Retrieve Videos From Your Web Browser Cache

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Nirsoft Video Cache ViewIf you've ever clicked on "delete offline content" in your web browser and paid attention to just how much disk space gets freed up, you'll know that browsers like to save local copies of almost everything you have viewed. Not just text pages and images, but entire videos too. Which can occasionally be somewhat awkward if you check the browser cache of someone who didn't realise that this goes on!

If you know where to find your browser's cache folder, you can retrieve any videos from there. Which means that you can re-watch something without the need to either download it or remember which site you found it on. You can also save a local copy in a more permanent location, once you realise that something you stumbled upon is actually worth keeping.

Video Cache View, from the always-excellent Nir Sofer, is the tool you need for exploring your video cache. Download it from http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/video_cache_view.html to get started. It's less than 1 MB to download and is malware-free according to VirusTotal and Web of Trust.

When you run it, the program will search all your browser cache locations (assuming you use any of the well-known browsers). You can then see a list of saved videos and choose what to do with them. And if you decide that you don't actually need any of them, you can then delete them all in order to free up loads of disk space.

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Comments

I thought this ceased to be useful around the time that HTML5 rose to prominence? Certainly, videos don't typically seem to pre-load like they used to.

I have been using this for years with Firefox with no problems. It took a bit of poking around to understand all that this can do, but it's a great little program!

I note that the description at the page cites at least one condition under which it will not work with Chrome.

Considering that Chrome is the basis for a number of browsers that are not CALLED "Chrome", this could be interesting