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Old 02. May 2010, 07:27 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Wow.. Do you regularly use all of them? Personally I have a lot of virtual machines, but they're mainly for irregular testing and compatibility.

Edit:
Also, what's so different about Kubuntu (other than KDE) that got you to install it on your computer?
My most frequently used OSes: Win7 and Ubuntu. The rest are for research purposes such as testing programs for compatibility issues, etc. Kubuntu was installed much earlier on and I just run it when needed.
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Old 02. May 2010, 07:51 AM   #12 (permalink)
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I see. Personally I find virtual machines much more convenient, especially with 4 gb of RAM and VmWare Player.
Chose Vmware because it's much faster than Virtual PC, can import XP mode's license, and is simpler than VirtualBox. Only wish that it supports tabs and convenient backups (I have to manually copy). Its compatibility is amazing! (especially since I use Windows 7 64-bit)
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Old 02. May 2010, 07:48 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Personally I find virtual machines much more convenient
I know that this is straying off-topic (Naughty me) but I am going to concur with this statement. There was a point in time when I welcomed the challenge of configuring multi-boot MBR's. With very few exceptions (some software's do not like Virtual environments), I am all Virtual now and love the fact that I can even run several OS's simultaneously. Is this not an option for you?

If it is a matter of the time you have invested into setup and configuration of you existing OS's, VMWare's free converter will make short work of converting your physical machines to virtual images.

Of course, the technical challenge of a complex configuration can be as intoxicating as a good wine!
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Old 02. May 2010, 08:21 PM   #14 (permalink)
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For me I use both. I dual boot and use virtual machines. I have a few things that I can not get to run well in Vmware. One in particular I use all the time is Paintshop Pro. It runs very sluggishly. I have tried VirtualBox as well with the same results. I have a Phenom 4 processor and 4gig of ram and have tried as much as 2gig loaned to the VM but there is still a hang up somewhere and I have not been able to work it out.
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Old 03. May 2010, 03:07 AM   #15 (permalink)
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My personal preference is still multi boot than resorting to VM, which requires more RAM and experiences some sorts of sluggishness as mentioned by Ritho. After all, with reboot time now getting shorter, I find rebooting a better choice.
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Old 26. Jun 2010, 05:52 AM   #16 (permalink)
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I just tried running Ubuntu 10.04 as the guest OS via VirtualBox 3.2.6 on the host OS Win7.

VirtualBox initially gave me a smaller window to work with. I later installed Guest Additions, cd to /media/VBOXADDITIONS_3.2.6_63112 and sudo sh ./VBoxLinuxAdditions-x86.run, then restarted Ubuntu (as guest OS) in full screen with the hotkey right-Ctrl-F.

The only immediate benefit I see is that I can run Ubuntu side-by-side without leaving Win7, but overall, the guest OS is running much slower and less responsive than running it alone.

Working on a PC with a dual-core processor and 2G RAM, I think it's still a better choice for me to just hibernate Win7, and reboot into Ubuntu now that this process is pretty fast, instead of letting the host and guest sharing out the hardware resources at the same time.
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Old 08. Oct 2010, 12:07 PM   #17 (permalink)
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On a different subject, I will try to dual or triple boot my system and wondered what would be the best shared partition between Windows and Ubuntu. I have read a good few tutorials but they all seem to be quite dated. Is it still the best option to go for FAT32 FS for a shared partition?
And I was planning on sharing thunderbird and firefox settings between the two OS's.

Also a VMWare question ( I have not researched this myself yet so please if the answer is more than a straight forward yes or no do not spend any time answering this)
I have not used VM's before and my understanding is that lets say with VMWare I could create an image of my current Windows 7 system, save it, and I could launch as many instances of VM's of that image as a number of copies I have of that image.

Thanks for your time
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Old 14. Oct 2010, 12:41 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Quote:
On a different subject, I will try to dual or triple boot my system and wondered what would be the best shared partition between Windows and Ubuntu. I have read a good few tutorials but they all seem to be quite dated. Is it still the best option to go for FAT32 FS for a shared partition?
And I was planning on sharing thunderbird and firefox settings between the two OS's.
I choose the advanced setup at install. I already had a root and swap partion prior to my Ubuntu install. I picked the ext4 file sysem (supposedly a improved Ext3 file system) I also ticked the format box. I selected / to install my root directory. I installed grub onto my main hardrive were my Winxp is. (not onto winxp itself) I then I went forward with the install.

If your not familier with the process I would go with the side by side install.

As far as VMWare I just don't have the horse power. I'm like Jojyee in this regards its just to slow.

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Old 14. Oct 2010, 06:37 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Yep I have tried VM as well and its just too slow, I am on the dual boot with 7 and Ubuntu and it works perfect... at last
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Old 14. Oct 2010, 06:49 AM   #20 (permalink)
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One thing that often helps speed up vm's considerably is to relocate the virtual hard drive to a separate physical disk (not just a separate partition) than your OS. Because your OS and the Virtual machine are both accessing data on the same disk at the same time the I/O opperations slow both machines.

Edit:Also defragment the drive where the image is stored, or use a defragmenter that supports defragging single files and just defrag the HD image.
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Last edited by Ritho; 14. Oct 2010 at 06:55 AM.
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