A Free Password Manager that's Just as Good as Roboform

I never thought I'd see it happen; a free password manager as good as Roboform and maybe even better.

Unlike Roboform which is a utility that runs on your PC, LastPass uses a web service that works in combination with a program that runs on your PC.

It's a smart approach: 

The webservice means your passwords are accessible from different computers: PCs, Macs or Linux boxes.

The stand-alone program that runs on your computer means that you can access and use your passwords even when you are offline.

But the thing I like best about LastPass is that, just like Robboform, it automatically fills in login forms as soon as you visit a website. This makes it quite different from other password managers that merely store your login information and require you to copy and paste your credentials.

And LastPass stores more than usernames and passwords, it also stores webform infomation, in a similar manner to Roboform's Passcards.  It also securely stores your notes.

The security and privacy of your infomation is protected by strong 256 bit AES encryption. Furthermore your encryption key and master password never leave your computer so not even the folks at LastPass can read your data.

Plugins are available for both Internet Explorer and Firefox so it will not only work on Windows systems but Mac and Linux systems running Firefox.

Some other features:

  • Portable version available
  • Can import information from most other password managers including RoboForm
  • Can import IE and Firefox passwords
  • Has a useful "Favorites" list
  • Partial iPhone integration
  • Support planned for Safari and Chrome (but not Opera)

All up, a lot to like here.  Goes straight to the top of my list as the best free password manager.

https://lastpass.com/

Gizmo

 

 

 

 

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Comments

by Patrick L (not verified) on 21. January 2011 - 23:13  (64974)

Ever try to use the phone number that they provide for tech support? What a joke. You either leave a phone number on their answering machine that they never return your call or, "Sorry, we are unavailable at this time. Call later.".

Their email support? A different answer every time for the same problem.

Their "free" upgrades? They just start charging for a new release whenever they seem to need more money - no rhyme or reason. And no upgrade price! You pay the same as new users do. What's up with that?

by todd (not verified) on 15. November 2010 - 20:43  (61258)

I purchased roboform and used it for about 3 months, I find their customer service terrible and i have lately had several drive problems that made me have to reinstall my OS, I was forced to reactivate roboform a email joke back and forth I gave up ans use LASTPASS, It's FREE and way easier.

by fedup (not verified) on 23. October 2010 - 2:41  (59971)

1- If your goal is privacy online, and you use VPN or IP changers, you would be defeating yourself to leave a PERMANENT record in ONE place of all your locations on different VPN and IP. This would happen if you constantly access your passwords ONLINE saved at one location.

2- If you have cyberstalkers, and your browser leaks when a VPN goes down, and they find your password location online, you are as good as screwed.

3- Please make a good-as-roboform password filler that does NOT hang googly-critters in my face off my browser bar, but SITS IN THE SYSTEM TRAY and quietly manages my logins from there. It would be more professional, less intrusive, and not hog my browser window on my tiny laptop.

by Anonymous on 17. February 2010 - 22:19  (43842)

Here is a real life scenario that Lastpass can do that no others that I know of can... I have tested a lot of password managers including PassPack and roboform.. etc.

I am a small business owner with 20 employees. I have a lot of very sensitive website logins that I share with some but not others. I want to share login with some employees without them actually know or see the passwords.

-lastpass allows me to share the passwords with individual employees securely and they will never actually know what the password is.
-I can revoke access anytime.
-they can only use it at work, and no where else (i set up their lastpass acct on individual workstation and save the login to the lastpass on auto-login)
-I can change the password on my account and with a few clicks, update all the shared accounts with the new password (they're working on an auto sync feature which is due out in a few weeks)
-One time password feature ( in case if you are in a public place and want to use a 1 time login)
-Cross browser support (my employees have their own browser preference and Lasspass supports it all)

These are just some of the features that I know of that some password managers do not have. If your purpose of having a password manager is only to securely store passwords for 1 person there are so many out there that do this well. IF you have a need to share password with others like many small businesses out there, then you need to take a serious look at lastpass.

Brainstormer

by Terarus on 30. January 2010 - 23:39  (42443)

Lastpass now provides multi-factor authentication protection for free users (was a premium service). It is a double layered protection in case your password gets stolen as it requires you to enter a PIN from a specific grid after entering your master password.

by Anupam on 13. December 2009 - 9:10  (38514)

I had the LastPass setup in a folder. Whenever I used to go to that folder, the folder stopped responding for sometime, just sort of hanged... and after sometime things would be normal. I deleted LastPass... folder behaves normally.

Anyone else experienced that? What can be the cause for this?

by Anonymous on 6. December 2009 - 13:06  (37952)

I wanted to like LastPass. I wanted to live my life on the web. I tried it for a week. In my opinion, it's not quite as good as RoboForm - although maybe I'm too used to the latter's quirks. LastPass worked with over 99% of my sites, but did struggle with a couple (yes, posted to the LastPass forum). RoboForm worked with all of them - and seemed less intrusive. Free is nice, of course (unless that's your income), but RoboForm is hardly expensive. I'm glad I tried it. I may try it again in the future.

by Anonymous on 9. August 2009 - 12:31  (26691)

what a shopping center for hackers...

by Anonymous on 22. February 2010 - 10:34  (44170)

if all the hacker will find is garbled/hashed/encrypted information, then it makes it a very undesirable target for hackers.

by Super2cool on 10. August 2009 - 3:05  (26720)
by Anonymous on 20. August 2009 - 16:45  (31237)

That's developers marketing, why should I trust it? A lot more convincing is the following page...

by Anonymous on 3. July 2009 - 21:22  (24616)

Another Great Online Password Manager: http://mitto.com

Free and easy to use.

-Lisa B.

by Anonymous on 3. July 2009 - 7:02  (24588)

Here's another one that's just as good: Billeo http://www.billeo.com/page/homepage.jsp?sitename=Billeo It keeps all your information safe as it is VeriSign secured and TRUSTe certified. Other than managing passwords it also sends reminders when bills are due, auto fills forms and saves receipts. It is a free browser plug-in, now available for Firefox 3.5 as well. Very handy!

by Anonymous on 20. May 2009 - 1:24  (21913)

I totally would not use a password manager based in part or in whole online, encryption or not. If you have cyberstalkers, as I do, they can just see the site where you store your passwords, contact the site covertly (warrant or not!) and convince them to hand over your information. This is reality, people today have the mentality of a police state, and they collaborate with self-appointed police very happily outside the law. I'd do nothing that's connected to the internet with all my passwords.

by brotola (not verified) on 22. December 2010 - 16:24  (63085)

none of this string makes any sense re: security except what you have said. Bravo! Any on line password site is compromisable.

by Anonymous on 4. August 2009 - 6:05  (26234)

If your data is encrypted, all the owners of the site would be able to turn over is a bunch of gibberish, which is useless without your own password to the service.

Offline is somewhat more secure, but not as convenient - what if you want to access a service of yours while visiting someone else? It's something I do a lot. And with some online services, like mitto (what I use), you have to also confirm with a text message, so if the other computer has a keylogger, you're still safe.

What's right for you really depends on what you're doing and how you approach computing.

by Anonymous on 25. July 2009 - 8:37  (25733)

I agree.
One would have to be a raving idiot, to store passwords online
No offence

by Anonymous on 18. May 2009 - 21:36  (21811)

I guess I'm just not puter literate enough to appreciate lastpass, but I found it just too complicated. Problem is that now lastpass has all my pass words on there servers..was able to locate some in firefox browser password manager..but all were removed from secure login...so, I will have to start over again I guess. Am using firefox v 3.0.10,v 3.5 beta 4,and minefield, as well as k-meleon, and opera..ie is permanently in my cyber doghouse. So, not exactly a newby,but apparently not sophisticated enough to want to use keypass. Too bad, I did want to use it,especially after all the glowing feed back here.

by Anonymous on 14. March 2009 - 7:40  (17809)

You've converted me from KeyPass Gizmo! just took some getting used to...

techSupportalert fan :)

by Anonymous on 2. March 2009 - 22:16  (17066)

I'm also trying to switch over from RoboForm to LastPass, because I'm not paranoid enough to NOT trust the encryption! And I want to use the web-centric cloud goodness to not have to even log into a usb based portable browser... though that is not too bad, not really a hassle. My biggest issue: I too am dependent on IE Tab to render my work email (OWA) which needs multiple views daily. Since RoboForm DID IN FACT work with IE Tab, I am hopeful that LastPass can also eventually work with it... It was as easy as clicking the RoboForm taskbar icon, choosing my web mail, and a new IE tab automatically opened, autofilled, and auto-submitted - sweet!
JoeSiegrist says the IE Tab developers need to make it compatible, but this thread says the IE Tab lead developer has quit the project http://forums.mozillazine.org/viewtopic.php?f=48&t=505032&st=0&sk=t&sd=a...
Anybody know anything more? Any developments on the LastPass side of things?

by Anonymous on 16. March 2009 - 20:17  (17985)

In addition to all versions of Internet Explorer, RoboForm is fully compatible and supports the latest version of FireFox. Please visit this link for the most current version:
http://www.roboform.com/download.html

RoboForm users can choose one of five algorithms for encryption-AES,BlowFish,DES,3DES,and RC6. We have a desktop version that stores all files locally in addition to our USB version.

by Bill Hart (not verified) on 27. April 2011 - 22:48  (71026)

I had the last roboform pro 6.xx version on 4 computers. When I installed Mozilla firefox ver 4.x I found that roboform did not work. I went to their site and got an "update" ver 7.x that I installed on all 4 computers. On one of the computers I received a message that I needed to "activate" roboform.When I went to the roboform site it requested a sales number. Then I got an email that said I should reinstall ver 6.x which I did. On 2 of the computers I got the message that this 6.x version needed activation. Now I am stuck with 2 "free" versions that are crippled and 2 other "pro" versions. None of the versions work with firefox ver 4.x.
So go ahead and buy roboform and wait awhile and they will scr3w you.

by Anonymous on 30. December 2009 - 1:39  (39772)

You forgot to mention that Roboform only works with Firefox on Windows and the desktop version is Windows only. Been using Roboform for years and love it except for the lack of cross-platform support. It keeps me constantly looking for another alternative. And don't suggest Roboform online. I have no desire to store any of my data on your servers. Give me a way to use my server instead of yours and Linux Firefox and I'll quit looking at other solutions.

by Anonymous on 22. February 2009 - 0:52  (16529)

This is the worst let-down of a software that I have had the misfortune of trying. The software is full of bugs and lacks even basic functionality. Let me give you an example. Suppose you store your password for your outlook login in lastpass. You can't log in directly from a browser, so you have to open the passcard and copy the password and paste it into the outlook login window. But the problem is you have to show the password in plain text for the copy and paste to work. I kid you not. If the password is hidden, it copies over as a bunch of binary characters that outlook will not accept. I don't know how so many people tolerate such a bad implementation of a good concept. There are better online password managers like passpack and clipperz out there if you are interested in the concept. Don't waste your time with lastpass.

by Rizar on 22. February 2009 - 18:06  (16589)

I think you overgeneralize a little. LastPass has the features you want from its add-on, which is for Firefox and IE. It automatically goes to sites, autofills, auto logs-in, etc. It's a one-click solution.

If you don't have the add-on, just go to the website, click on "Bookmarklet" and drag and drop the bookmarklet for the session. It will autofill or autologin whatever current page is open. Then you can just copy and paste the URL instead of the passwords and simply hit the bookmarklet. You can also grab bookmarklets to autofill & auto login for IE and Firefox and other browsers too.

Hope this helps,
Rizar

by Anonymous on 23. February 2009 - 15:53  (16666)

Care to explain how either the add-on or a bookmarklet would allow me to log into outlook 2003 without revealing my password for the whole world to see? It is a fundamental flaw in the software that all the flashiness in the world can not solve. ClipperZ and PassPack have the exact same functionality as lastpass (bookmarklet, auto-login, etc.) for web logins, and they also allow you to copy passwords to stand-alone non-browser windows without revealing it in plain text. Overall, I find the latter two much better thought-out implementations of the concept than lastpass ever will be.

by Rizar on 23. February 2009 - 19:46  (16683)

From the forum:
"You can add sites without URLs for local applications, and use Pocket to help you copy and paste into them (though we're developing something more advanced solution for local applications soon)."

From the help menu:
"One final exporting option is to a 'LastPass Encrypted File'. You can then import this data into LastPass Pocket to view your data. This file can be saved locally or saved on a USB Drive with the Pocket executable."

LastPass Pocket: https://lastpass.com/download.php (681.2 KB)

by Anonymous on 24. February 2009 - 4:59  (16704)

That is precisely what PasswordSafe and KeePass already allow me to do, thank you very much. And they are opensource, so at least I know I can trust their encryption and other security details. I just don't see why people should tolerate an obviously badly-designed product when there are better products out there whichever way you slice it and dice it. Both clipperz and passpack also provide a portable version of their program that you can use with a flash drive.

by Anonymous on 26. December 2009 - 4:28  (39483)

I would really like to know why you think opensource is trust worthy? How do you know that some greasy, pizza eating, coke slurping nerd, sitting in his mother's basement isn't coding secret backdoors into the program?
Unless you can read and fully comprehend data encryption code, and then compile the programs yourself, you really have no more security than getting the software from a big box company. And if you can do the aforementioned code analysis, then you would simply write the code yourself.

by Anonymous on 30. December 2009 - 1:50  (39773)

"As a cryptography and computer security expert, I have never understood the current fuss about the open source software movement. In the cryptography world, we consider open source necessary for good security; we have for decades. Public security is always more secure than proprietary security. It's true for cryptographic algorithms, security protocols, and security source code. For us, open source isn't just a business model; it's smart engineering practice."

Bruce Schneier, Well known security expert

Popular open source gets looked at by a lot of people, some of which are security experts who will examine the code. Flaws will be exposed and fixed. Closed source doesn't have that advantage.

"Instead of using public algorithms, the U.S. digital cellular companies decided to create their own proprietary cryptography. Over the past few years, different algorithms have been made public. (No, the cell phone industry didn't want them made public. What generally happens is that a cryptographer receives a confidential specification in a plain brown wrapper.) And once they have been made public, they have been broken. Now the U.S. cellular industry is considering public algorithms to replace their broken proprietary ones.

On the other hand, the popular e-mail encryption program PGP has always used public algorithms. And none of those algorithms has ever been broken. The same is true for the various Internet cryptographic protocols: SSL, S/MIME, IPSec, SSH, and so on."

Bruce Schneier, Well known security expert

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