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-   -   I have gone Linux (https://www.techsupportalert.com/freeware-forum/linux/1443-i-have-gone-linux.html)

tony 20. Jul 2009 08:35 AM

I have gone Linux
 
Well as some of you know I have one hell of a problem finding a Linux OS that would work on my 64bit comp. I thought I had tried everything, but I hadn't. I bought the comp without an OS and I used my WinXP32 OS on it, which actually was not very stable and it was really no behaving well at all. So in desperation I have installed OpenSuse 64bit, which I had tried as a dual boot, but in desperation have installed it now as my only operating system. Its been working for a few days now and has been working very well. Only I really miss easy to use software. Linux software is always more complicated and the GUI can be none existent. For instance, creating DVD's out of Youtube films/info for my photographic club is going to be complex and I have looked at converting those downloads as well. I need a brain to do work it:confused: In Windows I clicked my mouse and hey presto. Ah well, we will see how things keep on going.

I think, and this is only my theory as I am not a computer boffin, that the XP really should not be on the 64bit and possibly there were conflicts. I just don't know, all I know is, is that Suse is now working and I have an operating system, but alas I shan't be able to work on my editorials without Windows. :( :eek:

I have two more things up my sleeve if Suse does not perform and is not going to be stable. But so far it has not wobbled at all.

Anupam 20. Jul 2009 09:06 AM

Atleast you have given it a try tony. I want to go Linux too, but I am not able to give it a try yet. I am sure you can do all that on Linux, which you are able to do on windows. Its just a question of having patience and finding out things, and softwares to do the job. If you hold on enough, you might be able to do it :).

I am sure you will get ample help if you ask out here... from our Linux enthusiasts, who are already using Linux as their primary OS. There is lot of help out on the internet too.

Good luck :).

wdhpr 20. Jul 2009 09:32 PM

Quote:

Linux software is always more complicated and the GUI can be none existent.
Linux is indeed complicated. I believe the command line is the strong point when using Linux. You just can't read a manual and use Linux like windows. At least my limited mentality prevents me.

Debtboy Wrote a great easy to understand command line lesson

Linux command line intro

A very well done lesson on the web can be found here

I truly believe this is the key to harnessing the power of linux. Its a process and it will take some time for me at least.

Cheers
Wdhpr

tony 21. Jul 2009 10:00 AM

I thought I was safe by stating the fact that the comp was stable for a few days. Guess what, it did its usual thing and did its weird things not loading and changing kernels with updates and many different things. Not sure what to do now, I suppose I shall just have to put my hand in my pocket and buy a 64bit windows operating system. I am too early for Win7 as I need a OS NOW. This is working by the way on a Mint Linux disk 32bit which I had. Its the only way I can gain access quickly to see my emails and web search. Not the best of ways to work and use a comp!! :( :mad::mad:

Anupam 21. Jul 2009 10:52 AM

Have patience tony, and ask for help for the problems you are having on some forums. I know, Linux is not easy to work with, and also troubleshoot... specially for a person who is not at all familiar with Linux. But, once you get the hang of it... I think you will love it. Its matter of patience, and finding solutions to your problems, if you are willing :). But yes, if you don't have a working spare machine, things can be quite difficult.

1002richards 21. Jul 2009 05:36 PM

I settled on Mint using Mint4Win (their version of Wubi). Very pleased ... Mint found my wireless connection at once as it also did with my mobile broadband 'dongle'.

I've also tried a few other distos and booting from flashdrive using guides at PenDriveLinux.
Again , really impressed!!

bk_7312 22. Jul 2009 05:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tony (Post 9642)
I thought I was safe by stating the fact that the comp was stable for a few days. Guess what, it did its usual thing and did its weird things not loading and changing kernels with updates and many different things. Not sure what to do now, I suppose I shall just have to put my hand in my pocket and buy a 64bit windows operating system. I am too early for Win7 as I need a OS NOW. This is working by the way on a Mint Linux disk 32bit which I had. Its the only way I can gain access quickly to see my emails and web search. Not the best of ways to work and use a comp!! :( :mad::mad:

Why not use a portable Linux instead like Puppy or Slax? Puppy saves everything you do in a separate file on your hard disk (or anywhere you want) so that all your settings and files will not be lost. You could also try their multisession live-DVD (and CD). As for Slax, I haven't tried it yet but I heard it's good.

That way, you won't have to worry about these not loading or changing kernel problems on your system. In theory, a portable and not installed on your hard disk Linux should not cause these problems.

geekonabike 28. Aug 2009 09:21 PM

works straight out of the box
 
Look at Ubuntu run dual boot, stand alone, live CD or persistent USB stick It'll make you wonder why anybody Pays fow windows. www.ubuntu.org

lonny 02. Sep 2009 07:26 PM

"I shan't be able to work on my editorials without Windows.
"
OpenOffice just dosen't make the cut, if you have real work to do. Must be why 90+ % use Windows OS and programs for money work.

1002richards 03. Sep 2009 06:59 AM

In what ways is OpenOffice letting you down? Someone here might know the answer ... :)

MidnightCowboy 11. Sep 2009 12:00 AM

I too am now set up with dual booted 64 Bit versions of Vista Ultimate and Ubuntu. For those unfamiliar with my "problem" (yawn) :D I have to use a Sony Ericsson USB broadband modem to connect here (no cables) and none of the local likely lads are prepared to script anything else for it other than Ubuntu. I must say that the 9.04 is a great leap forward from the distro I viewed a while back but straight away I've encountered an issue I can do without. My temps with Vista are around 36/41/39 for CPU, North bridge and HD. With Ubuntu they are all way higher, my CPU not dropping below 54c. I've since discovered lots of posts about this with no real fix being offered. It seems to be an Ubuntu specific problem. I'm not sure if it also extends to Kubuntu which would be an alternative for me but I'm not prepared to fry my new mother board because the ambient temperatures here are high enough as it is.

Anyone here got any ideas?

bk_7312 12. Sep 2009 09:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MidnightCowboy (Post 12543)
I too am now set up with dual booted 64 Bit versions of Vista Ultimate and Ubuntu. For those unfamiliar with my "problem" (yawn) :D I have to use a Sony Ericsson USB broadband modem to connect here (no cables) and none of the local likely lads are prepared to script anything else for it other than Ubuntu. I must say that the 9.04 is a great leap forward from the distro I viewed a while back but straight away I've encountered an issue I can do without. My temps with Vista are around 36/41/39 for CPU, North bridge and HD. With Ubuntu they are all way higher, my CPU not dropping below 54c. I've since discovered lots of posts about this with no real fix being offered. It seems to be an Ubuntu specific problem. I'm not sure if it also extends to Kubuntu which would be an alternative for me but I'm not prepared to fry my new mother board because the ambient temperatures here are high enough as it is.

Anyone here got any ideas?

I am quite curious about the scripts written for the Sony Ericsson USB broadband modem. I was always under the impression that scripts for this Linux can and will work for another Linux provided that both Linux have the same scripting language like Python or Bash (the universal scripting language for Linux, A.K.A the command line) to run the script. So there shouldn't be any difference between scripting for Ubuntu or any other Linux right? So it might be possible to copy that script and use it in another Linux. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

I don't know much about the temperature problem but you could try to change the CPU usage. In my XP, there's a power manager that has an option to reduce CPU usage to increase the battery life (and decrease the temperature); in MEPIS Linux, there's KPowersave which lets you choose the 'CPU Frequency Policy' to increase battery life (and also decrease the temperature). I'm sure Ubuntu has such a tool too. Alternatively, try cooling the fan the physical way such as fanning it yourself :D.

MidnightCowboy 12. Sep 2009 11:34 AM

Hi, thanks for responding. I too was under the impression that scripts in the same language would be pretty universal between distros but apparently it has more to do with how each one recognises USB devices, rather than the configuration of them afterwards.
It actually seems since my original post that my problems are now fading. I checked the website for my Foxconn motherboard and it says that the cooling system runs at a constant speed until the temp reaches 55 after which it increases until the system stabilises. This I've checked and it's working. This therefore suggests that these temps are well within limits for the MB as mine is now hovering around 53. The CPU on it's own was never an issue anyway because the temperature for this can go way up before being a concern. It appears that this is more of a concern for laptop installations, some of which have a shut-down point of 60 degrees, hence most of the posts about this issue are from laptop owners.

I'm really liking Ubuntu although I still might download a variant of 9.04 with KDE3 and play with that. I just don't like V4 but think KDE (for me anyway) might be more visually appealing than Gnome.

1002richards 13. Sep 2009 04:57 AM

You could also have a look at Linux Mint. Based on Ubuntu but more "elegant" as they term it:
http://www.linuxmint.com/about.php

MidnightCowboy 13. Sep 2009 11:39 AM

Thanks for the suggestion. I did actually try mint from a live CD but didn't find it particularly stable. I even re burned another image at a different speed and got the same results. It's difficult to decipher the overall comments about mint because anyone wishing to get a closer resemblance to Windows is going to think it's great. From my own perspective, being able to switch on a PC and run it all day without problems is a real bonus and as Ubuntu is performing so well I'm going to stick with it. I hardly use the Vista except to update the security apps (LOL) :D

My feeling is that although some things move slowly in Linux land the ripples caused by Mint won't have gone unnoticed at Ubuntu and if a few candy tweaks is all it takes to recover market share then I'm pretty sure we might see something, or at least a promise of it, with the next release. So far, for what I need, I've only found one thing with Ubuntu that I'm unable to resolve but I'm still Googling through the forums. If I can't find a solution (it's not an important feature) then I'll post here, but I prefer to do this myself as it's the best way I'm gonna learn :)

drewbee 13. Sep 2009 05:07 PM

Before you go buy windows try Ubuntu 64 bit. It is the most stable and popular linux package with tons of community support. I run it on 2 laptops.

MidnightCowboy 13. Sep 2009 11:00 PM

I do actually have Ubuntu fully installed (64Bit) and dual booted with the 64 version of Vista Ultimate. I'm using the Vista less and less - discovering Screenlets is what finally swung me over :D

1002richards 14. Sep 2009 05:49 AM

I'm torn between the 'eye-candy' of Mint and the speed of Crunchbang and ( a new one to me) Masonux. I've still got Vista (but using it less & less too) and I keep going from dual boot to tri boot & back again.
Really it's great to have all this choice and to be able to pick & choose.

bk_7312 14. Sep 2009 06:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1002richards (Post 12709)
I'm torn between the 'eye-candy' of Mint and the speed of Crunchbang and ( a new one to me) Masonux. I've still got Vista (but using it less & less too) and I keep going from dual boot to tri boot & back again.
Really it's great to have all this choice and to be able to pick & choose.

What about moonOS? I heard it's quite fast and has a lot of eye-candy. It's also based on Ubuntu. It uses Enlightenment for its main edition and has a LXDE edition for slower PCs.

http://www.moonos.co.cc/

There's also some good reviews about it too:
http://desktoplinuxreviews.com/2009/...-linux-makara/
http://beginlinux.wordpress.com/2009...enshots-video/

Yes, it really is great to have all these choices to pick from. I suddenly feel like I want to be a distro-hopper, except I can't.

MidnightCowboy 14. Sep 2009 11:48 AM

Thanks for the pointers to these other distros, I'll check 'em out when I get some time.

wdhpr 14. Sep 2009 11:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1002richards View Post
I'm torn between the 'eye-candy' of Mint and the speed of Crunchbang and ( a new one to me) Masonux. I've still got Vista (but using it less & less too) and I keep going from dual boot to tri boot & back again.
Really it's great to have all this choice and to be able to pick & choose.
Wow its great to see all the converts over to linux. I have had Simply mepis running (dual boot) for two years now and have ironed out most kinks with the exception of getting my lexmark X1185 to work. (long story) :)

I have been thinking of switching to ubuntu 64bit. When I tried ubuntu a couple of years ago I had severe hardware issue's with my nvidia hardware and had to switch and then settled with Mepis. I have been hearing the new ubuntu distro's have come a long way and have ironed out allot of these issue's. My machine is 64 bit. I am running winxp 32 and dual boot to mepis 64 bit. Any thoughts about the new ubuntu disrto's

Cheers
Wdhpr

MidnightCowboy 15. Sep 2009 06:19 PM

Well, the version I flirted with before was Hardy Heron (8.04) which wasn't that long ago and certainly didn't inspire me to keep it over Windows which is why I was back with XP less than a month later. Now, having added some personal fluff to 9.04 I'm a real happy bunny :D

Even forgetting to switch on the firewall before my broadband is something to laugh about whereas with Windows I was spending more time monitoring and updating security apps than I was doing much else.

So far I've worked through pretty much everything that I would have done with Windows and the features with Ubuntu are as good or better, and for the most part quicker. In all honesty though I'm no power user so you would need to get a balanced opinion from someone in this category to make a direct comparison. My one and only gripe is the font rendering. It is better than it was but not as good or as "kind on the eyes" as the way Windows handles fonts. Maybe the upcoming 9.10 will show further improvements or maybe there's some geek type "fix" for this around that I've not discovered yet :D

Anupam 15. Sep 2009 06:30 PM

Its really good and heartening to see people taking up Linux, and enjoying it too. I have worked on Solaris, and little bit of Linux, when I was on the job. So, I have a fair knowledge of Unix/Linux working. Although, I have been out of touch from a long time, after I left my job.

I have been wanting to get Linux on my PC from a long time, but I haven't been able to manage that, because of the lack of a spare PC. Its my long desire to work on Linux at my home. Looking at all this talk of Linux going on, and new people enjoying it, I really feel like getting on a Linux machine.

Linux has come a far way, and continues to get better. Most of the routine tasks can be carried out from GUI. But, the real power of Linux/Unix lies in the command line. I would suggest the users of Linux, if they can, please download freely available books on Linux, and read them. There are plenty of books available on Linux, and all free. It would be really nice to know about Linux, and read more about it, to harness its real power. And its interesting too... it can be real fun.

A good starting place to look for Linux e-books is Linux Documentation Project. It has got some really nice material on Linux from beginners to expert users.
The main Linux site has also got beginner courses on Linux, which can be helpful. So, read more about Linux, and enjoy the experience :).

lonny 16. Sep 2009 06:02 AM

I use Debian...but...
 
"A lot of new users that come to GNU/Linux from Windows these days want an OS that will run all their favorite applications, is easy to use and basically ready to go out of the box. Ubuntu, being all of this, managed for the first time to make GNU/Linux more popular for the masses, no minor feat.
Since Ubuntu is de facto just a polished Debian, it hides sheer untamed cosmic power under the GUI hood.
After a while many Ubuntu users will feel 'adventurous' and will start looking for a less graphic and more CLI oriented experience.
In fact, as experienced GNU/Linux users well know, point and click "is the caveman way of doing things", therefore such developments are a win-win situation for everyone. "

Quoted from: http://www.fravia.com/linux.htm

Plenty of tips there! Enjoy

bk_7312 16. Sep 2009 09:07 AM

I think now would be a good time to introduce Slackware, the Linux distro that lets you do almost all the work. With it, you'll have to use the command line almost everytime you want to install something (not so sure about that, Slackware does have its own package manager, though it doesn't handle dependencies).

Although Slackware uses KDE, Slackware also features a text-based installer, command line reliance and no dependency handling. If a Linux newbie were to use Slackware as his first distro, given enough time (and determination and will power and bravery and more determination and other factors/characteristics), that newbie would come out a Linux guru. OK, slight exaggeration there but you get the point.

Two famous quote about Slackware:

Quote:

Give a man Ubuntu, and he'll learn Ubuntu. Give a man SUSE, and he'll learn SUSE. But give a man Slackware, and he'll learn Linux.

Once you go slack, you'll never go back!

lonny 16. Sep 2009 03:05 PM

What NO Magic-Pill?
 
"If a Linux newbie were to use Slackware as his first distro, given enough time (and determination and will power and bravery and more determination and other factors/characteristics), that newbie would come out a Linux guru. OK, slight exaggeration there but you get the point."

Then forget most of the peeps that love a mouse. They think a keyboard is a wrist support.

Slack lost me when I discovered apt-get. ;)

1002richards 17. Sep 2009 05:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bk_7312 (Post 12714)
What about moonOS? I heard it's quite fast and has a lot of eye-candy. It's also based on Ubuntu. It uses Enlightenment for its main edition and has a LXDE edition for slower PCs.

http://www.moonos.co.cc/

There's also some good reviews about it too:
http://desktoplinuxreviews.com/2009/...-linux-makara/
http://beginlinux.wordpress.com/2009...enshots-video/

Yes, it really is great to have all these choices to pick from. I suddenly feel like I want to be a distro-hopper, except I can't.


Thanks I'll have a look .... more choices!! :)

lonny 19. Sep 2009 04:21 PM

Hungry? Go To HotDonalds
 
Not as many choices on the menu, versus Linux with a easy 250+ flavors.

Quote:


"Let's imagine you have a brand-new PC with windoze on it. I'm not saying you SHOULD have a windoze PC, I'm just assuming you have, probably just because almost everybody else around you has, or because there was no other operating system choice in the shop you bought it: Praeterita mutare non possumus: our societies are a monopoly of the worst, let's face it.

I am not going to even try to push you onto the worthy GNU/Linux path... mostly because it is actually NOT necessary in my experience: you'll choose it by yourself - and ditch the windows operating system with gusto later - once you will have understood some basic lore :-)

Linux is free, blah blah, all its software is free, blah blah, and it's more stable and quicker than windows, blah blah... yet for the moment you are still using Windows. And you do not intend (yet) to change.
Well... So what? Why should you pay any money at all? Windows can be fully configured with good free "GPL" software (or other -less kosher- free software) that will cut pretty much any mustard. "

Quote from: http://www.fravia.com/bangla.htm

Even I use Windows.

A Mac is just BSD for the mouse lover in you.


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