How to Create Strong Passwords that You Can Remember the Quick and Easy Way

How to create strong passwords that are hard to crack but still possible to remember is the subject of much discussion (for example, here). Long, random combinations of various types of characters provide resistance to hacking but are cumbersome to use. So various schemes for constructing strong passwords that are more easily remembered abound. In this tip, I point out a website that will make it easier for you.

The site is called Password Savvy. It is free and requires no registration. It is an online page where you can generate useful but hard-to-hack passwords. A partial view of the page is shown in the figure below. It’s simple to use. Enter two unrelated words or phrases, click a button to add some capitals and other kinds of symbols, and you have a password. Click another button and it is pasted to the clipboard. 

Password Savvy

And there you have it – a way to generate useful passwords that is about as easy as you can get.

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This tips section is maintained by Vic Laurie. Vic runs several websites with Windows how-to's, guides, and tutorials, including a site for learning about Windows and the Internet and another with Windows 7 tips.

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Comments

by olamoree on 19. February 2013 - 20:57  (105555)

I agree. A combination of words from your mother tongue language combined with words from one of your known foreign languages can produce a LONG and more secure password that you may easily remember... something like: My_mother_is_Sra._Gomez_44_but_my_uncle_is_Sayyid_Badr_52_and_I_am_Obo'te_24. So you have combined four languages and some numbers... as spaces are usually not allowed, you can use the UnderScore instead.

by Geert on 19. February 2013 - 12:13  (105546)

Replacing an A by 4 and an i by 1 is so outdated. Every password cracking tool knows those substitutions and uses them.
Is "foretolD.H4lo" a stronger password than "foretold halo"? I don't think so.

Length is more important than complexity when it comes to secure passwords. (cf. http://www.infoworld.com/d/security-central/password-size-does-matter-531 and http://technicallyeasy.net/2010/03/size-does-matter-at-least-for-passwords/)

My advice: go for LONG passwords (or sentences - if spaces are allowed)
- that don't include existing dictionary words ONLY
- that mix words of different languages (you know)

Such passwords should be easy to remember and secure.

by v.laurie on 19. February 2013 - 23:58  (105561)

"Replacing an A by 4 and an i by 1 is so outdated. Every password cracking tool knows those substitutions and uses them.
Is "foretolD.H4lo" a stronger password than "foretold halo"? I don't think so."

It is pointless to criticize a specific example that the site posted for illustrative purposes. Try a few examples and if they have flaws, let us know.

by Geert on 20. February 2013 - 8:09  (105563)

>> It is pointless to criticize a specific example that the site posted for illustrative purposes.
Not if that's just how the site works.
And not if my comment makes people think about better password(strategie)s.

by v.laurie on 20. February 2013 - 14:12  (105586)

I appreciate your comments, Geert.

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