully usable desktop in less that 2 minutes:eek:! Note that I was booting it in VirtualBox with 226MB RAM. Unfortunately, after it booted to the desktop, everything slowed down, even the cursor movements weren't smooth.

MEPIS Linux took about 3 minutes or more to boot from the LiveCD, not in VirtualBox but from the CD, and because it was booted from the CD, it has access to all 512MB of RAM. To make the test fair, I booted into MEPIS Linux in VirtualBox with 226MB of RAM but the boot time was still almost the same.

This is truly shocking... I hope MEPIS 8.5 will drastically reduce its boot time like Ubuntu, in both the LiveCD experience and after installing.

Jojo Yee 11. Nov 2009 04:14 PM

Windows 7 vs. Ubuntu 9.10 Boot Time shown side by side on YouTube:

Booting up Ubuntu 9.10 (33 seconds), Win7 (44 seconds)
Loading firefox in Ubuntu 9.10 (2 seconds), Win7 (12 seconds)

Shutting down Ubuntu is much faster than Win7.

(My experience in time taken to shut down Ubuntu is that: it completes shutdown before you have a chance to walk away. MC's experience: I first shut down 9.10 I actually thought the power had gone off :D)

... and Ubuntu aims for 10 second boot time in the next release 10.04 (year 2010, April)

I agree Ubuntu is more responsive in these areas, but features wise... ehmmm, Ubuntu needs to pick up.

bk_7312 12. Nov 2009 04:39 AM

Ubuntu's boot time convinced me to install it in VirtualBox, installation was fairly simple, I skipped disk partitioning and finished the installation within 30 minutes. Afterwards, I booted into Ubuntu, the boot time was approximately 45 seconds, the shut down time was an incredibly 2 to 3 seconds:eek:!

I didn't encounter any problem at all, maybe it was because I didn't bother trying anything (from playing mp3 files to trying out apps and etc). Will try them soon when I have the time. I was just checking out the pre-installed list of softwares and browsing through the menus when I realized that there was no control panel:confused:. Maybe I missed it or something but it's weird not being able to find the control panel.

Well, that's pretty much everything, not much to say except that I might switch to Ubuntu if it performs well in VirtualBox. So far, everything seems quite promising. Right now, I just wish that I could get more disk space and RAM for my laptop so that it could populate more OS for me to try:D.

MidnightCowboy 12. Nov 2009 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bk_7312 (Post 1625)

I didn't encounter any problem at all, maybe it was because I didn't bother trying anything (from playing mp3 files to trying out apps and etc). Will try them soon when I have the time. I was just checking out the pre-installed list of softwares and browsing through the menus when I realized that there was no control panel:confused:. Maybe I missed it or something but it's weird not being able to find the control panel.

I'm convinced now that 95% of the problems I've encountered are because I elected to upgrade my existing installation rather than make a clean install of 9.10.

Ubuntu is different to Windows in a lot of areas :) Desktop settings are the same as my Vista in that you can right click on the screen to gain access to this but other stuff you need to access from System-Preferences-Administration or Maintenance.

The various links in this 'how to' explain it all

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SystemAdministration

Jojo Yee 12. Nov 2009 02:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bk_7312 (Post 16258)
I was just checking out the pre-installed list of softwares and browsing through the menus when I realized that there was no control panel:confused:. Maybe I missed it or something but it's weird not being able to find the control panel.

Ubuntu 9.10 separates the control items into "Preference" and "Administration" by default, accessible from:

System > Preferences
System > Administration

Some users prefer to have a Control Center, which can be enabled following the steps:

1. Right-click System (or Main Menu)
2. Select "Edit Menus"
3. Select System in the Menus column
4. Tick "Control Center" and click "Close".

Then you can access the Control Center from:

System > Control Center

Jojo Yee 12. Nov 2009 02:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MidnightCowboy (Post 16270)
I'm convinced now that 95% of the problems I've encountered are because I elected to upgrade my existing installation rather than make a clean install of 9.10.

On upgrading to Ubuntu 9.10, Ubuntu says "be sure that you have all updates applied to Ubuntu 9.04 before you upgrade" and also recommends to read the release notes which document caveats and workarounds for known issues.

Personally I'd prefer to do a fresh installation rather than upgrading with all these extra steps which would end up taking even more time and trouble for me. :rolleyes:

MidnightCowboy 13. Nov 2009 12:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jojoyee (Post 16279)
On upgrading to Ubuntu 9.10, Ubuntu says "be sure that you have all updates applied to Ubuntu 9.04 before you upgrade" and also recommends to read the release notes which document caveats and workarounds for known issues.

Personally I'd prefer to do a fresh installation rather than upgrading with all these extra steps which would end up taking even more time and trouble for me. :rolleyes:

I was real careful about applying all the updates first but somewhere along the line other issues must have come into play. I guess their upgrade setup could never foresee every possible customized config that the new version would have to install around so I've ended up with what I've got! :D

Never fear, all is not lost. I know Vista hates me but we'll get along until I can get things sorted :)

wdhpr 13. Nov 2009 03:20 AM

I have to admit to being slightly amused by the problems encountered by those trying to upgrade to Ubuntu 9.10. I have to confess to not being a fan of Ubuntu for I myself have tried to become a member of the Ubuntu fan club. To no avail and I am back chugging along with my Simply Mepis. There maybe something said for thoroughly ironing out the bugs before unleashing an upgrade to the ravenous Ubuntu fans. I thought this write up tries to explain the issue:
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/11...a_frustration/

The silver lining in all these storm clouds maybe the strong learning curve required to fix all the problems :D

Cheers
Wdhpr

MidnightCowboy 13. Nov 2009 10:04 AM

Mimics by own experiences exactly! :)

Ritho 15. Nov 2009 11:46 AM

MidnightCowboy,

I always clean install. I have never attempted an upgrade install and so I don't no if system updates will fix your problems with like VLC crashing or Firefox extensions malfunctioning. I usually apply system updates, but have never experienced them helping me with many problems I may have encountered previously. Yet I have been lucky, I guess, because I have had very few problems and most of them minor. I have had some bad experiences with other distros, one of the more common has been streaming media. As for my physical system I usually buy stuff that has been out for a while ( = Cheeper) and is already well supported by the Linux community. I did buy a netbook, Acer Aspire One, and while the wireless works great, I have never been able to get Ethernet to work with Ubuntu, which is oddly backwards from what most users experience.

Anyway I have found Ubuntu 9.04 "minty flavor" (Linux Mint 7) very stable on my machine and am sticking with it for now until I see the bug reports settling down a bit.

-Ritho

MidnightCowboy 15. Nov 2009 07:01 PM

Thanks for sharing your own experiences. On the plus side, my tech guy here is also an Ubuntu fanatic so I can be sure that once the bugs get ironed out I will end up with a usable install again. This situation is also forcing me to get more familiar with Vista (LOL) which in reality is likely to be of more use in general here on the site than Linux in as far as visitor queries and comments are concerned.

bk_7312 16. Nov 2009 04:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jojoyee (Post 16277)
Ubuntu 9.10 separates the control items into "Preference" and "Administration" by default, accessible from:

System > Preferences
System > Administration

Some users prefer to have a Control Center, which can be enabled following the steps:

1. Right-click System (or Main Menu)
2. Select "Edit Menus"
3. Select System in the Menus column
4. Tick "Control Center" and click "Close".

Then you can access the Control Center from:

System > Control Center

Thanks Jojoyee!

I always preferred an all-in-one control panel, don't really like things to be scattered.

As for Ubuntu in VirtualBox, I had quite a pleasant experience, just that everything was not as out-of-the-box as I had expected, MEPIS feels more out-of-the-box to me, but that doesn't matter, Linux has been my main desktop for more that half a year now so I knew my way around, and by 'I knew my way around', I actually mean something along the lines of 'I click everything I think was relevant to what I want to do and google the rest!' and 'The command line is my last resort! MUAHAHAHAHA!'. :D Just the usuals.:)

The only problem I've encountered was that Ubuntu failed to detect my monitor!? This may just be a small problem with VirtualBox but it's weird that the monitor was not detected even though everything is displayed properly (I can see the desktop). Well, that's pretty much sums up everything.

P.S - I almost forgot, here comes Kubuntu: http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/kubuntu-9-10.html

Ritho 03. Dec 2009 03:33 PM

I made the move from 9.04 to 9.10
 
As I mentioned in previous posts I waited a while until many of the initial bugs were fixed before taking the plunge and trying out Karmic.

I fresh installed on another hard drive, and setup was smooth and problem free. I thought it was odd how much time the install process spent downloading language packs, but other than that I have no complaints with the install process.

Everything worked "out of the box" and overall I am pleased with the new Ubuntu. However, like many others, I don't like the new GDM, and its lack of configurablity/customization. Many have been downgrading back to 2.20 to get back the ability to use themes and easily change the boot screens.

If you are interested here is a good guide to doing the downgrade. http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?p=8350408#post8350408


You could also try installing an alternative such as KDM or SLIM

My verdict is if you are looking for a great free OS that can compete with Windows 7 Ubuntu 9.10 is a good choice. If you are a themer (i.e. you like to customize everything about the gui) and you don't like putting in a lot of terminal time tweeking, then consider sticking with 9.04 I have a feeling that someone will create a GUI to handle many of the tweeks soon.

Jojo Yee 03. Dec 2009 04:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ritho (Post 17540)
I fresh installed on another hard drive, and setup was smooth and problem free. I thought it was odd how much time the install process spent downloading language packs, but other than that I have no complaints with the install process.

There's a skip button at the right to skip downloading the packs.

Ritho 04. Dec 2009 01:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jojoyee (Post 17543)
There's a skip button at the right to skip downloading the packs.

Yes I saw that I could skip them, but I need/use two different languages, and it seemed simpler to let them be installed then rather than later. I just thought it was weird they seemed like such large downloads. I have a 12Mbps connection and even downloading the Ubuntu image only took a few minutes. It seemed like the packs took almost as long if not longer to download. It may be that the connection to the server was slow or was under heavy use. Maybe I missed it but I did not see an indicator anywhere on download size or speed. No big deal though unless you are still on dial-up or something:D

MidnightCowboy 05. Dec 2009 12:25 AM

Well, one month into the 9.10 distro cycle and I'm still far from convinced by the current crop of forum bugs and other errors being reported. I did download a fresh image yesterday because my tech-on-a-bike arrives again tomorrow morning to rescue my failed upgrade. He's aggressively suggesting Fedora 12 this time which I have been booting several times a day from the USB live image I downloaded (KDE variant) to play with and I do like it. Apparently the full install issues plaguing V11 have not re-emerged with this release and despite being "cutting edge" it appears to be at least as stable as the current state of 9.10. I'll talk with him face to face in the morning first before making a final decision but I might go for this anyway and maybe re-visit Ubuntu another couple of months or so down the road :)

Jojo Yee 05. Dec 2009 02:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ritho (Post 17572)
Yes I saw that I could skip them, but I need/use two different languages, and it seemed simpler to let them be installed then rather than later. I just thought it was weird they seemed like such large downloads. I have a 12Mbps connection and even downloading the Ubuntu image only took a few minutes. It seemed like the packs took almost as long if not longer to download...

Good observation and high bandwidth.

There's DVD Downloads which says the main benefit of the DVD downloads is to get access to all of the available language packs. So I suppose the language pack is included and will make the installation faster. But I have not tried it. :cool:

novice 05. Dec 2009 06:53 PM

If you use Ubuntu can you use all of your current software that is designed for Widows?

wdhpr 05. Dec 2009 10:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by novice (Post 17665)
If you use Ubuntu can you use all of your current software that is designed for Widows?

The short answer is NO! You can not Run widows software on a linux OS

But their are caveats.

Linux has many applications that can do the same job as their Windows counterparts. For example Open Office can process most Windows word processing files. Linux has multimedia software that can play any video or music formats that you can throw at it.

There is a Linux program that allows you run actual windows software on a Linux platform. It is called Wine This software is in constant development however its ability to run Windows software, which includes games, is at best hit and miss.

You questions leads me to believe you are curious about linux but with a limited understanding of Linux. This is fine. Anyone with a computer keeps hearing about this Linux thing. My advice is to Google the word linux and start familiarizing yourself about Linux. For a snapshot of the linux platforms check out this site: http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major
If you are a average computer user, move slowly with linux.

There are Linux live CD's ISO's that be downloaded and then you can burn the ISO image to a CD/DVD disk. You can then boot these Live CD's and have a actual Linux OS to explore, all the time not changing anything to your Windows OS. Most people can move to linux as a dual boot Platform after some time and self education. I found it a very rewarding experience However I still use Windows due to some technical difficulties with Linux.
Hope this helps :)

Cheers
Wdhpr

Jojo Yee 06. Dec 2009 02:00 AM

When running on Linux, the best is to run the Linux applications natively. Running Windows applications through Wine sometimes does not get the results you might have expected. I tried Notepad++ through Wine, a lot of features were missed from the program. At the end, I chose to use Gedit, Bluefish or Screem to edit html files.

See also:
Best Free Software for Linux (more good software will be added to the list when we move forward)
Tips and Tricks for Ubuntu after Installation

Ritho 07. Dec 2009 07:03 PM

Truth be told, many, if not a majority, of Linux users dual boot, or run
Windows in a virtual machine. I use the latter choice, and run both XP and 7 in a virtual machine.

I have found that most simple windows programs will work well in wine for Linux. The simpler the program the better. Usually the more complex a program is the harder it is to get to run in wine.

You can opt to do it the other way around too, and run a Linux virtual machine on windows. Here are three different ways to use Linux directly in Windows.

1. http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/virtualbox
2. http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=4171
3. http://www.andlinux.org/

dre 15. Dec 2009 06:42 PM

Has anyone experienced trouble of getting file sharing to work from Ubuntu 9.10 with Windows client/server? After updating samba even. Worked flawlessly with 9.04 and 8.04 as i can remember.

debtboy 15. Dec 2009 07:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dre (Post 18329)
Has anyone experienced trouble of getting file sharing to work from Ubuntu 9.10 with Windows client/server? After updating samba even. Worked flawlessly with 9.04 and 8.04 as i can remember.

Hi dre,
I'm currently running a samba server on my Mangaka-Chu (Debial/Ubuntu based distro) w/ no problems,
but I previously ran into a problem on Fedora w/ SELinux enabled, additional settings were needed,
but I disabled SELinux instead to get it to work.
Check if you have SELinux (security enhanced linux) enabled.

Other then that, it might be a firewall or your smb.conf file,
but again I'm not running Ubuntu 9.10

dre 15. Dec 2009 07:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by debtboy (Post 18334)
Hi dre,
I'm currently running a samba server on my Mangaka-Chu (Debial/Ubuntu based distro) w/ no problems,
but I previously ran into a problem on Fedora w/ SELinux enabled, additional settings were needed,
but I disabled SELinux instead to get it to work.
Check if you have SELinux (security enhanced linux) enabled.

Other then that, it might be a firewall or your smb.conf file,
but again I'm not running Ubuntu 9.10

Hi

I'm currently running Windows 2003 server here at home. Setting up share from Ubuntu 9.10 and on the server. Previously Ubuntu with 8.04 and 9.04. Did not have any problems. Today i could not even share a folder, but updating samba sorted that out. In my place>network i can see my domain but it tells me unable to mount location>failed to retrieve share list from server. I have looked a bit on Ubuntu forums but no luck yet. Firewall is disabled. What to modify then in smb.conf? I have changed the workgroup to my server domain name. Thats all.

debtboy 15. Dec 2009 10:44 PM

Please post all of your smb.conf
and are you using a domain (ex.. \domain\user)

One more thing...
Do your connections work when using your local machine ip address
and not the computer name?


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