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Old 22. Apr 2014, 12:28 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Question downloaded Linux to replace my os.. help?

First of all, my apologies if posting in the wrong place, but i think im not so far off.


Sooo... my Dell Inspiron 1545 with, Windows 7 professional 64 bit, had a faulty HD and died. I plan on using Linux as my main OS.

I have another hard drive from an hp which I had formatted to use as an external hd, with an aftermarket case. Im using that hd for now as a replacement for the broken one.

Anyway, i went ahead and downloaded the Linux OS from the site (709MG) for personal use, since Linux is free and I have curiosity.

After inserting it in the laptop to boot it, I received, "BOOT MGR missing". I googled it and now I know what that means.

My problem is that i dont have any computer cds at all.

HOW, WHAT, and WHERE, can i get the necessary tools to load the Linux OS?
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Old 22. Apr 2014, 06:14 AM   #2 (permalink)
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If you have access to another PC, try creating a USB installer for your Linux, instead of burning the ISO to a DVD (Check the distro FAQ first to make sure this is an option, although most of them can be launched into a live session this way now). You can use UNetbootin for this although lately I have had better success with Win32 Disk Imager.

http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/
http://sourceforge.net/projects/win32diskimager/

Make sure your USB drive is formatted to fat32 first, and for those with multiple drives, make sure to check the destination drive letter where your Linux is going to be copied to, to avoid overwriting another drive by mistake.
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Old 22. Apr 2014, 05:40 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MysticHaze View Post
...i went ahead and downloaded the Linux OS from the site (709MG) for personal use, since Linux is free and I have curiosity.
There are many Linux distros. It may help your case if you were to say which distro and/or provide the URL from where you downloaded the ISO.

BTW, once you still have the sticker with the Windows Product Key you may be able to download a Windows 7 professional 64 bit ISO and activate the installation with that Product Key. The download links can be found here: http://best-windows.vlaurie.com/boot-disks.html#full
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Old 24. Apr 2014, 12:45 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Thank You guys for your input.

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Originally Posted by Joe A.TT View Post
There are many Linux distros. It may help your case if you were to say which distro and/or provide the URL from where you downloaded the ISO.
Youre right, my bad.. I got the download address from gizmos actually>> http://www.ubuntu.com/. I downloaded the platform Ubuntu for personal use (which actually reads 733MB, if that even matters).

The downloaded file reads as follows "ubuntu-12.04.4-desktop-amd64"

I dont have anything. the computer is a "hand down", thats why i rather just do the linux for a while until i can buy a laptop.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MidnightCowboy View Post
If you have access to another PC, try creating a USB installer for your Linux, instead of burning the ISO to a DVD (Check the distro FAQ first to make sure this is an option, although most of them can be launched into a live session this way now). You can use UNetbootin for this although lately I have had better success with Win32 Disk Imager.

http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/
http://sourceforge.net/projects/win32diskimager/

Make sure your USB drive is formatted to fat32 first, and for those with multiple drives, make sure to check the destination drive letter where your Linux is going to be copied to, to avoid overwriting another drive by mistake.
Ok, well I used another computer to download Linux OS into the completely blank hard drive that ill be using as a replacement. I just checked and the HD is formatted to NTFS.

*Should i re-format the HD ill be using, to FAT32 like you say and then place the Downloaded OS back in it, along with either one of the installers from the sites you mentioned? or should my HD be blank and i should transfer the OS and installer to a USB and then load it from there?? or would it be ok if i keep the OS in the hard drive with the FAT32 format and place the installer in a USB (which also would be formatted to FAT32)???? wow, i guess I confused myself..

Ive never done this, but i want to do it. I just need some guidance, if you dont mind. If you dont want to help, its cool, ill keep trying lol.
I bet it would have been less of a hassle if it wasnt because of the missing BootMGR. One last thing, lol, sry; the sites you gave me for the installers, this helps me with the missing boot issue, to load Linux?? correct?
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Old 24. Apr 2014, 05:05 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by MysticHaze View Post



Ok, well I used another computer to download Linux OS into the completely blank hard drive that ill be using as a replacement. I just checked and the HD is formatted to NTFS.

*Should i re-format the HD ill be using, to FAT32 like you say and then place the Downloaded OS back in it, along with either one of the installers from the sites you mentioned? or should my HD be blank and i should transfer the OS and installer to a USB and then load it from there?? or would it be ok if i keep the OS in the hard drive with the FAT32 format and place the installer in a USB (which also would be formatted to FAT32)???? wow, i guess I confused myself..
I was only referring to formatting a USB stick you might be using to burn your Linux ISO to, and not the HD of your computer which should be left as is.

If you intend to install the Linux on it's own to the drive mentioned, this will appear as an option when you run the Linux installer, but anything already on that drive will be wiped, so any Linux ISO files you might have downloaded to it will need copying to another place first if you wish to keep them.
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Old 24. Apr 2014, 06:24 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Excuse the disjointed response(s) here but currently my internet connection is all over the place.

I'm also a little confused about how you are approaching this project.

As I understand it, you have downloaded a Linux distribution and now wish to install this?

This being the case, the Linux ISO file you have downloaded needs to be converted into an installable medium because you can't do this with it straight off from the downloaded file.

If using a Windows PC, you need to use preferably ImgBurn (Beware the bundled crap components when you install it!!) to burn the Linux ISO to a DVD. Alternatively you can use one of the programs I linked above to convert the downloaded ISO and write it to a USB key.

Once you have done this, you can boot the Linux into a live session on the computer it is to be installed on. IMO it is better to install from an already booted live session rather than to pick the "install Linux" option from the boot menu. If using a DVD, this process should start automatically if you insert the disk and then reboot. If using a USB key, you'll need to hit F11 or whichever other key is relevant to your computer during the boot process in order to run your live version of Linux.

Please make sure that the live session has fully loaded before you start clicking around. A DVD will take quite a bit longer to boot into a live session than a USB key and it is advisable to wait until the optical drive light stops blinking.

Most distros will plant an install icon onto the live session desktop and you can just launch this to get started. All installers include the same functions for choosing language, keyboard layout and other stuff, but the order in which they appear varies. At some point though you should be presented with an option to install your chosen Linux on its own (and wipe everything currently on the target drive!), or install it alongside Windows to create a dual boot if Windows is already installed and this is what you want. Not all Linux versions are this user friendly however and with some you will need to create drive partitions manually, which is another story.

Ubuntu though is pretty straight forward.
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Old 25. Apr 2014, 07:24 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MidnightCowboy View Post
Excuse the disjointed response(s) here but currently my internet connection is all over the place.

I'm also a little confused about how you are approaching this project.

As I understand it, you have downloaded a Linux distribution and now wish to install this?

This being the case, the Linux ISO file you have downloaded needs to be converted into an installable medium because you can't do this with it straight off from the downloaded file.

If using a Windows PC, you need to use preferably ImgBurn (Beware the bundled crap components when you install it!!) to burn the Linux ISO to a DVD. Alternatively you can use one of the programs I linked above to convert the downloaded ISO and write it to a USB key.

Once you have done this, you can boot the Linux into a live session on the computer it is to be installed on. IMO it is better to install from an already booted live session rather than to pick the "install Linux" option from the boot menu. If using a DVD, this process should start automatically if you insert the disk and then reboot. If using a USB key, you'll need to hit F11 or whichever other key is relevant to your computer during the boot process in order to run your live version of Linux.

Please make sure that the live session has fully loaded before you start clicking around. A DVD will take quite a bit longer to boot into a live session than a USB key and it is advisable to wait until the optical drive light stops blinking.

Most distros will plant an install icon onto the live session desktop and you can just launch this to get started. All installers include the same functions for choosing language, keyboard layout and other stuff, but the order in which they appear varies. At some point though you should be presented with an option to install your chosen Linux on its own (and wipe everything currently on the target drive!), or install it alongside Windows to create a dual boot if Windows is already installed and this is what you want. Not all Linux versions are this user friendly however and with some you will need to create drive partitions manually, which is another story.

Ubuntu though is pretty straight forward.
No worries, i did stay thinking, 'well.. uh, ok..'

AAAH... good info!


Ok, ill try to explain better..

*I have an old HP dv9000. In 2011, I was told the motherboard fried or something and that i
was better off buying a new laptop; so I pulled out the hard drive, bought a case, and made
it my portable External Hard Drive.

*My Dad gives me his DELL Inspiron 1545 that year. About 2 months ago, this computers hard
drive dies. (I got warnings of bad blocks before it died, so I managed to save my data to
the External I mentioned above. I also tried doing system backups and blah blah, but
none of that worked. I kept using it like that until it just failed.
)

*So Im without a computer and i need it. I have not worked due to medical issues for about
6-8 months, so i cant buy windows and i dont want to burrow money from Mommy :/. This
is why I thought of Linux until i begin to work. I had been curious about it anyway, so this is
the time to try it out. I burrow Moms Vaio, but shes very, hmm, special with her computer
and doesnt always lend it to me. I have some of the DELLs data saved in her laptop(music
pictures,documents)

**Anyway, my idea is to replace the broken HD from the DELL, with the External HD.

What I did was: transferred all the data from my External to Moms Vaio;
I re-formatted the External to NTFS again, then,to answer your question, I downloaded Linux IOS and saved it on the newly reformatted External;
I took the case off of the External and inserted that hard drive into my DELL, then i turned it on and to meet the msg stating "BOOTMGR missing". But im guessing that once i get the Linux to a cd and intall it, that problem will be no more, since the new OS files has everything to load itself, correct???
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
cool, thanks for the hints, i got it. I wasnt aware about having to burn it to a cd. I thought, well, the OS is in the computers hd, the computer will see it, and it will sort through the files to boot it, then i would just do the clicking.. My logic was wrong lol. Then again i had a suspicion because on the downloaded file, i cant open it, when i double click, it takes me to "Roxio Easy Media Creator" haha...
Ok then, ill go ahead and copy it to a cd. The computer im using, moms, has Roxio, is that alright, does it make any difference instead of using the one u recommended?? I would say no, but youre the expert here, and my internet blows at downloads for now.
I would have to go through the pain of doing it through a CD. i lost my flashdrive, i only have an 8gb sd card.

**Question- ill still download the intstallers you mentioned, just to have them saved; but the one that reads "..Win32diskimager" still work for 64bit?

Ive read a bit about partitioning, sounds fun.. Ill do it when i get a new laptop. For now, the HD ill be using, like i mentioned, will be completely blank only for Linux. This will be fine i suppose?

My bad for the late reply, i was typing it till 2 am and got sleepy, then i just forgot about it, the next day. Hope i made myself clear

Thank You tons for the help man.
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Old 25. Apr 2014, 07:46 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Any software capable of burning an ISO image will be fine. Most Linux distros these days though require a DVD as opposed to CD because the file size is too big to fit on the latter.

The disk imaging program should work with any version of Windows.

If you are using the whole of the target HD to install Linux into, it will create it's own partition layout so you won't need to worry about this.

Be sure though to check out the FAQ for your chosen distro first for information about how to install it correctly to an external drive if this is the intended result.
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