gizmo richards' support alert newsletter

"Gizmo's top picks of the best
tech resources and utilities"

 Free Edition
Issue 155, 20th March, 2008

If you have problems reading this newsletter in your email program you can read it online in your browser at http://techsupportalert.com/issues/al_current.htm

IN THIS FREE EDITION:

0. EDITORIAL: A PC That Cannot Became Infected with Malware


1. TOP TECH SITES AND RESOURCES
1.1 Gizmo Needs Your Help
1.2 Outstanding List of Free Tools
1.3 Find out Where any Telephone Number is Physically Located
1.4 How to Remove the Arrow in Shortcut Icons
1.5 Simple Web Filtering
1.6 Free Picasa Add-ons
1.7 Ten Killer Firefox Extensions (Premium Edition)
1.8 Online Service Converts Bitmap Images to Vector Graphics (Premium)
1.9 How to Copy DVDs Using Freeware (Premium Edition)
2. TOP FREEWARE AND SHAREWARE UTILITIES
2.1 Free Easy-to-Use Video Editor
2.2 Text-To-Voice Utilities
2.3 Which is the Best Desktop of Them All?
2.4 Free PDA Fits in Any Pocket
2.5 Free Web Service Arranges Meetings Automatically
2.6 How to Protect Your PC from Security Threats (Premium Edition)
2.7 Another Outstanding Free Program Launcher (Premium Edition)
2.8 Automate Tasks in Firefox and Internet Explorer (Premium Edition)
3. SECURITY PATCHES, SERVICE RELEASES AND UPDATES
3.1 Microsoft Security News
3.2 Malware Disguised as Freeware
3.3 Spammers Defeat GMail
3.4 You Have More Investment in Online Data than you Think
3.5 Alternative to AutoPatcher for Updating XP SP2
3.6 Is your ISP Selling Your Browsing History?
4. OTHER USEFUL STUFF
4.1 USB Flash Drives Get even Cheaper
4.2 Use Google Sky from Your Browser
4.3 What Extension is That?
4.4 Free Alternatives to Expensive Software
4.5 Useless Waste of Time Department
4.6 The Top 10 Web Sites you've Never Heard Of (Premium Edition)
4.7 Share PC Games and Applications (Premium Edition)
4.8 Which Movie Download Site Is Best? (Premium Edition)
5. TIP OF THE MONTH
5.1 How to Record Streaming Media
6. FREEBIE OF THE MONTH
6.1 How to Tell You if You Are Secretly Connected to the Internet
6.2 No Windows XP Setup Disk? Here's How to Create One (Premium)
7. MANAGING YOUR SUBSCRIPTION
0.0 EDITORIAL

I don't normally review hardware but I could hardly wait to get my hands on the IMGolden PC that the manufacturer claimed was immune to malware infection. The "manufacturer" is actually a Support Alert Subscriber, Bob Schweighauser who, together with some of his colleagues, designs and makes the machines. Here's what Bob wrote when out of the blue, he first contacted me:

"Gizmo your hard work has helped me tremendously. You inspired my friend and I to build a new kind of PC, in which we now have a U.S. provisional patent, that...I am going to make an incredibly bold statement right now...is impervious to all viruses, trojans, spyware -all malware in fact.

We call it a PI Client. PI stands for Preserved Integrity. It's the same PC every time you turn it on. It will never slow down, there's no updating and requires no maintenance.  The machine itself is named the IMGolden PC. IM stands for Internet Machine and Golden means a user has no worries.

About a year and a half ago or so, you introduced me to Live Linux CDs as a fool-proof way of avoiding having one's PC compromised. Specifically, the Ubuntu distro. I love the fact that the hard drive isn't used at all...everything just goes to memory. No worries whatsoever! This is the idea the PC is based upon...with a few differences."

By now you should get the idea: the IMGolden PC is a Linux Based PC with no hard drive. When you start it up it boots a version of Ubuntu Linux that's stored in a non-volatile memory module. It's kind of like running Ubuntu from a Live CD except that the Live CD is actually in permanent memory. As is the case with a Live CD, there are a whole bunch of programs pre-installed and ready to use, including Open Office and Firefox.

It's a clever idea with some immediate advantages. Every time you boot the PC it comes up in exactly the same state as the last time you booted it. Indeed, in exactly the same state it left the factory. And of course the operating system running from memory is much faster than running from a CD.

As there is no hard disk, there is nowhere for malware to hide. Any infection resident in normal memory (RAM) is destroyed when you power the machine off.

I know what you are thinking. "If this thing returns to the same state each time I boot it, then how can I save any of my work?"

You can't. Well, not on the IMGolden PC anyway. You can, however, save your data to a USB flash drive or write it to a CD or DVD.

But that's not the best way of saving your data.

Far better is to save it to a website. In fact, that's the ideal way to use the machine. Instead of using the applications installed on the PC (such as Open Office), do all your work online using free web services like Google Apps and save all your documents and data to the web service.

It's totally practical. You could use Gmail for your email, Google Apps for documents and spreadsheets, Flickr for your digital photos etc. Indeed, there are now free web services for digital editing, instant messaging and just about any other desktop application you can name. And you don't even have to worry about backup!

I've felt for some time that web applications are the future of computing. Of course you don't need a PC like the IMGolden in order to use web based applications; you can use any PC or device with a web browser. However, the IMGolden PC will, out of necessity, encourage you to move in that direction and that's not a bad thing.

After using the IMGolden PC for a few days I was sorry to see it go. It, together with web based applications, introduced a kind of simplicity to computing that was a breath of fresh air. No worries about security, software updates, defragging, registry cleaning, backup and all the other usual PC hassles. It allowed me to simply use the computer to do what I wanted to do without any of the usual distractions.

On the downside the IMGolden PC is built into a standard PC case which strikes me as unnecessarily large. The Ubuntu Linux Desktop may also be confronting for some users even though it looks very similar to a Windows XP desktop. Still, all most users will need to do is double click the Firefox icon; from then on they are in familiar territory.

And is this the machine totally immune to infection? In theory no. The machine could become infected while you are actually using it, for example by visiting a hostile website that exploited a Firefox vulnerability. The machine would remain infected until the next reboot and in the interim that infection could result in confidential information being transmitted to a remote attacker. And of course if you leave a USB flash drive plugged in, that could be used to transmit an infection even after rebooting.

However, we are talking very low risk possibilities. I'm not aware of any Firefox vulnerability involving code injection that works in a Linux environment. Similarly, malware infections that propagate using a flash drive are rare in Windows setups let alone Linux.

No, I think it's fair that in practice the probability of the IMGolden PC becoming infected is low enough that you could safely ignore it.

But I have one final reservation and an important one at that: The idea behind the IMGolden PC only works well if you are prepared to use web based applications. If you are not yet prepared to make that leap then using a diskless PC like this is likely to be a very frustrating experience.

There are various "thin client" PCs around that claim to provide similar functionality to the IMGolden PC. How they compare I cannot say. What I can say is the IMGolden PC did exactly what it was supposed to do without any problems and that is all you can ask for.

All reservations aside, this is a very clever idea that's well implemented. It reinforces what I have long known: you subscribers are a clever lot.

See you next month.

Gizmo
editor@techsupportalert.com

Disclaimer: I did not get paid to review this product nor did I receive any other benefit, direct or indirect, from the developer. As is my normal practice, the review product was returned to the vendor after testing.

PS If you want some more details about this product please contact subscriber Bob Schweighauser directly at bob@imgoldenpc.com.

PPS This month I'm giving away six free copies of the top rated anti-virus NOD32. For details, see below.

Support Alert is not produced by a giant publishing empire, it's the work of one man, working alone, namely me.

Support Alert relies on paid subscriptions to the Premium Edition to survive. If you feel that you've benefited from reading the free edition perhaps you would like to consider subscribing to the Premium.

The Premium Edition contains almost twice the number of great tech sites, free utilities, tips and other content as the free edition. It's also ad-free.

When you subscribe you'll also get immediate access to the archive of all past issues of the Premium Edition where you can catch up on the hundreds of great utilities you missed in the free edition. If you like the free edition you'll love the premium. At $10 per year it's just the cost of a few coffees.

This month I'm giving away to new Premium subscribers, six free copies of the top rated anti-virus NOD32.

NOD32 is a brilliant program for protecting your PC yet it only consumes a modest amount of your computing resources. That's why I use it on my key work computers. At $39 it's good value but it's even better value when you can get it for free.

The six copies I'm giving away will be allocated at random but your chances of scoring one are actually quite good. So if you have been thinking of subscribing, now's the time. Note this offer is only valid in jurisdictions that permit such offers.

Even if you don't win anything you'll still get my special report "Gizmo's Desert Island Utilities" which outlines the software I use myself, including many free products.

How to subscribe to the Premium Edition: 12 months subscription to the Premium Edition costs $10 which can be made by credit card, PayPal or eCheck. Use the link below to subscribe now:

http://www.techsupportalert.com/se-edition.htm


1.0 TOP TECH SITES AND RESOURCES

1.1 Gizmo Needs Your Help

About 18 months back I ran a contest for a new name for my website and this newsletter. The winner was "GizmoGold.com."

Within a week of announcing the winner I received a threatening legal letter from another publication that also used "Gizmo" in its name claiming they would sue me if I used the name "GizmoGold." Now I don't mind a fight but there is no way a one-man-band like me can take on a big corporation without doing serious harm to my business and finances. So I put the idea on hold.

Then about a year ago a subscriber wrote in and suggested another name for the site: "46best.com." The idea grabbed me. It was short, it was memorable and keyed into the fact that most people visit my site for the "46 Best-ever Freeware" list. And most importantly, it didn't have "Gizmo" in the name.

So here is where I need your help. I am seriously thinking of changing the name of www.techsupportalert.com to www.46best.com. If you like the idea just click the first link [1] below while connected to the internet. If you don't like it, click the second link [2]. Thanks - Gizmo.

[1] http://www.techsupportalert.com/i-like-it.htm
[2] http://www.techsupportalert.com/it-sucks.htm

1.2 Outstanding List of Free Tools
I hadn't visited Nir Sofer's website [1] for a while and was surprised just how many new freebies he has added. You really must check this out; I can't imagine any techy or experienced user coming away empty handed. Make sure you also check out the "utilities" page [2].
[1] http://www.nirsoft.net
[2] http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/index.html

1.3 Find out Where any Telephone Number is Physically Located
This free service works for numbers worldwide. Thanks to subscriber Afridy Zaaman for the suggestion.
http://www.tp2location.com/

1.4 How to Remove the Arrow in Shortcut Icons
In Windows, shortcut icons have a little curly black arrow in the lower left hand corner. The arrow is there to indicate that the icon is a shortcut or pointer to a file or folder rather than the file or folder itself. That makes perfect sense to me but not to a lot of folks who seem hell-bent on removing the arrow. There are lots of techniques, but using the free Tweak UI program is possibly the easiest. Full instructions here:
http://windowsxp.mvps.org/arrow.htm

1.5 Simple Web Filtering
Subscriber "Bernie" writes, "Gizmo I'm the network manager in a school and as such I have the onerous task of having to filter internet content for students. The best way I've found so far for doing this is a service called OpenDNS. OpenDNS simply gives you two replacement DNS servers to put into your router and then all requests go through them. They have made a great addition to this by allowing you to filter by category." Thanks Bernie. OpenDNS is great for simple filtering but it also has some other useful features such as preventing access to phishing sites and even correcting your spelling. On the other hand, expect to see advertisements every time you connect to a dead site, and you may also find performance issues. There have also been problems with some VPNs.
http://www.opendns.com/

1.6 Free Picasa Add-ons
Subscriber Paul Lawrence writes, "Gizmo, Google's Picasa is definitely a good photo organizer, and it can create some pretty nice galleries of your photos for use on the web. I ran across a website that offers 17 free very nice flash and html gallery templates for use with Picasa. There is also a demo of each on the site so you can see how great they look before you download them."
http://www.paulvanroekel.nl/picasa/index.asp

** These items appear only in the Premium Edition **

1.7 Ten Killer Firefox Extensions

1.8 Online Service Converts Bitmap Images to Vector Graphics

1.9 How to Copy DVDs Using Freeware

Got some great tech sites to suggest? Send them to: editor@techsupportalert.com


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2.0 TOP FREEWARE AND SHAREWARE UTILITIES
 

2.1 Free Easy-to-Use Video Editor

Paul Lawrence, one the volunteer category editors for the "Best-ever Freeware" Wiki project, recently sent me this email:

 "Gizmo, quality freeware video editors are hard to come by. Most are overly complicated, and hard to use, unstable, or lack a good set of features. VideoSpin (freeware) is a new software package created by Pinnacle Systems, the makers of the very popular Pinnacle Studio. It is very easy to use, has a slick well organized interface, a good set of transitions, a title creator, and other nice features. It creates video in several popular formats including .flv so you can upload your videos directly to the web."

Nice find Paul, but I have some reservations: First up, this is a big download - 149MB with all the Codecs. Second, it wouldn't install on my test PC - the installation just hung. Yet on another of my PCs it installed without problem. Third, the Codecs are not free, they are only provided on a 15 day trial basis.

But you are quite right; it is very easy to use and that is a real plus. I'm no video dude but I managed to edit two short videos a relative had sent me without even reading the manual. In fact, I'd rate VideoSpin as the most user friendly freeware video editor I've used.

However if you mainly process AVI files then you should also check out VirtualDub [2]. It's not quite as easy to use but it's free, has video capture and has a more established user base.

VideoSpin: Freeware, Windows XP, Vista, 2.3MB, 149MB with Codec pack.

[1] http://videospin.com/
[2] http://www.virtualdub.org/

2.2 Text-To-Voice Utilities

Wouldn't it be nice if you could press a button and have all the new email in your in-box read to you in a pleasant human sounding voice while you were doing other work? And wouldn't it be nice if I could tell you a free program that does just that?

 Well, I'm sorry, I can't.

Yes, there are a few free text-to-speech utilities available but they are quite basic in their interface and outright crude when it comes to voice quality. That's because the really hard part in producing a good text-to-voice program is the voice and the best "voices" are commercial products. Most of the free text-to-voice programs use free voices such as those from Microsoft and these sound distinctly robotic.

However, if you are prepared to tolerate this you can get good results with the freeware text-to-voice program Speakonia [1]. It comes with about 20 voices and will either read text aloud to you in real time or record the spoken results to a .WAV file for later replay. It uses the Microsoft voices which I would describe as "clear but annoying" unless, that is, you actually enjoy listening to Robots. The user interface is simple but not particularly convenient; it plays any text you've copied to the Clipboard.

If you can afford to buy a commercial product, then TextAloud is my top pick. At $29.95 it's reasonably priced, though you'll almost certainly want to purchase a commercial voice, such as one of the impressive AT&T "Natural Voices," as well. That will set you back another 35 bucks and 600MB of disk space.

With the use of one of these commercial voices, the spoken quality from TextAloud is surprisingly good and much better than Speakonia. Indeed, it exceeded my expectations. TextAloud also has a much better interface than Speakonia. It will read directly from Word, PDF, and HTML files and has plug-ins for Internet Explorer, Firefox, and Outlook. It can also record directly to either MP3 or WMA audio files.

So if you really want your email read to you then this is the sort of money you are going to have to pay. Thanks to subscriber "WILTON" for the suggestion.

[1] http://www.cfs-technologies.com/home/?id=1.4 Freeware, all Windows versions, 2.6MB.
[2] http://www.nextup.com/TextAloud/index.html Shareware, 20 day trial, Windows 98-Vista, 3.1MB.

2.3 Which is the Best Desktop of Them All?
It's a case of "Mirror, Mirror on the Wall" when regular contributor "Briard" looks at Microsoft Vista, Apple Leopard and Ubuntu Linux to decide which operating system provides the best user experience. This is a long, well researched article but Briard's light and breezy style makes it a delight to read. Highly recommended.
http://www.techsupportalert.com/battle-for-the-desktop.htm

2.4 Free PDA Fits in Any Pocket
I mentioned this way back in #125, but I was recently reminded, by subscriber Caroline Begbie, just what a great product it is. Here's what I said then: "Some of the smartest people I know don't use a PDA but instead carry around in their shirt pocket little pieces of paper that contain just the information they need. This free web service uses Flash to create an 8 page paper PDA customized to your needs. Brilliant."
http://www.pocketmod.com/

2.5 Free Web Service Arranges Meetings Automatically
Anyone who has tried to schedule a meeting at a time convenient to all the participants knows what a hassle this can be. TimeBridge is a free web service that does the work for you. All you do is type in the participant's email addresses and a set of possible times, and TimeBridge does all the rest. To make things even easier, it integrates with your Outlook Contacts and Calendar or, indeed, any iCal based calendar including Google. Registration is required. Thanks to subscriber Douglas Baumwall for the suggestion.
http://www.timebridge.com

** These items appear only in the Premium Edition **

2.6 How to Protect Your PC from Security Threats

2.7 Another Outstanding Free Program Launcher

2.8 Automate Tasks in Firefox and Internet Explorer

Got some top utilities to suggest? Send them to
editor@techsupportalert.com


3.0 SECURITY PATCHES, SERVICE RELEASES AND UPDATES

3.1 Microsoft Security News

The Microsoft "Patch Tuesday" in March resulted in the release of four security bulletins each of which was rated "critical by Microsoft." The bulletins covered in total seven flaws in Microsoft Excel including patches for a number of exploits that were in active circulation.

If you are thinking that the problems with Excel are all now fixed then think again. According to security organization Secunia [1] there are still multiple vulnerabilities in Excel including some confirmed by Microsoft as being in active circulation.

Until Microsoft gets around to patching all known flaws, users should not open Excel files from unknown sources or, alternatively, they should open such files in a sandbox or other safe environment.

Further details of the Microsoft March updates can be found here [2]. All of the updates are distributed automatically via the Microsoft Update Service. Dial-up users in particular need to be aware that these updates are large files and will require a considerable period of time online to be successfully downloaded. If you are not certain that you have received the updates then visit the Microsoft Update Service [3] now.

[1] http://secunia.com/advisories/28506/
[2] http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/bulletin/ms08-mar.mspx
[3] http://update.microsoft.com (Requires IE5 or later)

3.2 Malware Disguised as Freeware
Subscribers to this newsletter know I love freeware. They also know that I advise users to only download freeware from trusted sites such as download.com and majorgeeks.com, or from sites recommended by trusted sources. This article, sent to me by regular contributor JW, illustrates some of the dangers. The author downloaded a freeware Gmail accessory only to discover that the program emailed his Gmail username and password to the author. Read the gory details here:
http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/001072.html

3.3 Spammers Defeat GMail
It looks like the bad guys have found a way to defeat the CAPTCHA graphics verification system used by Google. Google uses that system to ensure new Gmail accounts are created by real people, not spambots. Expect to see more spam originating from Gmail accounts. Thanks to subscriber Geoffrey Brown for the link.
http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,143270/article.html?tk=nl_dnxnws

3.4 You Have More Investment in Online Data than you Think
This article, called "When the Internet Is My Hard Drive, Should I Trust Third Parties?" raises some very important questions about the information you have chosen to store on the internet. And we are not just talking about online data backup here. The author certainly got me thinking about just how much data I have online and I how much I have come to depend on it. A valuable and thought provoking article. Thanks to JW for this one.
http://www.wired.com/print/politics/security/commentary/securitymatters/2008/02/securitymatters_0221

3.5 Alternative to AutoPatcher for Updating XP SP2
Here's another way of updating Windows XP with all those post-SP2 Windows patches: RyanVM's Windows XP Post-SP2 Update Pack. It's a downloadable file of 52.7MB that includes all patches up to March 2, 2008. To install the patches you'll also need to download the RyanVM Integrator program. Thanks to subscriber AJ Averett for the link.
http://www.ryanvm.net/msfn/updatepack-sp2.html

3.6 Is your ISP Selling Your Browsing History?
According to this report "three of the UK's top ISPs (Virgin Media, BT and TalkTalk) have decided to sell your private browsing history to an advertising broker. Yes, the entire list of every web page you visit gets sent to Phorm (the broker) in real time, as you click, so they can send you targeted advertising." Even more disturbing is the fact that the ISPs customers are not even being told about what is happening. And the problem is not only in the UK - it appears Phorn is in discussion with US ISP's as well! Better ask your ISP if they have a relationship with Phorn. If so, I suggest it's time to change ISPs or start using Tor, a VPN or other anonymizing technique. Thanks to subscriber "Paul" for the link.
http://www.badphorm.co.uk/page.php?2
 

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4.0 OTHER USEFUL STUFF

4.1 USB Flash Drives Get even Cheaper
In issue #153 I mentioned Buy.com had 2GB Kingston Traveler USB Flash drives for $19.95 and joked that prices were dropping so quickly that you would soon be getting flash drives free with your Corn Flakes. Well, it's not far away. I noticed today that CTCStore.com [1] now has the same Kingston drives for $12.95 and if you buy two you get free shipping. A free premium subscription for the first subscriber to report a 2GB Kingston Traveler drive under $10 including shipping. A free lifetime subscription for the first subscriber who actually gets one in his/her breakfast cereal packet ;>)
[1] http://www.ctcstore.com/Kingston-DTI2GBKR-Data-Traveler-2-GB/M/B000FZX9I0.htm

4.2 Use Google Sky from Your Browser
Now there's no need to download and install Google Earth Software in order to use Google Sky because you can now run it directly from your browser. There are many things of great beauty, wonder and mystery to see here. Check out the Hubble Showcase; only a sad and miserable soul could not be moved by these glorious photos.
http://www.google.com/sky/

4.3 What Extension is That?
You know the story; someone sends you a file with a strange extension like .MOD and you can't open it. At this free site they will tell you what kind of file it is and, hopefully, what program you need to open it. There are several sites like this, including some that are more comprehensive in their coverage, but what I liked about this one is that it covers files from Mac and Linux as well as Windows, and has provision for user comments, some of which are more informative than the site information itself.
http://www.dotwhat.net

4.4 Free Alternatives to Expensive Software
I've mentioned this site [1] before that lists Open Source alternatives to popular commercial programs, but here's another site [2], suggested by subscriber Yoel Polsky, that does the same thing a different way. A most useful resource.
[1] http://whdb.com/2008/the-top-50-proprietary-programs-that-drive-you-crazy-and-their-open-source-alternatives/
[2] http://www.osalt.com/

4.5 Useless Waste of Time Department
At this site [1] you'll find some stunning photographs of aviation accidents that took place on the ground! I liked the photo of the light plane chopped up by another plane's propellers. If you have a fear of flying I suggest you give this item a miss and, instead, head over to the less distressing diversions at this site [2]. Thanks to subscribers Lex Davidson and Gavin Downhams for the links.
[1] http://www.darkroastedblend.com/2007/11/airplane-oops-situations.html
[2] http://www.albinoblacksheep.com/games/bloxorz

** These items appear only in the Premium SE Edition **

4.6 The Top 10 Web Sites You've Never Heard Of

4.7 Share PC Games and Applications between Other PCs, PS3s, Linux Boxes

4.8 Which Movie Download Site Is Best?


5.0 TIP OF THE MONTH

5.1 How to Record Streaming Media

This is one of most common questions I get from subscribers. It's also one of the most difficult to answer as there are serious legal issues involved.

So serious that many of the free software products designed to capture streaming media have been hounded off the web by copyright owners and their henchmen. I keep a short list of these programs on my website [1] but it's difficult to keep up-to-date as the download sites are always going offline.

And it's not only the legal issues; there are other complications: There is the associated problem of DRM protection not to mention the difficulties in dealing with many different streaming media formats and their associated codecs.

My advice for cutting through this maze is simple and pragmatic: If possible, use a free web service to record the streaming media, and, if that fails, simply record the streaming media while it is playing on your PC.

If you just want to do something simple like record a YouTube video, then sites like ZamZar [2], SplanDoo [3] and YouConvertIt [4] will do the job for you. Just plug in the address of the stream and select the format you want and you are finished. Depending on which site you've chosen, either a download link will be emailed to you or you will be able to download the captured file directly from the site.

Unfortunately, this simple approach will not work for many streams. In this situation I suggest you simply play the media stream on your PC and record what's happening on the screen and coming out your speakers.

Sure, there is some quality loss, but the great advantage of this approach is that it completely bypasses the whole question of DRM protection; if you can play it on your PC then you can record it from your PC. And you can record it in a form that is free of any protection and can therefore be replayed through any device that supports the appropriate file format.

For video streams there are several free session recorders that will do the recording job. You can find a good list of candidates on my website here [5]. These products are really designed for preparing on-screen tutorials and similar tasks, but several are capable of recording video replays.

Krut [6] in particular works well, though it can only output files in .MOV and .WAV formats. However, the output files can readily be converted to other formats using free conversion sites like ZamZar [2] and YouConvertIt [4].
There are some traps with Krut, particularly with video card and sound card settings, so I strongly suggest that you read this excellent tutorial [7].

My personal freeware favorite for on-screen capture is CamStudio V2 [8], because the output is in the more widely used .AVI and .FLV formats. It too has issues with video and sound cards, so you had better read the Krut tutorial [7] for guidance on this issue. The same solutions suggested for Krut are also applicable to CamStudio.

Just as you can record streaming videos playing on your PC, you can also record audio streams playing through your PC speakers. In fact, there are a number of free programs designed specifically for this task. My favorite is MP3myMP3 [9] which records directly from your sound card output. A slightly more complex alternative is to use the record option which is available in the Audacity Audio Editor [10], but this is probably overkill for average users who would be best off with the simplicity of MP3myMP3.

All these solution bypass the format problems and DRM protection issues. They don't, however, bypass the legal issues. I'm not going to preach to you on this matter; instead I trust in your good judgment.

[1] http://techsupportalert.com/more/extended.htm#91
[2] http://www.zamzar.com/url/
[3] http://splandoo.com/
[4] http://youconvertit.com/OnlineVideo.aspx
[5] http://techsupportalert.com/more/extended.htm#105
[6] http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=129468
[7] http://www.freewaregenius.com/2007/04/13/krut-computer-recorder/
[8] http://camstudio.org/
[9] http://www.mp3mymp3.com/mp3_my_mp3_recorder.html
[10] http://audacity.sourceforge.net/


6.0 FREEBIE OF THE MONTH

6.1 How to Tell if You Are Secretly Connected to the Internet

(This item is an update to an article that first appeared in the October 2005 issue of this newsletter)

One of the most unnerving computer experiences is to notice sudden unexpected internet activity from your PC when you're not using the internet at the time.

It can be brought to your attention several ways. For example, the lights on your modem or router might start blinking furiously, or your firewall may indicate internet activity, or your download/upload monitor could show that a lot of information is being received or transmitted.

When this happens to me, the first thought that goes through my mind is that a malware program may be "phoning home" to some remote PC, divulging all my personal information.

Now I know this is unlikely because my PC is well protected, but I know enough about security to know that it's possible. So whenever this happens I immediately investigate what's happening, and you should do the same. In the following paragraphs I'll show you how.

When you are connected to the internet you are not connected at one point but at multiple points. These different points are called ports. Data can flow into and out of each of these ports. It's a bit like the way flies get into your house. They can get in (or out) through the front door, the back door, the windows or the chimney. These openings in your house are just like the ports in your computer.

There can be up to 65000 ports on your computer, but normally these are shut. When you start a program such as your web browser that connects to the internet, that program opens one or more ports to make the connection.
So when your computer shows signs of unexpected internet activity, you need to determine what ports are open and then identify the programs that opened those ports.

There's a whole class of utilities called "port enumerators" that will do this job for you. In fact, there are more than a dozen such programs currently available. Additionally, many firewalls and anti-trojan programs have in-built port enumerators, though these are often quite basic.

I've looked at most of these products and found one freeware product that is outstanding. It's a tiny 50KB program that doesn't require installation, called CurrPorts [1] from Nir Sofer over at Nirsoft. It works best with Windows NT and later, though Windows 98 users can still use the product with less information displayed.

CurrPorts, like all port enumerators, shows all the ports that are currently open on your PC. It also shows you the process that opened each port and the time the port was opened. Most importantly, it flags, in pink, any suspicious ports.
Now "suspicious" here just means worth checking. However, this flagging makes the job of interpreting results much easier for less experienced users.

And if you install CurrPorts sister program from Nirsoft called IPNetInfo [2], you can right click on a suspicious connection and track down the location and owner of the remote site. If it's somewhere like North Korea, China or Romania, you almost certainly have a problem.

If you do have a problem CurrPorts allows you to immediately shut down that port. That reduces the potential damage but of course doesn't solve the problem. To do that you need to find the malware program responsible.
How you do that is, unfortunately, beyond the scope of this article. As a quick guide I suggest you download HijackThis from this link http://www.tomcoyote.org/hjt/ and follow the instructions on the same page how to paste the output to the Tom Coyote web forums. The folks on the forum should be able to help you permanently get rid of the problem and it won't cost you a cent either.

So folks, download CurrPorts now so that the next time you have unexplained internet activity you'll know exactly what to do about it.

[1] CurrPorts:
http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/cports.html
Freeware, Windows NT->Vista plus Win 98 with some limitations, No installation required, 50KB.

[2] IPNetInfo:
http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/ipnetinfo.html
Freeware, Windows 98->Vista, No installation required, 48KB.

*** Bonus Freebie in the Premium Edition ***

6.2 No Windows XP Setup Disk? Here's How to Create One

Many PCs don't come with a full bootable Windows Setup CD. Instead they come with a "Recovery CD" or, worse still, no CD but a special recovery partition on the hard drive. In most cases running the recovery CD or hard drive program will take the PC back to its original state.

That's all very well for the PC vendors, but it's a bad deal for consumers. Often, users want to re-install Windows without reverting the PC to its original state. Similarly, they may want to move their copy of Windows to another PC or engage in a task that requires a Windows Setup CD, such as building a Bart PE Boot Disk. That's why it's always useful to have a full Windows Setup CD for your PC.

But there is some good news: with Windows XP it's usually possible to create a Windows Setup CD from the PC Vendor's Recovery CD or from files on your hard drive...

Full details in the Premium Edition.

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See you next issue. It will be published on Thursday 17th of April, 2008.

Gizmo
Ian Richards
editor@techsupportalert.com