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Old 30. Dec 2017, 03:37 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Can extra RAM make any difference on SSD with 8G?

Have room for extra stick of 8Gs of RAM on an SSD which already has 8Gs.
Wondering if it's worth the money.
Computer store has one at $61.00 u.s. taxes included
Would rather encourage here than internet (eBay).

Some on the internet say it will help games only.
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Old 30. Dec 2017, 04:55 PM   #2 (permalink)
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According to this article by Tom's Hardware, extra RAM would decrease number of writes to SSD.
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Old 30. Dec 2017, 05:15 PM   #3 (permalink)
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An extra 8GB of system RAM would help; if your then (presumed) 2x8GB is in dual-channel mode, it would help the CPU/GPU more as well.

For best overall performance get a matching stick to your current one, or buy a matched pair - assuming your rig can use dual-channel, that is.
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Old 30. Dec 2017, 07:20 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Thank you satrow!

Appreciate hearing about that complimentary info.
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Old 31. Dec 2017, 12:05 AM   #5 (permalink)
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I really depends on your usage. The best thing is to check how much RAM your system is currently actively using. Since you've already got Process Hacker on your system, you can always just try letting it run in the background to get a good idea on how many resources your system is using over time. I have it running in the background all the time - I just set the refresh interval to 10 seconds. Then you can go into system information and see your resource usage history for at least the last two hours - if you have enough monitor real estate, you can get it to display around 7 or 8 hours of resource usage history, if not more (I had to stretch it out across 3 full HD monitors to be able to see all the history). See what that does - if the physical memory is above around 90% often, then it's definitely worth getting the extra RAM. Otherwise, it's sort of dependant on your budget
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Old 31. Dec 2017, 10:48 AM   #6 (permalink)
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It might be simpler to monitor page file usage with TaskMan's performance tab, page file usage will only need checking a couple of times per session; I use PageFileUsageMonitor (http://www.standards.com/ThisAndThat...geMonitor.html) It helps me quickly keep track and not to waste drive space on an overly large page file.

I don't use SuperFetch, my system with 16GB RAM and SSDs simply sees no benefit from it, so my memory Cached numbers are much lower than they would be at default settings (saves a few CPU ticks and reduces the Services count).

Hardware benchmark, stock settings exc. for undervolted System RAM, so tuned for efficiency as a general purpose PC (as is my W7): http://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/3474094
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Old 31. Dec 2017, 09:14 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Sorry, but i don't really grasp what "page file" is about.

With Process Lasso, have been watching it over the last while and with Outlook 2013, Firefox with a Youtube running, and Word open, RAM usage seems to float in between 44% and 53%.
Seeing that i don't do much gaming (other than FreeCell) or other intensive work like video editing - probably don't need extra RAM.

Wonder if installing a "Windows 10 Pro No Bloatware Edition" i spotted on MajorGeeks today would have an impact? Don't use Edge - so i imagine that just that would take away a bunch of resource consuming things i don't need.
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Old 01. Jan 2018, 01:44 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Computers and Operating systems are built for general purpose use; if your machine is primarily single User, especially with a relatively limited workflow, you could potentially increase efficiency by looking for bottlenecks in the System and checking which parts of your normal usage (workflow) trigger them.

If your normal sessions trigger a lot of page file usage that increases over time, you might be able to simply modify your workflow to minimise them (perhaps by simply closing programs/tabs sooner, etc.).

Page file usage soaks up some of your performance as dumping data to a (hard) drive kills responsiveness (less so to an SSD); some software uses the page file by default as soon as you enter 'Edit mode' (like Word and even Notepad), other software uses the page file only when the PC is under 'memory pressure' (the memory usage is already high), still others will use it by default (like many video/photo editing software).

Adding extra memory (non-dual channel) will mainly add time to how long your sessions can go on (or how many concurrent software you can run) before the memory pressure builds up (Windows increases PF usage faster, loading/opening gets slower = more 'lag' with time).

Shifting from single- to dual channel memory will improve responsiveness (bigger 'pipe' = CPU/memory/data/GPU flow might be ~5-15% faster under pressure) and the extra RAM will still allow longer 'low-lag' sessions.



The No Bloatware Edition might well be suitable for your usage and should also be more responsive than your current version but there might be some drawbacks as well. Only you can judge whether it would be better for you than your current Windows version is.
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Old 01. Jan 2018, 03:27 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Thanks!

Think what you said about Word (applies to Outlook too?) can explain why the system occasionally goes to a grinding halt.

Now i'm starting to wonder if the Kingston 120G wouldn't do better than the new PNY my friend recently installed.
http://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/6567692
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Old 02. Jan 2018, 04:14 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Speaking about SSD size/performance generally, a modern 250/256->480/525 from a quality SSD company (Intel/Samsung/Crucial/Micron/... ) is faster/more responsive than any of the older/smaller drives esp. cf. to those from companies that do not design/produce their own hardware but only build using hardware/firmware supplied through normal channels (companies that buy in all the component parts).

I suspect that Kingston is a company that falls somewhere between the stools; depending on the exact model/size, it might come close to the performance/reliability of the top 4/5 makers - mostly! But the age of the design and the capacity makes a difference.

Note that the benchmark given with the PNY (I wouldn't consider one) is using single channel/1 RAM stick - if that 'board can run dual channel (not all notebook 'boards have that facility), the CPU and the SSD would also perform/benchmark faster with a pair of sticks in dual channel mode (possibly also the GPU to a lesser extent, esp. since that AMD GPU seems slower than I'd expect from the iGPU built into the Intel CPU!), though because it would then be powering a second memory stick, the battery uptime would take a slight hit.

I stopped using MS Office products ~10 years ago because of their performance issues (Outlook's database can grow huge and can cause big 'lag' hits), it's better suited to a dedicated PC imo.

You might improve overall session performance by using Office at the beginning and end of a session, closing it fully in between; once closed, run a memory cleanup tool like Memory Cleaner (https://www.koshyjohn.com/software/memclean/).

Don't set it to run in the background, just make a coffee after closing the Office components, then open it (check/note the virtual pagefile %) and Trim the working set, followed by clearing the System cache - if you're lucky and Office wasn't using a huge amount of resources, it shouldn't result in any extra data getting dumped into your page file, all pre-cached/loaded data (used and unused) will be flushed, resulting in what should be very close to a freshly booted Windows, ready for your browsing or other normal workload.

Last edited by MidnightCowboy; 02. Jan 2018 at 06:48 PM. Reason: Removed sexist remark
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