Gizmos Freeware Reviews  

Go Back   Gizmo's Freeware Forum > Freeware Forum > General Computer Support

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02. Dec 2013, 07:36 PM   #21 (permalink)
Full Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 30
Default

Well, I changed my mind : going for a desktop instead of a laptop. I will not get around to backing up my XP before the changeover, except backing up My Documents on Google Drive, which turned out to be a major debacle instead of a benefit, from which I intend to soon disentangle myself.

I am going to get a 2TB internal hard drive instead of a ready-made external hard drive. What I put it in is not yet determined.

I see a pretty good price on a Toshiba 2TB 3.5" Bare DT01ACA Series Hard Disk Drive : 7200 RPM, SATA/600, 64 MB buffer size, 2 year warranty. And "Low Power"--why would it be advertising that?

Quote:
Normally external drives power down when not connected but it is useful to have a HDD that can power down when it has not been used for x minutes. That will save you a lot of power, generate less heat, and is a feature of more expensive units.
That sounds good, Remah. How do I know which ones will do that?






Windows XP
Home Edition
Version 2002
32-bit
Service Pack 3

Dell DIMENSION DIM2400
Intel(R)
Pentium(R) 4 CPU 2.66GHz
x86 Family 15 Model 2 Stepping 9
2.05 GB of RAM
Graphics Card: Intel(R) 82845G/GL/GE/PE/GV
Graphics Controller, 64 Mb
Hard Drive Size 114.4GB
Free Space was 35.8GB; now under 20GB because after backing up My Documents on Google Drive, Google Drive has duplicated the whole darn thing on my hard drive
Motherboard: Dell Computer Corp., 0G1548
Antivirus : Webroot Internet Security
conceptualclarity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02. Dec 2013, 09:37 PM   #22 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,741
Default

There are drives that do it without any configuration. WD Green drives are the best known example. The main caveat for such drives is that are designed for infrequent use or low load so they far from ideal for file servers, RAID and multiuser applications. The power saving features will interfere with operation and under heavy use can reduce the drive life expectancy.
Quote:
WD Green hard drives are tested and recommended for use in PCs as secondary storage, external enclosures and other applications that require cool and quiet operation.*
*Desktop drives are not recommended for use in RAID environments, please consider using WD Red hard drives for home and small office 1-5 bay NAS systems and WD Enterprise hard drives for rackmount and >5 bay NAS systems
You can also configure power saving features for HDDs in Windows power settings. IMO, set the idle time at least 10 minutes so the drives aren't continually turning off and on again. As the article points out Windows does use idle periods for other tasks.
__________________
Better to light a candle ... than to curse the darkness.
Remah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02. Dec 2013, 09:51 PM   #23 (permalink)
Super Moderator
 
Anupam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: India
Posts: 15,275
Default

Don't go for WD Green drives. They are highly unreliable. I had a bad experience with it recently. We had bought it for a friend of mine, and it went bad after an year or so. On the internet too, I read that it's not a reliable drive.

Also, somewhere WD themselves say that these drives are not to be relied upon as a data drive.
__________________
Anupam
Anupam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02. Dec 2013, 09:56 PM   #24 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,741
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anupam View Post
...
Also, somewhere WD themselves say that these drives are not to be relied upon as a data drive.
It's at the link I provided above. The text in the quote is from that page.
__________________
Better to light a candle ... than to curse the darkness.
Remah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02. Dec 2013, 09:56 PM   #25 (permalink)
Super Moderator
 
Anupam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: India
Posts: 15,275
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Remah View Post
It's at the link I provided above. The text in the quote is from that page.
Ah yes, I missed that .
__________________
Anupam
Anupam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02. Dec 2013, 10:28 PM   #26 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,741
Default

I should also add that the WD Green drives are fine as "data drives" as they are particularly useful for fan-less home theater PCs (HTPCs) where the drive is not in use for long periods and when it is in use it is continuously for hours (e.g. watching a movie) where you don't want to hear them.

They are not intended for use in systems that have continuous repeating or sporadic activity because the frequency of the spin down/spin up cycle does affect long-term reliability. Scenarios where they shouldn't be used include:
  • as a system drive - too much operating system (OS) overhead
  • with a paging file (virtual memory) - OS can reorganize paging contents even when the system is idle
  • being regularly monitored by S.M.A.R.T. - it will wake the drive
  • with regular syncing of the file system (eg Linux) - can be every 5 seconds - or with automatic drive defragmentation
  • with delayed writes (write-back) - the delay might be 10 seconds or more meaning the drive has powered down in the interval
In these case the drive will either never power down because the WD Green power-saving interval is something like every 8 seconds of inactivity, or it will be continually powering down and powering up again.
__________________
Better to light a candle ... than to curse the darkness.

Last edited by Remah; 02. Dec 2013 at 10:30 PM. Reason: Corrected spelling/grammar
Remah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02. Dec 2013, 10:50 PM   #27 (permalink)
Full Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 30
Default

Thanks, gentlemen, that's great information.

My first order of business is to buy a new computer. I'm going to get a custom-built computer from an eBay outfit with an exceptionally stellar record, allpczone. It's at http://www.ebay.com/itm/INTEL-CORE-i...item565e5e467f

I could save a lot of money by going with Seagate. A very knowledgeable techie on another site said :
Quote:
I avoid Seagate like the plague and few other people I know in the business do too. From personal experience over the years, Seagate drive failure rates have far outweighed all other manufacturers combined.
Your comments?

I want to put two 1 TB hard drives in it. Somebody you all know very well suggested :

Quote:
RAID 0 those drives, they should be faster (nearly twice than by themselves theoretically) than a 2 TB drive. Do note that if one fails, both will lose data due to the way RAID 0 works.

...You might experience problems with programs like disk imaging if their rescue media don't have the proper RAID drivers. Otherwise it run like a normal hard drive, except faster and larger. Just note that the 2 drives are inseparable now without losing data (which you can backup).
Any comments on this?
conceptualclarity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03. Dec 2013, 06:30 AM   #28 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,741
Default

I see your threads/posts at other sites Seagate drives and RAID 0.

Your PC
If you're getting Intel HD 400 graphics then you should get more than 4GB of RAM if you're planning on using FullHD (1920x1080p).

Seagate
I've seen more Seagate drive failures than any other brand but that is only because I've seen many more Seagate drives including their drives rebadged for PC vendors. I don't have any issue with them and I can remember when they were wildly popular. Instead fitness for use is usually the key. If you buy a cheap drive then don't use it outside the manufacturer's guidelines.

RAID
A lot of gamers run RAID 0 because it is fast without losing storage space. But I've noticed it is getting less popular because SSDs are so much faster. Why do you need the speed? An SSD or more RAM might be better solutions.

RAID 0 reduces overall reliability. If 1% failure (ie 99% reliable) a year then you'll be nearly doubling the risk of failure to 1.99% (98.01% reliable). That's why other gamers* use RAID 1 because it has data redundancy and potentially allows fast parallel reads similar to RAID 0 (depends on the controller). The cost of slower writes is not so important for games where most of the activity is reads. See Wikipedia RAID comparison

Personally, I prefer software RAID and don't use hardware RAID because of the metadata stored on the disks which limits recovery options to compatible controllers. I also don't use RAID 0 because I prefer my PC to keep running and I want to avoid having to recover data.


*PS I'm using gamers as examples not saying that you are one.
__________________
Better to light a candle ... than to curse the darkness.

Last edited by Remah; 03. Dec 2013 at 06:32 AM. Reason: PS
Remah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03. Dec 2013, 08:12 AM   #29 (permalink)
Full Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 30
Default

Thanks, Remah.

I have suffered for a long time on a computer with lousy specs. I'm not a gamer. I'm someone who likes to run a lot of programs realtime (examples--Clipboard Help+Spell, Process Explorer, Zemana Antikeylogger). I also like to have a lot of extensions and a lot of tabs on my browsers. I'm going to get 16GB of RAM and i7. I'm not thinking those are essential right now. I want to ensure that 5 years down the road I won't be miserable like I am now.

Thank you for intelligently confirming my misgivings about RAID 0.

Quote:
Personally, I prefer software RAID
Please tell me more about that.

Somebody who advocated RAID 0 suggested that I get four 500mg hard drives in my desktop. Is there any advantage to that over two drives if I'm not going to do RAID 0?
conceptualclarity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03. Dec 2013, 11:23 AM   #30 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,741
Default

Hardware RAID is a combination of RAID hardware and firmware (software) either integrated into the motherboard of your PC or available through an expansion card.

Software RAID is simply software that requires no special hardware. Windows 8 includes a version called Storage Spaces. You can combine physical HDDs or partitions to make a larger drive. It's not as customizable as other software RAID but it is easy to setup. Here's a video that might be more helpful.
__________________
Better to light a candle ... than to curse the darkness.
Remah is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.