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Old 15. Jan 2016, 05:32 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default How useful is an e-mail client

I have have never used an e-mail client. I just check my e-mails, reply to them, delete what I don't want, rarely save one that has information that I want to refer to later, and that's it.

What advantage is there in using an e-mail client?
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Old 15. Jan 2016, 05:54 AM   #2 (permalink)
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One interface instead of different interfaces for different webmail sites, e.g. outlook.com is different to gmail.com.
Manage several accounts from one place - I have several mail accounts from hotmail/outlook, gmail, this site, my ISP,... .
Store saved emails in one place even if they were sent/received on different account
Share an email account with other people who can each receive the same incoming emails on their clients. We always have at least one family account
Download emails to PC while online so you can work on them offline (not connected to the Internet).
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Old 15. Jan 2016, 01:30 PM   #3 (permalink)
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As Remah says. If you have more than one email account using e.g. Thunderbird makes life that bit easier.
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Old 15. Jan 2016, 02:27 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Melita, at one time I didn't use an email client either. I just used to access my email accounts via a browser. However, when I started using Thunderbird I began to see the benefits. Remah has already covered most of those but here are some more...
  • You have the option of setting up a master password for your email client. You may want to do this is your environment isn't very secure.
  • Thunderbird comes with a calendar and reminder add-on called Lightning. Using Lightning and Dropbox, I sync all my reminders for appointments, birthdays, anniversaries, etc. between Linux and Windows. That way, I doesn't matter whether I am in Linux or Windows, my reminders are always up to date and the same.
  • Likewise, I use an add-on called TZPush to sync my Hotmail contacts with Thunderbird. Changes in one are automatically reflected in the other.
Finally, an email client is not for everyone. If you only ever have a single email account and your needs are simple you may not reap any benefit from using an email client.
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Old 15. Jan 2016, 04:42 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe A.TT View Post
Melita, at one time I didn't use an email client either...................You have the option of setting up a master password for your email client. You may want to do this is your environment isn't very secure
I was under the impression that it is less secure to have a master password. i.e. If the password is hacked all e-mail accounts will be compromised. It looks like I am mistaken.

My environment is 'home' and it is secure.

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Old 15. Jan 2016, 06:37 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Melita, I think you are misunderstanding how Thunderbird works. Whenever you add an email account to Thunderbird you must provide the login credential for that account (i.e. username and password). Thereafter, whenever you start Thunderbird it will automatically log in to that email account using the credentials you provided earlier. The same applies to all email accounts that you set up with Thunderbird. The purpose of the master password is to prevent unauthorized access to the email client. However, for an unauthorized person to have access to Thunderbird they must first compromise your computer. If that ever happens you may have a lot more to worry about than your email accounts.
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Old 15. Jan 2016, 07:37 PM   #7 (permalink)
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A slightly different question--for those of you who use Thunderbird, have any of you used Outlook and how do they compare?

Because my work uses Outlook, I've always used Outlook at home. However, I'd very much be willing to use a free office suite IF I could find something to replace Outlook with. From Joe's post below, it looks like you might be able to use Thunderbird as a suitable replacement?!

Does anyone know if Thunderbird will accept a calendar appointment sent from Outlook?

P.S. I know that I mentioned a commercial product, but my question is about Thunderbird, not the commercial product.
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Old 15. Jan 2016, 08:05 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Kendall, I have never used Outlook but I found this. Maybe you could try it to see if it works.
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Old 15. Jan 2016, 10:09 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kendall.a View Post
P.S. I know that I mentioned a commercial product, but my question is about Thunderbird, not the commercial product.
It would be very hard to ask about replacing a product if you couldn't tell us the product name.

Here's a solution to use Thunderbird with Exchange:
http://www.slsmk.com/replace-outlook...h-thunderbird/ (VirusTotal found no problems)

The second add-on, Exchange Connector, is now downloaded from https://github.com/Ericsson/exchangecalendar/releases
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Last edited by Remah; 15. Jan 2016 at 10:09 PM. Reason: Layout
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Old 15. Jan 2016, 11:50 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe A.TT View Post
Melita, I think you are misunderstanding how Thunderbird works. Whenever you add an email account to Thunderbird you must provide the login credential for that account (i.e. username and password). Thereafter, whenever you start Thunderbird it will automatically log in to that email account using the credentials you provided earlier. The same applies to all email accounts that you set up with Thunderbird. The purpose of the master password is to prevent unauthorized access to the email client. However, for an unauthorized person to have access to Thunderbird they must first compromise your computer. If that ever happens you may have a lot more to worry about than your email accounts.
Yes Joe I did misunderstand. Thank you for explaining. I have been using Linux Q4OS for about a month now and Thunderbird has been very prominently staring at me from my desktop all this while. I think I'll play with it a little and see whether I want it

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Last edited by Melita-s; 15. Jan 2016 at 11:51 PM. Reason: edit text
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