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Old 04. Sep 2015, 02:25 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Installing Linux on UEFI Computer

For some time now I have been thinking of installing Linux Mint in dual boot with Windows 10. Recently, I have been thinking more seriously about it and I think I am just about ready to do it. I have been searching around for instructions on how to do this properly. I have read the part of the Official User Guide from Linux Mint that has to do with installing it. I also found some guides on the internet but I am still uncertain about some things.

a. UEFI with Secure Boot
Every guide I have read, including this one, tells me to disable Secure Boot. As we know, Secure Boot is there to protect against boot kits. I know I have to turn it off to install Linux but do I have to leave it off? Does Linux provide any protection against boot kits?

b. Fast Startup in Windows 10
I have come across conflicting instructions about turning off Fast Startup when installing Linux. To be clear, I am not talking about a feature with a similar name in some firmware, I am talking about the Fast Startup feature in Windows 8, 8.1 and 10. Now, back to the question. One tutorial says turning off Fast Startup is optional whereas another says it ”...is almost certain to cause filesystem corruption if left enabled”. Who should I believe?

c. Home Partition
All tutorials which I have read say I should create 3 partitions, viz. root, swap and home. From what I read, the home partition is where my personal files are stored, however, I already have an NTFS data partition with folders named My Documents, My Music, etc. Can I leave out the home partition when installing Linux and adapt this tutorial which I have found? It looks like if I execute all the commands, with the exception of the two mkdir commands, it should work. Am I right?

If someone is able to answer these questions I’ll be on my way.

Thanks.
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Old 04. Sep 2015, 08:15 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Joe A.TT View Post
b. Fast Startup in Windows 10
I have come across conflicting instructions about turning off Fast Startup when installing Linux. To be clear, I am not talking about a feature with a similar name in some firmware, I am talking about the Fast Startup feature in Windows 8, 8.1 and 10. Now, back to the question. One tutorial says turning off Fast Startup is optional whereas another says it ”...is almost certain to cause filesystem corruption if left enabled”. Who should I believe?
In the tutorial where it's mentioned that it's optional, it says it is better to disable it.

Also, I read this page which was linked from the second tutorial:

http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials...ndows-8-a.html

and in the warning block, it says that if you are booting Windows 8 (and so 10 too), with Windows 7 and below, then it's better to disable fast boot to avoid startup issues.

Not sure, but I think the logical guess is that the fast boot procedure when enabled, writes some kind of information on each of the disk it finds attached to the computer, whether it's of Windows or not.. and so, it can cause problems.

So, all in all, better to disable fast boot.
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Old 04. Sep 2015, 08:25 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Default Fast Startup in Windows will have this issue in Linux

See this post about the issue of fast startup in Windows with regard to Linux.

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However, Linux won't be able to mount my Windows NTFS partitions if Windows hibernates during shutdown. With hibernation and fast startup set on, I will have to either press "shift+shutdown" or "restart" to shutdown Windows without hibernation, then boot into Linux system to be able to access Windows NTFS partitions.
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Old 04. Sep 2015, 10:37 AM   #4 (permalink)
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c. Home Partition
All tutorials which I have read say I should create 3 partitions, viz. root, swap and home. From what I read, the home partition is where my personal files are stored, however, I already have an NTFS data partition with folders named My Documents, My Music, etc. Can I leave out the home partition when installing Linux and adapt this tutorial which I have found? It looks like if I execute all the commands, with the exception of the two mkdir commands, it should work. Am I right?
Separate partitions for home and root are not mandatory unless for some specific reasons. Without those partitions, a Linux installation will still work.

In my case, I seldom create a separate partition for root and another for home, except the swap partition to ease the process of installation. I save all personal data in a separate NTFS partition that can be accessed from both Linux and Windows systems.
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Old 04. Sep 2015, 10:59 AM   #5 (permalink)
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a. UEFI with Secure Boot
Every guide I have read, including this one, tells me to disable Secure Boot. As we know, Secure Boot is there to protect against boot kits. I know I have to turn it off to install Linux but do I have to leave it off? Does Linux provide any protection against boot kits?
Disabling SecureBoot seems to be a popular choice for a dual boot with Linux at this moment though there are other distros that support SecureBoot like Ubuntu 12.04.2 and 12.10 as mentioned in this article http://www.howtogeek.com/175641/how-...h-secure-boot/. However, Linux Mint 17.2 has said that SecureBoot is not supported.

In general, Linux system is regarded more secure than Windows. If you're running a PC with SecureBoot disabled, consider some security measures against pre-boot attacks as recommended at the end of this article http://www.cert-ist.com/public/en/SO...?code=bootkits.

Last edited by Jojo Yee; 04. Sep 2015 at 11:05 AM.
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Old 04. Sep 2015, 11:33 AM   #6 (permalink)
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a./ secure boot has to be turned OFF, whereas UEFI can be left ON with later Ubuntu / Mint versions.
as it prevents some installers from working properly. & so it remains turned OFF.

b./ Fast Start / Hibernate needs to be OFF as the installer often can't see any existing partitions,
and then wants to use the whole HDD - ie: wipe it.

c./ a separate /home partition is sometimes used, as it enables easier re-installation, at a later date.
and upgrades are also made easier with a separate /home partition.

Last edited by Pierre2; 04. Sep 2015 at 11:41 AM.
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Old 04. Sep 2015, 04:52 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Thank you all for the prompt and helpful replies.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jojo Yee View Post
However, Linux won't be able to mount my Windows NTFS partitions if Windows hibernates during shutdown. With hibernation and fast startup set on, I will have to either press "shift+shutdown" or "restart" to shutdown Windows without hibernation, then boot into Linux system to be able to access Windows NTFS partitions.
I see. That means I'll have to put up with Windows taking 3 times longer to boot.

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Originally Posted by Jojo Yee View Post
Separate partitions for home and root are not mandatory unless for some specific reasons. Without those partitions, a Linux installation will still work.

In my case, I seldom create a separate partition for root and another for home, except the swap partition to ease the process of installation. I save all personal data in a separate NTFS partition that can be accessed from both Linux and Windows systems.
Lemme get this straight. Are you saying you usually only create 2 partitions, i.e. root and swap?

Also, do I have to execute the commands in this tutorial (except mkdir or course) to point Linux to my data partition so it will know this is where I want to save my personal files?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jojo Yee View Post
...there are other distros that support SecureBoot like Ubuntu 12.04.2 and 12.10 as mentioned in this article http://www.howtogeek.com/175641/how-...h-secure-boot/. However, Linux Mint 17.2 has said that SecureBoot is not supported.
Yes, I am aware that some distros like Ubuntu support Secure Boot but I think I want to stick with Mint.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jojo Yee View Post
In general, Linux system is regarded more secure than Windows. If you're running a PC with SecureBoot disabled, consider some security measures against pre-boot attacks as recommended at the end of this article http://www.cert-ist.com/public/en/SO...?code=bootkits.
Yes, I know Linux is more secure than Windows but I don't know how it does against boot kits.

Also, thanks for the article on Kon-boot, it was a very interesting read. I think the measures recommended in the article are a bit extreme, for me at least, so I won't be implementing them for now. I believe security measures should be in direct relation to a person's environment and potential exposure. In my case I should be quite safe.

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c./ a separate /home partition is sometimes used, as it enables easier re-installation, at a later date.
and upgrades are also made easier with a separate /home partition.
Interesting. I have never come across anything that says the home partition makes reinstalling or upgrading easier. Could you post a link or two so I can read up on it?

BTW, what ever happened with your friend's problem which you mentioned in this thread? Was the problem solved? How? Could you tell us (on that thread of course)?
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Old 05. Sep 2015, 02:03 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Okay. I installed Mint. It was uneventful. I didn't create the Home partition. I should be able to browse to my data partition and access my files just like in Windows.
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Old 05. Sep 2015, 03:34 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Joe A.TT View Post
Okay. I installed Mint. It was uneventful. I didn't create the Home partition. I should be able to browse to my data partition and access my files just like in Windows.
Glad that you've got it sorted. What you need is just a new partition and set the mount point "/" (called "root") for the system during install.

When you boot into your Linux Mint system, your data partition may not be auto mounted. But you can set it to auto mount when the system starts. See this tip: http://www.techsupportalert.com/cont...System-Startup

Last edited by Jojo Yee; 05. Sep 2015 at 03:45 AM.
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Old 05. Sep 2015, 01:08 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Thank you Jojo. I did bookmark your article but haven't got around to reading it yet. I'm sure I'll find a lot of helpful tips, including the one you brought to my attention.
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