Forget Windows 10. Try Out Windows 1.01 Instead!

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Microsoft first shipped Windows 1.0 in 1985.  When the finished version of Windows 10 ships in 2015, the operating system will be 30 years old.  That's a lifetime (indeed many lifetimes) in the world of computing.  If you want to experience for yourself just how primitive Windows v1 was, you can.  And there's no need to shell out for an original IBM PC, as you can do it all from within a virtual retro PC directly in your web browser.

To get started, head to http://www.pcjs.org/configs/pc/machines and choose a machine from the list on offer.  Most of them are just running MS-DOS, but you'll see 2 that are listed as running Windows 1.01.  Start up the machine, switch to the C: drive by typing C: at the prompt, then switch to the Windows directory by typing CD WINDOWS and pressing Return.  Then type WIN and you'll be running Windows 1 in a virtual IBM PC.  

The more you play with these old PCs, both in MS-DOS and Windows modes, the more you realise just how far we've come in the past 2 or 3 decades.  Which makes you wonder just where we'll be in 2 or 3 more.

 

 

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Comments

I liked that old clock.exe program.

No caps lock, so you can't get the : to work. That's OK, I've seen enough! (shudder)

Your first advice is good though: "Forget Windows Ten"! I'm on Linux and I'm not looking back.

What a great pity that Digital Research decided to drop its graphical operating system GEM - this was far better than Windows was at the time.

If DR had continued their support, we would all be using GEM now and Windows would have been dropped like the pile of rubbish which it is.

How do you lock the shift key? I can't get a : to enter.

I have the same problem described by discipline.
What is the solution?

Peter

Thanks Rob.
An emotive trip to our past!

Peter

I still remember my friend's shriek of horror followed by a torrent of swearing after she typed:

FORMAT C:

Bless Bill Gates for saving us from our own inability to remember and use simple MS-DOS and PC-DOS commands. Not to mention all of those pesky shortcuts in programs running on same.

Windows. Our protector. Pfft.