Gramps

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Gramps

A cross-platform and open-source application to research, organize and share your family tree with outstanding features.

5

Our rating: 

5
License: Free (Open source)
Categories: Home & Family, Genealogy
Tags: family-tree

Pros & Cons:

Cross platform and open source, easy navigation, outstanding place entry, superior date support, best narrative style web sites, create large format reports, support multiple parent relationships.
No foot or end notes, lacks people list, source list, repository list and citation list reports.

Our Review:

Gramps should be able to run on any operating systems that supports Python, e.g. Windows, Linux, Mac OS (disclaimer--I only tested in Windows). Easily navigate or filter by people or name list, family, relationship, ancestry, events, places, sources, repositories, media, and notes. An undo function allows easy correction of the most recent entries.

The place entry is especially outstanding. Places have distinct fields for street, city, latitude, church parish, etc. Alternate locations can be entered for each place, e.g. one could enter Virginia as an alternate for some West Virginia locations prior to the Civil War. Sources, notes, multimedia, and internet links can be linked to each place. Also all events linked to the place are displayed and can be navigated to.

The date support is superior. Dates can be based on several different calendars, e.g. Gregorian, Islamic, etc. The date can have a quality of regular, estimated, or calculated. And finally the type can include before, after, range, span, etc. Events support roles, e.g. bride for a marriage event. Oddly there is no date calculator so, for example, a birth date calculated from the age at death would need to be manually calculated.

Gramps creates the best narrative style web sites. You can select a standard copyright or from any of the Creative Commons copyrights. Not only can living people be excluded, entirely or name only but also a date range to restrict recently deceased people can be selected, e.g. people who died within the last five years could be treated as if they were still living.

Gramps can create large format reports which could be sent to a facility with the ability to print large sheets. Alternatively, large sized reports can be printed on individual pages which can be put together like a jigsaw puzzle, with the pages numbered according to their location in the overall report.

Sources can be attached to people, families, events, and multimedia. Citations can be copied and pasted.

Gramps directly supports patronymic and matronymic style names, e.g. ap Robert, verch Evan, etc. It also supports multiple surnames, e.g. Ramón y Cajal.

Gramps supports multiple parent relationships, e.g. adoptive. Same sex marriage is supported and each partner is labelled as "spouse." Same sex parents are also supported but one parent will be labelled as father and the other as mother. Marriage is not assumed for parents. Gender need not be specified for parents or married couples, e.g. a marriage can be entered for J. Roe and A. Smith with both listed as unknown gender. Genealogists worried about how to enter the parents of cloned individuals will be relieved to know that the same person can be entered as both father and mother:)

Gramps supports the utf-8 character set.

On the downside, the family group text report did not have foot or end notes. It lacks people list, source list, repository list, and citation list reports.

The portable version is available here.


Gramps was reviewed by on

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Comments

I have been keeping my Family Tree in an OLD program whose executable is FTW.exe. The files have the extension ".ftw." I would like to find an app for my iphone that will either access the .ftw file (in Dropbox) or import the information from the .ftw file. I would like an app that has versions for both Windows 7 Pro PC and iPhone 7s so that I can synchronize them using Dropbox. Am I whistling in the dark? (I am 75 years old and once was considered "computer savvy"; but I have not been able to keep up with the rapid advancements in technology -- I am an old DOS gal.) Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated.