Search 80 Million Academic Papers For Free

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When you think about Microsoft's offerings in the internet search market you immediately think of Bing, its not-quite-as-good rival to Google. But Microsoft have other tricks up their search sleeve too, and one of those is the academic search facility.

Microsoft Academic is a search engine that indexes academic research papers. Unlike the typical article on the web, articles published in academic journals are meticulously researched, and then fact-checked by multiple experts. Whether you have a deep interest in a particular subject, or you just want to learn about things at a deeper level than the conventional web can provide, this material makes really interesting reading.

Microsoft's academic search system contains details of more than 80 million articles, and you can view abstract information about all of them.  Many are also available as full-text PDF files to download.  Others can be requested by email.  But whatever you want to study, it's a fair bet that you'll find some great information on this site.

Head to https://academic.microsoft.com/ to start what Microsoft calls the Search For Knowledge.

 

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Pubmed is where the professional scientists go: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed. It has all the scientific journals and papers you can think of but probably not so good on non-scientific things.
Keep up the good work!

I found about ten entries under the heading All History, and about half were Great Britain specific. Of the titles I clicked on, most allowed full access. I would not rule out Microsoft Academic in searching for information.

definitely doesn't appear anywhere good as Google Scholar -- difificult to do searches -- doesn't have as many options, those it has might be good for some topics, and for some types of searches, but not for others. Especially disappointing is the lack of any automated search utility for keeping up with the latest research. Can't see myself using it again.

Doing a quick comparison, I think google scholar looks better I would appreciate some other views. https://scholar.google.com.au/