How To Uninstall The Ask Toolbar

The Ask Toolbar and other applications are increasingly being bundled with programs; most notably freeware. It's usually installed during the installation of a program, and it's easy to miss the step where you can uncheck the Ask Toolbar option.

Ghacks has an article on how to uninstall the Ask Toolbar manually or with the Ask Toolbar Remover and includes a section on troubleshooting.
If you find yourself with an unasked install for this particular toolbar here's how to get rid of it.
 

Ask Toolbar Removal, How To Uninstall

Off for now,
Rhiannon

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Comments

by dadslawyer on 3. June 2013 - 1:14  (108230)

My wife unintentionally installed the Ask toolbar on a Windows 7 PC along with a Java update.

The Ask toolbar remover from AutoClean, recommended by the Ghacks article, removed the Ask toolbar easily.

It's a free download, ASKRemover.zip, from:

http://autoclean.computersitter.com/downloads

Just click on it and it unzips and then runs a script.

There's also a free Multi-ToolbarRemover.zip download from AutoClean, along with two other freeware programs that look interesting. (I haven't tried any of these three myself.)

Kudos to AutoClean for sharing freeware!

Best practice is to do your best to get the users you support to scroll down through those long end user licensing agreements and uncheck any boxes (checked by default) which authorize the installation of unwanted software like the Ask toolbar.

Thanks, MC, for the tip re: using Bill Pytlovany's invaluable WinPatrol to block Ask toolbar installations!

.

by rhiannon on 3. June 2013 - 20:17  (108249)

The Multi-Toolbar remover looks interesting, I'll have a look at it.
MC is right, WinPatrol rocks. :)

I totally agree with thoroughly checking EULA's and the small print that often include toolbars.

EULA's are usually yawn producing but worth the read.

by Joe A.TT on 4. June 2013 - 1:51  (108252)

I like your description "yawn producing" :-). I think it's intentional that EULAs are mostly so long and you can only read them in those tiny boxes with no way to expand them. Maybe developers hope most people will just click "agree" and be done with it, but that's exactly how you could fall prey.

I agree too that the site has some quite useful information. Even though I don't foresee myself ever using their program, it's good to know what files to look for where.

As ever, thanks for all your good work rhiannon!

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