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Old 08. Apr 2015, 06:05 PM   #21 (permalink)
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Melita, most likely all or most of your system resources are in use at the time of these freezes so you won't be able to use the Snipping Tool. Most likely, when you were eventually able to take some screenshots the processes which were eating up your resources were no longer doing so. As a result, the screenshots you posted won't be of much help. Of course, if we can have screenshots that would be ideal, but since you can't obtain screenshots at the actual time when the freezes are taking place, the next best option would be to take a picture with a digital camera or smart phone and post that instead. Just make sure the picture is clear.

Looking at your screenshots, I believe what you highlighted were processes that were using a lot of RAM. However, in order to determine which processes may be using up your resources you must also look at CPU usage. From your screenshots, I believe the CPU column would be the one indicated below...



You can drag the column as explained below to make sure it's in fact the CPU column. And yes, you can leave Task Manager at the default. For that matter, let's not bother with Event Viewer, Process Monitor, etc. for now. Let's concentrate on what Task Manager has to show for now.


Expanding Task Manager Columns

First of all, keep in mind when you expand columns or the Task Manager window it will occupy more space on your screen.

1. To Expand a Column



Hover over the beginning or end of a column header. When the cursor turns into a double-headed arrow drag it to the right or left to increase or decrease the width of the column.


2. To Make the Task Manager windows bigger or smaller

If you add more columns or increase the width of the columns you may need to increase the size of the Task Manager window to see all the columns.



Hover over the right or left edge of the Task Manager window until the cursor turns into a double-headed arrow. Drag to adjust the width of the window. You can also drag a corner to resize two boundaries at once.

Note: I'm on Windows 8.1 so my Task Manager will look slightly different to yours.

Last edited by Joe A.TT; 08. Apr 2015 at 06:13 PM.
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Old 08. Apr 2015, 06:30 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Your svchost.exe appears to be using a ton of memory! I would encourage you to do a Google search for "svchost using alot of memory windows 7" or something similar. You will find a ton of listings. One such listing that might be helpful is:

http://superuser.com/questions/69373...ing-my-pc-down

There are a lot of possible reasons for this. It may take a fair amount of detective work to figure it out.
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Old 08. Apr 2015, 07:53 PM   #23 (permalink)
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Hello Joe,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe A.TT View Post
Melita, most likely all or most of your system resources are in use at the time of these freezes so you won't be able to use the Snipping Tool. Most likely, when you were eventually able to take some screenshots the processes which were eating up your resources were no longer doing so. As a result, the screenshots you posted won't be of much help.
The freeze lasted about 20 mts. I got the snipping tool going twice during the freeze (on both occassions, after labouring for about 3 mts. and numerous mouse clickings). This is quite typical. As I mentioned in my first post, some activity is still possible but it takes an awfully long time. The snips are real time, taken actually during the freeze.

I noticed that svchost.exe was furiously active and that is what made me high light that on the snips. I got furiously active myself , with the snipping tool, to grab this during the freeze. Before and after the freeze, svchost.exe is not seen in Task manager. Even as I write this it is still missing!

Last evening too, I observed this identical activity of svchost.exe, only during the freeze, but I wanted to spend some time observing what is going on, before I posted here.
HTML Code:
You can drag the column as explained below to make sure it's in fact the CPU column.
I did, and it is the CPU.

The rest of your help is gratefully noted.

Regards,
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Old 08. Apr 2015, 08:21 PM   #24 (permalink)
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Hello Kendall.a,

Quote:
Originally Posted by kendall.a View Post
Your svchost.exe appears to be using a ton of memory! I would encourage you to do a Google search for "svchost using alot of memory windows 7" or something similar. You will find a ton of listings. One such listing that might be helpful is:
http://superuser.com/questions/69373...ing-my-pc-down
There are a lot of possible reasons for this. It may take a fair amount of detective work to figure it out.
Thank you. I'll try to find some information as you suggest.

The significant thing is the timing. This always happens in the morning, 10 mts. after I wake up the computer from sleep. Before and after the freeze (lasting 20 to 30 mts.), the computer is almost as good as new! This also happens again towards late evening. I will observe to see whether there is also a particular time period before the evening event.

It looks to me like some programme that I am not running, is coming on automatically and unannounced, to bleed the computer resources. I wonder what the '10 mts' means.

Regards,
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Old 08. Apr 2015, 10:27 PM   #25 (permalink)
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If your screenshots were taken during the freeze and not before or after the freeze, then I suppose we'll work with them. Let's concentrate on the process that's using the most RAM - that would be the PID 376. During a freeze, and when it is using the most RAM, see if you can right-click on it and select "Go to Service(s). The highlighted services would be the ones that are active under that PID. Make a note of these services. Maybe you can take some pictures too. Let me know what these services are.
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Old 09. Apr 2015, 12:08 PM   #26 (permalink)
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@Joe A.TT, great screenshots again.

There are many programs including device drivers and services that can schedule themselves to run with a delayed start. Google update and Adobe Reader do this. But I can't think of any that wait 600 seconds (ten minutes). Windows does wait 600 seconds to process group policy during Winlogon.


@Melita, I generally use a camera or phone to take a photo of the screen so I'm not dependent upon the resources that are tied up on my computer.

There are three basic questions I would like you to answer to narrow down probable causes:

During the freeze is the "System idle" process normally not zero?
It looks more likely that your computer is memory constrained as you have available CPU time because the "System idle" process is not zero.

Is the disk thrashing, i.e. working hard during the freeze?
Running out of physical memory can lead to disk-thrashing as Windows keeps having to load and unload items in physical memory to virtual memory which is stored on disk. If disk-thrashing is happening then the hard disk light will be on all the time during the freeze.

Are you using up all your computer's physical memory?
In Task Manager you can check how much physical memory is used by Clicking on the "Performance" tab. There is a graph "Physical Memory Usage History" that will show you if you are running out of free physical memory which is the 2GB you have installed in your computer.

If you are running out of physical memory then you can use the "Processes" tab to see what is using a lot of "Memory (Private Working Set)" which you can sort by clicking on the column heading so the largest usage appears first.

If you are not running out of physical memory then there are other options we can look at.
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Old 09. Apr 2015, 12:55 PM   #27 (permalink)
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Excellent suggestions Remah. I appreciate your chiming in and sharing your experience.
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Old 09. Apr 2015, 08:32 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Remah View Post
There are many programs including device drivers and services that can schedule themselves to run with a delayed start. Google update and Adobe Reader do this. But I can't think of any that wait 600 seconds (ten minutes). Windows does wait 600 seconds to process group policy during Winlogon.
Actually it is about 20 mts. The 10 mts. is the time it takes for the freeze to begin, after I 'wake' the computer and start work on it. all my updates are selected for manual.
Quote:
@Melita, I generally use a camera or phone to take a photo of the screen so I'm not dependent upon the resources that are tied up on my computer.
Do you mean, to connect a phone or camera to the computer and take screen shots, or to point either of them at the computer screen and shoot? I am new to this
Quote:
Is the disk thrashing, i.e. working hard during the freeze?
Running out of physical memory can lead to disk-thrashing as Windows keeps having to load and unload items in physical memory to virtual memory which is stored on disk. If disk-thrashing is happening then the hard disk light will be on all the time during the freeze.
I have no disk light on my laptop.

Quote:
Are you using up all your computer's physical memory?
In Task Manager you can check how much physical memory is used by Clicking on the "Performance" tab. There is a graph "Physical Memory Usage History" that will show you if you are running out of free physical memory which is the 2GB you have installed in your computer.

If you are running out of physical memory then you can use the "Processes" tab to see what is using a lot of "Memory (Private Working Set)" which you can sort by clicking on the column heading so the largest usage appears first.

If you are not running out of physical memory then there are other options we can look at.
I think I am running out of physical memory. I observed this value in the high nineties, during the freeze. I'll confirm this and the other details you ask for, after the next freeze.

Regards,
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Old 09. Apr 2015, 09:21 PM   #29 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Melita-s View Post
...or to point either of them at the computer screen and shoot?
Yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melita-s View Post
I think I am running out of physical memory. I observed this value in the high nineties, during the freeze. I'll confirm this and the other details you ask for, after the next freeze.
Please do.
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Old 10. Apr 2015, 12:57 AM   #30 (permalink)
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@Melita

Using close to 100% of physical memory could be the problem because it will involve swapping memory data out to virtual memory on disk. You should be able to hear your hard drive operating even if you don't have a disk in-use indicator of any sort.

The first step in reducing high memory usage is to stop all but the most important programs that are using your precious memory. I would use CCleaner to disable startup programs that you don't need to have running all the time. Under the "Tools" menu you can view all your "Startup" items under various tabs including "Windows", your web browsers, and "Scheduled Tasks".

If you are unsure what to disable then ask here.

In the long run the best option, as others have already mentioned, is to increase the physical memory in your computer. There is lots of help, e.g. from PC Magazine on how to do this and you can probably find the exact process for your brand and model of laptop.
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