Learn How To Make Almost Anything At Instructables

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Instructables is an encyclopedia of interesting DIY projects with easy to follow step-by-step instructions and online classes.

Instructables is a place you can learn almost anything. It specializes in user-created and uploaded do-it-yourself projects that have clear step-by-step directions. The directions are text and photos, with video and downloadable PDF's on most projects.

I've used Instructables over the years to learn a variety of things. Projects are submitted by users (or you can create your own how-to and upload it) and rated by the community. It's a good alternative to sifting through YouTube videos. Some projects require certain skills, and if you don't have them, a project will often link to an Instructable that does. For example, the stained glass clock project links to a how to cut glass Instructable.
Anyone can view the projects, but if you want to take a class, ask a question, add a tip, post a comment, upload a project or join a contest you'll need to create a free account. You can log in with Facebook, Google, Twitter and Autodesk, or create an account using an email address.
Instructables is owned by Autodesk, creators of AutoCAD, among other things.

These are the main categories for projects, and you'll find a huge array of how-to's under every category.

  • Technology
  • Workshop
  • Craft
  • Home
  • Food
  • Play
  • Outside
  • Costumes

In addition to the main categories, there's Pier 9. It specializes in how-to skills such as Wood Shop, Metal Shop, CNC Shop and 3D Printshop with accompanying workshop tutorials. Go visit, you might find something you didn't know you wanted to make.

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Comments

The Gizmo and Instructables sites are at the top of my priority list to visit. You can be sure of accurate, good quality information from the former. Sadly my experience of Instructables is that the quality of the offerings varies from the 5% that are superb down to the utterly, dangerously outrageously wrong projects that lurk at the bottom of the tank. As with all things Web, viewer discretion is (strongly) advised especially anything from the Indian sub-continent that involves high voltages and sellotape insulation.

Example?

I agree, it's a good idea to evaluate the quality of any Instructable project. I've had good luck with all of mine but they didn't involve high voltages or insulation. :)

Thanks a lot. Looks to be a help compared to wading through the endless youtube DYIs. The good ones are well worth it, but sooo many.
Have settled on J-B Weld original (red & black separate squeeze-mix) compound for any plastic to plastic that will be subject to stresses.
Many glues like Gorilla don't fuse plastic to plastic if they are the rock hard, shiny surface kind. May look like there's a bond but first time you apply any stress, twist, impact they'll just re-separate. The compound can be worked for quite a while. Best given the full 24 hours to cure though is pretty rock hard after about 6 hrs air dry. Ends up black vs stated grey. Haven't used the 15 min fast set J-B that is red & yellow.

Yep there are many. :)
J-B Weld is a favorite around here too.

Will we be able to download those for producing 3D printed objects ?

The best site I have found for FREE and purchasing CAD files is here : https://www.myminifactory.com/