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Old 08. Aug 2012, 04:10 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Question Linux noob questions

Softwares downloaded for Linux are in a tar.bz2 format and upon extraction, I couldn't find a single exe file to execute. How in the world do you execute and run them?

For example I just download Midori browser for Linux here: http://linux.softpedia.com/progDownl...oad-32521.html
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Old 08. Aug 2012, 05:59 AM   #2 (permalink)
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The easiest (and safest) way to install additional programs is to only get them from the distro repository by using their "software center" app or whatever else they use for a package manager. If what you want is not in the repositories, then each distro will have a wiki about how to install programs downloaded from other sources. Often this is as simple as just double-clicking the downloaded file and following the instructions. It's also worth noting that sometimes files are available in a variety of formats so you need to be sure to get the one that your distro's package manager can handle.
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Old 08. Aug 2012, 07:02 AM   #3 (permalink)
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http://www.tuxfiles.org/linuxhelp/softinstall.html
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Old 08. Aug 2012, 07:10 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Softwares downloaded for Linux are in a tar.bz2 format and upon extraction, I couldn't find a single exe file to execute. How in the world do you execute and run them?
Mc Is correct, until you become more familiar with Linux you should stick with software found in your Software Manager. If your distro supports .deb packages such as Ubuntu or Mint you can usually download it and install it using the Gdeb package installer or the Apt package installer from your Context Menu but again this software will have a .deb extension. Otherwise you may have to compile the package manually which may include installing all of the required dependencies.

For those pesky dependency issues look here: http://everydaylht.com/howtos/system...m-source-code/

Last edited by wdhpr; 08. Aug 2012 at 07:45 AM.
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Old 08. Aug 2012, 09:21 AM   #5 (permalink)
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The easiest way is to go to Ubuntu Apps Directory to get the app you need here:
https://apps.ubuntu.com/cat/applications/midori/

Click the orange download button, and it installs the app right away to your system.

I tried it on both Ubuntu and Mint using Chrome and Firefox and they worked nearly like the way you do with the Google Play Store or Apple's App Store. If you're running the current release of Ubuntu and click that button, it opens up in the Ubuntu Software Center app for you to confirm to install. Looks like now all major OS suppliers like to go this way, including the upcoming Microsoft's Marketplace.
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Old 09. Aug 2012, 12:35 AM   #6 (permalink)
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If you arent using a Distro with a software center, I recommend installing one. Ubuntu I found to be great for beginners.
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Old 09. Aug 2012, 04:12 AM   #7 (permalink)
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By the way guys am using Linux Mint.
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Old 09. Aug 2012, 04:18 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Anyway thanks for the info guys....Another question is how much space do you need to give to Mint in the C: directly in case you're dual booting it with Windows. I gave nearly 20GB of free space, while the installation took place only for 5.7GB. Was it a waste to give this much, considering the fact that am now tight on disk space, or is there any worth to giving up the extra space to install various applications for Mint?
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Old 09. Aug 2012, 04:44 AM   #9 (permalink)
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I gave nearly 20GB of free space, while the installation took place only for 5.7GB. Was it a waste to give this much, considering the fact that am now tight on disk space, or is there any worth to giving up the extra space to install various applications for Mint?
20 GB should be fine for now.
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Old 10. Aug 2012, 03:39 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wdhpr View Post
20 GB should be fine for now.
Thanks. But what i was asking is that, what happens to the rest 14GB that was allocated? Would it be utilized for any useful purpose like installing Linux applications and the like?
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